Roof and Cladding Panels Look Like Rusted Metal

Cor-Ten AZP Raw offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

Cor-Ten AZP Raw offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

McElroy Metal has made available Cor-Ten AZP Raw, which offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding. Cor-Ten AZP Raw is a fluoropolymer coating system that uses cool pigment technology McElroy Metal applies over Galvalume-coated steel sheet. It’s available in a variety of McElroy Metal standing-seam and through-fastened panel profiles.

Translucent Roofing Material Mechanically Locks Together

Topgal panels are linked together with easy-to-fit connectors that create a mechanical lock between the sheets, ensuring strength and water resistance. PHOTO: Plazit Polygal

Topgal panels are linked together with easy-to-fit connectors that create a mechanical lock between the sheets, ensuring strength and water resistance. PHOTO: Plazit Polygal

Plazit Polygal, a producer of polycarbonate building materials, has launched Topgal, a modular range of translucent roofing material that is attractive, economic, flexible and easy to install.

Suitable for any building that requires natural light, the Topgal range can be used everywhere—from sports stadiums and commercial buildings to domestic structures, such as pool enclosures.

Produced in five different colors—bronze, blue, clear, ice and polyshade silver—delivering different levels of light transmission, the Topgal sheets come in a variety of sizes and thicknesses to meet the most demanding needs. Although the Topgal system is translucent, all damaging UV rays are filtered out while heat transference is limited.

Durable and weather-resistant, the system, which consists of the panels and a number of connectors, edge protectors and fasteners, can be installed with a screwdriver.

Topgal panels are linked together with easy-to-fit connectors that create a mechanical lock between the sheets, ensuring strength and water resistance. Fixture points are