Metal Roof and Wall Panels Provide Industrial Aesthetic to Texas Ranch

Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof.

Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof.

As many architects can attest, designing a residence for oneself can present challenges. But architect Jack Carson rose to the occasion by creating a striking design for his new home, located on a ranch in the beautiful Texas Hill Country. Design for the 7,000-square-foot residence follows LEED principles and blends a unique palette of “industrial” materials with ultra-modern aesthetics.

“The house is truly on a ranch. We have cattle on the property,” says Carson, president of Carson Design Associates in Austin, Texas. “We wanted to keep the design somewhat in the ranch vernacular but with a contemporary look. The reliance on metal for the roof and cladding and an exposed structure helped create a ranch building feel. We like to think of it as an ‘industrial ranch’ aesthetic.”

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed.

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed.

Several of Petersen Aluminum’s PAC-CLAD profiles contributed to Carson’s success in delivering the desired look. Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof. The 16-inch roof panels were rollformed onsite because of extremely tight site conditions and because the only access to the site was via a dirt road that wasn’t wide enough to allow large trucks to deliver factory-formed panels. An additional 3,000 square feet of Snap-Clad panels also was installed vertically as siding around two garages and at specific locations on the house as accent panels.

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed. All wall panels were manufactured at Petersen’s Tyler, Texas, plant.

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.”

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.”

The onsite fabrication of the roof panels and the installation of all roof and wall panels was performed by Dean Contracting Co., Kyle, Texas. “The greatest challenge was executing the architects dream for his home,” recalls Jesse Brown, vice president of Dean Contracting. “The design included a myriad of varying geometric shapes on many different planes and a blend of materials that required complex detailing. It was probably one of the top-five most challenging jobs that we have ever done.”

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass. “We have great views into the valley with no neighbors,” Carson adds. “A large overhanging soffit covers a large portion of the deck and shades all of the glass.”

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.” Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit. Petersen functioned as distributor of the Reynobond ACM.

Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit.

Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit.

The decision to use Petersen for the roof and siding was arrived at rather easily. Carson notes: “I was familiar with PAC-CLAD and wanted to use it but also wanted to rely on the builder’s recommendations regarding materials and subcontractors. In our very first meeting with the roofer, Dean Contracting, they brought in samples of PAC-CLAD and recommended using it. That made the decision pretty easy.”

Carson is a big believer in metal as a roofing and cladding material. “We wanted to be as maintenance-free as possible. And sustainability was an important component as well,” Carson says. “We used LEED principles in our design. Metal is far greener than asphalt shingles and other alternatives. It’s just a great option for residential construction.”

The installation went smoothly, Carson adds, primarily because he relied on the expertise of Dean Contracting. “My approach is to listen to the experts. Jesse Brown and his crew worked out the complex detailing. They use metal all the time and are extremely capable. We collaborated as necessary but I basically left it in their hands.”

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass.

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass.

Brown was quick to give full credit to the crew that was led by Juan Rojas, sheet-metal superintendent. Rojas is a 24-year employee of Dean Contracting and Brown cites Rojas’ attention to function and precise detailing as a main reason why the job turned out so well.

The house—in spite of its size and location in the hot Texas climate and the large amount of glass—is energy efficient. Two inches of rigid insulation was installed under the metal roof and an additional 4 inches of sprayed insulation went under the roof deck. “The heavy insulation and the shade provided by the overhang makes it very energy efficient. The house stays a very constant temperature,” Carson says.

The entire property captures rainwater in 18,000-gallon collection tanks, which is yet another reason for using metal, Carson points out.

When asked about the challenge of designing for yourself, Carson thought it was easier than designing for a traditional client. “I was probably more demanding in ‘getting it right’, but once I knew I had the right design and materials, I didn’t have to convince myself that it was the best direction. There was no negotiation or comprising the design in any way,” Carson says. “The biggest problem any architect has in designing for themselves is in ‘editing out.’ We know all of the possibilities, and being able to prioritize and filter out the unnecessary options is often the hardest challenge.”

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

An Oceanfront Elementary School Poses Tough Problems, but a Coated Aluminum Standing-seam Roof Passes the Test

Elementary school students sometimes find themselves staring out the window, but few have a view to rival that of the students at Sullivan’s Island Elementary School in Sullivan’s Island, S.C. The school is located on oceanfront property, and when it was time for the original building to be rebuilt, the site posed numerous challenges.

The standing-seam roof is made up of 0.040-inch coated aluminum panels that are 18-inches wide.

The standing-seam roof is made up of 0.040-inch coated aluminum panels that are 18-inches wide.

The original school had been built in the 1950s. It had been designed for 350 students and built on grade. The new school would have to be elevated to conform to modern building codes and service 500 students. The structure would not only have to withstand high winds, severe weather and a salt-air environment, but it also would have to fit into its surroundings. Many residents feared the larger building would look out of place in the cozy beach community. It was architect Jerry English’s job to figure out a way to make it work.

English is a principal at Cummings & McCrady Architects, Charleston, S.C., the architect of record on the project. He worked with a talented team of construction professionals, including Ricky Simmons, general manager of Keating Roofing & Sheet Metal Co. Inc. in Charleston, to refine his vision and bring it to life. English and Simmons shared their insight on the project, and they both point to the building’s metal roof as a key element in the project’s success.

CHALLENGING DESIGN

Cummings & McCrady Architects handles a broad range of commercial, institutional, religious and historic work—new construction and renovation. The firm had done a lot of work with the Charleston County School District over the years, including a small library addition for the original Sullivan’s Island Elementary School after Hurricane Hugo passed through in 1989, and it was awarded the new construction project.

The building’s foundation system had to meet strict regulations regarding resistance to storm surge. The building is elevated on concrete piers, which were topped with a 6-inch reinforced concrete slab. Metal framing was constructed above the slab. “With our building, we had to raise the underside of the structure almost 7 feet above the grade,” English recalls. “What we did is we built it a little bit higher than that so the underside could be left open and used for playground.”

For English, coming up with a design that would reflect the character of the local community was the biggest challenge. To achieve that goal, he broke up the building into four sections and spread them across the site with the tallest sections in the center. “We have four linked segments that transition down on each end to the height of the adjacent residences,” he says.

The roof was also designed to blend in with the neighboring homes, many of which feature metal roofs. “The idea of pitched roofs with overhangs became a strong unifying element,” English explains.

English checked with several major metal roofing manufacturers to determine which products could withstand the harsh oceanfront environment and wind-uplift requirements. “Virtually every one of them would only warranty aluminum roofing,” he says. “The wind requirement and the resistance to the salt air were what drove us to a coated aluminum roof.”

The majority of the panels were factory-made, but the manufacturer supplied the rollforming machine and the operator to handle the onsite rollforming of the largest panels.

The majority of the panels were factory-made, but Petersen Aluminum supplied the rollforming machine and the operator to handle the onsite rollforming of the largest panels.

The standing-seam roof is made up of 0.040-inch coated aluminum panels that are 18-inches wide. Metal trusses give the roof system its shape. English tapped the resources of roof consultant ADC in Charleston and the metal roofing manufacturer to iron out all the details. English wanted to avoid any cross seams in the metal roofing, so he worked with Dave Landis, the manufacturer’s architectural/technical sales manager, to arrange for the longest panels to be formed onsite.

The roof also includes two decks that serve as outdoor teaching areas. These sections were covered with a two-ply modified bitumen roof system and protected with a multi-colored elevated concrete paver system.

Another standout feature is the school’s entry tower, which is topped by a freestanding hip roof featuring curved panels. This roof was constructed with panels that were 12-inches wide. “We found other examples on the island where the base of the roof flares a little bit as a traditional element, and with the closer seamed panels they were able to get those curves,” English says. “It’s a refinement that’s a little different than the rest of the roof, but it’s the proper scale and the fine detailing pulls it together and sets if off from the main roof forms that are behind it.”

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

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A Watertight Warranty Convinces HOA to Select Standing-seam Metal Roofing

When you know you can do a good job and you know you’re working with good products, you don’t mind being held accountable. On Top Roofing of Park City, Utah, recently completed a demanding roofing project and supplied the homeowners association with a watertight warranty.

With a strict spec from the consultant and a watertight warranty to back up the work, a standing-seam metal roofing system installed by On Top Roofing was selected for Cache Condos

With a strict spec from the consultant and a watertight warranty to back up the work, a standing-seam metal roofing system installed by On Top Roofing was selected for Cache Condos.

Homeowners associations, or HOAs, have been known to provide challenges to roofers, especially metal roofing installers. The only thing more daunting than an uneducated HOA board is an HOA board that was forced to learn about roofing. The HOA board at the Cache Condos in Park City knows roofing.

The original roof on the condos was a cedar shake that lasted more than 20 years, but a little more than five years ago, it was starting to fail. The board elected to go with a corrugated metal roof with a rusty look.

“In the five years they had that corrugated roof, they had more trouble with leaks than they did in 20 years with the shake roof,” says Jeremy Russell of On Top Roofing. “It was a bad install by a company no longer in business. So they hired a consultant—a consultant who insisted that all details be installed to specification. That’s what we do.”

First, the consultant and the board had to be re-sold on metal roofing for the Cache Condos. The rusty 7/8-inch corrugated metal roof installed just five years ago was installed with exposed fasteners, was rusting in flashing areas and leaking in the laps when snow built up on the roof. With a strict spec from the consultant and a watertight warranty from Drexel Metals to back up the work, a standing-seam metal roofing system installed by On Top Roofing was selected.

“One of the requirements was we had to inject the seams with butyl,” Russell says. “So we purchased a Hot Melt [Technologies] system. It was a huge investment, but we were happy to do it. It was something we’ve wanted to do and this project got us to take that step.

“We received plenty of support from Drexel, putting everything together to meet the requirements of the consultant,” he adds. “We worked out all the details to spec and added some of our own that were above spec.”

One requirement was to use no exposed fasteners. That meant employing stainless-steel material in many of the details: skylights, chimneys, roof to wall flashings. “We etched it, primed it and painted it with automotive paint to match,” Russell notes. “It took more time, but it will not leak.”

One requirement was to avoid exposed fasteners, which meant employing stainless-steel material in many of the details: skylights, chimneys, roof to wall flashings.

One requirement was to avoid exposed fasteners, which meant employing stainless-steel material in many of the details: skylights, chimneys, roof to wall flashings.

More than 33,500 square feet of 22-gauge Galvalume 1 3/4-inch snap-lock standing-seam panels—all formed onsite—were installed by Russell’s crew. The roofing panels, rollformed on one of On Top Roofing’s two New Tech Machinery rollformers, were PVDF-painted in Medium Bronze. The project took about eight months to complete and On Top Roofing wrapped up in November 2014.

“We issued the warranty in December 2014,” says Frank Oswald, warranty inspector for Drexel Metals. “I’d say Jeremy went above and beyond what a typical installer would have done on this project. I was at this site on three different occasions because this project was really under a microscope. Ultimately, we’re quite satisfied with the work and the install.”

Snow-retention System Is Aesthetically Pleasing

Sno Gem Inc. has introduced Sno Blockade, a permanent snow-retention system that is aesthetically pleasing on standing-seam metal roofs.

Sno Gem Inc. has introduced Sno Blockade, a permanent snow-retention system that is aesthetically pleasing on standing-seam metal roofs.

Sno Gem Inc. has introduced Sno Blockade, a permanent snow-retention system that is aesthetically pleasing on standing-seam metal roofs. Choose between a 1- or 2-inch bar, available in standard mill finish aluminum or painted in a powder coating or Kynar finish. Sno Blockade fastens to almost any standing-seam metal roof system, employing the company’s WaveLock technology with three points of attachment without penetration, in conjunction with the Sno Blockade clamp. To reduce melting snow and ice from sliding underneath the bar, the company offers the Blockade Plate, which is installed on the upslope side of the bar. The standard Blockade Plate width is 3 inches but custom sizes are available.

High-power Density Flexible PV for Standing-seam Metal Roof Systems

Miasole has released its new FLEX 01-N PV module for architectural standing seam metal roof systems.

Miasole has released its new FLEX 01-N PV module for architectural standing seam metal roof systems.

Miasole, a company of Hanergy, has released its new FLEX 01-N PV module for architectural standing seam metal roof systems. The Miasole FLEX N series PV module is the roofing industry’s first high power density flexible PV module with a power efficiency of 15.5 percent. The FLEX module’s high performance self-adhesive provides a simple peel-n-stick installation method with the industry’s first 25-year adhesion guarantee.

The Miasole FLEX module fully adhered to the metal roof systems eliminates the need for racking and mechanical attachment or penetrations. The FLEX PV module low profile has the same wind uplift rating of the roof system design, making FLEX the best solar choice for high wind zones. Weighing less than 0.7 lb/sq ft, FLEX is idea for roofs with low load capacity and buildings in high seismic areas.

The Miasole FLEX N Series module can be purchased from leading metal roof manufacturers already factory laminated to their metal panel for immediate roof top installation using standard construction practices. FLEX modules can be installed in the field by the contractor. FLEX modules simplify project logistics, reduce labor costs, and installation time.

Attach Solar to Standing Seam without Compromising Warranties

Sno Gem Inc.'s PV Cube standing-seam attachment system

Sno Gem Inc.’s PV Cube standing-seam attachment system

Sno Gem Inc. has introduced the PV Cube standing-seam attachment system, a clamp-to-seam solar-panel racking and mounting system that provides strength through patent-pending WaveLock technology with three points of attachment. Four PV Cube profiles—PV Cube, PV Cube Wide, PV Cube Mini and PV Cube Zip—accommodate virtually any standing-seam metal roof. Silver Bullet set screws include a rounded bullet tip to maximize strength, but do not damage the paint finish or pierce the seam, meaning they won’t void warranties. All are constructed of aircraft-grade aluminum extrusion.

From Screw-down to Standing-seam Metal Roofing

Time to reroof an old screw-down metal roof? Are you thinking about upgrading to a new standing-seam roof? Great idea! Today’s new standing-seam roofs are truly state-of-the-art; available in many profiles and finishes; and, more importantly, address many of the issues encountered in older generation screw-down metal roofs.

Caulk, roof coating and tar patches were used to cover leaking fasteners and panel end laps.

Caulk, roof coating and tar patches were used to cover leaking fasteners and panel end laps.

The screw-down metal roof and wall panel has been the backbone of the metal building industry since its inception and still represents a significant part of the total market. Screw-down panels are lightweight, durable, inexpensive and strong enough to span up to 5 feet between structural supports. Screw-down roofs and walls also have a wonderful physical property: The panels can and frequently are used as “diaphragm bracing,” securely holding the building’s roof purlins and wall girts in position, adding rigidity to the structure in much the same way drywall strengthens stud walls. This is a huge material—and labor—cost saver!

The early systems were not without problems, however; much of the technology we take for granted today did not exist in the early years of pre-engineered buildings. Many roofs during the late ’60s thru early ’80s were installed using 10-year life fasteners to secure a 30-plus-year life roof.

The fastener issue seems crazy today given the numerous inexpensive, long-life, weathertight, self-drilling screws available. Back when I started in the metal building industry, you could have the newly developed “self-drilling” cadmium fasteners or “self-tapping” stainless. Self-tapping meant you had to pre-drill a hole in the panel and purlin to install it—a much slower and more expensive process. Most of us used the less expensive but (unknown to us at the time) fairly short-life cadmium-coated fasteners and often never provided the option of a stainless upgrade to our customers.

Another shortcoming with screw-down roof panels is that, generally speaking, screw-down panels on metal buildings should be a maximum length of about 80 feet. Longer roof-panel runs frequently suffered rips or slots in the metal caused by expansion and contraction. Metal panels expand and contract at a rate of about 1 inch per 100 feet of panel run. This is normally absorbed by the back and forth rolling of the roof purlin and some panel bowing, but after 80 feet or so they can no longer absorb the movement resulting in trauma to the panels and trim. I have frequently seen this 80-foot limit exceeded.

a rusted fastener has caused the surrounding metal to corrode and fail.

A rusted fastener has caused the surrounding
metal to corrode and fail.

Standing-seam panels eliminate both of these shortcomings. The panels are attached to “sliding clips”. These clips are screwed to the purlins and seamed into the side laps of the panels securing them and thus the panels have very few, if any, exposed fasteners. The clips maintain a solid connection with the structure of the building while still allowing the panels, which can be 150 feet or longer, to move with expansion and contraction forces without damage.

This is great news for the building owner: You’re providing a more watertight roof, few if any penetrations, and expansion and contraction ability. It does come with a catch, however; standing-seam panels, because they move, do not provide diaphragm strength. The building’s roof purlins must have significantly more bridging and bracing to keep them in their correct and upright position. This is automatically taken care of in new building design but when it comes time to reroof an older building, removing the existing screw-down roof could remove the diaphragm bracing it once provided and make the building structurally unsound. Yes, that’s bad!

PHOTOS: ROOF HUGGER INC.

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Combine Advantages of Single Ply with Aesthetics of Standing-seam Metal

Carlisle SynTec Systems' Sure-Flex PVC Contour Rib Profile

Carlisle SynTec Systems’ Sure-Flex PVC Contour Rib Profile

Carlisle SynTec Systems is pleased to introduce its new Sure-Flex PVC Contour Rib Profile. This innovative product combines the advantages of a single-ply system with the aesthetic appeal of a standing seam metal roof. To achieve this look, Carlisle’s PVC Contour Rib Profile is hot-air welded in a parallel pattern to the exposed surface of FleeceBACK KEE HP FRS or FleeceBACK PVC membrane.

Designed to cast a distinctive shadow that can be seen from the ground or surrounding areas, Carlisle’s PVC Contour Rib Profile provides enhanced aesthetics when compared to other PVC rib profiles. This product is extruded from the same weather-resistant PVC compound as Carlisle’s Sure-Flex PVC roofing membrane, ensuring comparable weathering characteristics and an excellent color match. Carlisle’s durable PVC Contour Rib Profile is dimensionally stabilized and strengthened by a 1/8-inch fiberglass reinforcing cord that runs the length of each section. During installation, the 10’ PVC Contour Rib Profile sections are joined together by a non-corroding, fiberglass pin, ensuring compatibility and continuity throughout the application.

Carlisle’s PVC Contour Rib Profile is available in white, gray, and tan colors and measures 10-feet long, 1¼-inch tall, and 2 1/8-inch wide (including the welding flanges). The vertical profile is a substantial 3/8-inch thick, and each section of PVC Contour Rib Profile has a 1/8-inch alignment hole. This product is packaged 20 pieces per carton, and each carton includes 25 connecting pins.

AceClamp/PMC Industries Can Apply the UL Mark to Roof Fasteners and Solar Kits

AceClamp/PMC Industries has received authorization to apply the UL Mark to its AceClamp non-penetrating, standing-seam metal roof fasteners and solar kits. This stamp of approval indicates a product has passed stringent testing for code requirements and performance.

The AceClamp A2 and Solar Kit and AceCamp ML and Solar Kit were tested for Mechanical Loading and Bonding Evaluation in accordance with UL 2703. The AceClamp A2 and Solar Kit was also evaluated to UL 467 for its integral ground-lug function.

UL 2703 covers rack mounting systems, mounting grounding/bonding components, and clamping/retention devices for specific flat-plate photovoltaic modules and panels. UL 467 applies to grounding and bonding equipment in accordance with national electrical codes.

To meet UL 2703 requirements, mounting and clamping devices are submitted to rigorous testing methods to confirm the products will withstand most any environment and maintain electrical conductivity.

Bryer Co. Now Offers X-Gard Snow Retention

The Bryer Co., a supplier of metal construction fasteners and accessories, launches its sales of the new S-5! X-Gard pipe snow retention system for standing seam metal roofs. As one of the only full-line S-5! distributors to offer online purchasing through an e-commerce store, and because there is an increasing market demand for stronger snow retention solutions, The Bryer Company expects X-Gard to become a top seller.

X-Gard is a non-penetrating snow retention system designed to preserve roof manufacturers’ warranties. Its innovative double-clamp design allows X-Gard to provide unprecedented holding strength when attached with S-5!’s standard or even mini-sized clamps; no other pipe snow retention system on the market has proven stronger. A one- or two-pipe system spanning up to 48 inches, X-Gard provides a reliable snow retention solution in a wide variety of situations.

For almost 30 years, The Bryer Company has been the premier manufacturer of architectural and commercial metal roof, wall, and soffit systems in the Northwest. The Bryer Company is also a long-time strategic national distributor for S-5!, carrying a full line of accessory mounting solutions, including the industry-leading ColorGard bar-type snow retention system. According to Peter Tuininga, VP at The Bryer Company, “Partnering with S-5! has been a jointly-profitable business venture. We’ve been able to provide our customers with truly innovative solutions by S-5!, the newest of which is the exceptional X-Gard.”

S-5! is the well-respected international authority on ancillary attachment technology for the metal roofing industry with products installed on over 1.4 million metal roofs worldwide. Providing strength and longevity never before seen, S-5! is trusted by engineers for critical holding strength, by architects for sleek design aesthetics, by roofers for zero-penetration technology, and by contractors for easy installation.

Rob Haddock, CEO at S-5!, feels confident that The Bryer Company will see high interest in the X-Gard, stating, “At S-5! we’ve always take innovation, engineering, development, thorough testing, and proper market introduction very seriously. Bryer trusts us to provide them with top-of-the-line products like X-Gard, and we have seen that Bryer, in turn, provides unbeatable customer service, including their popular e-commerce option.”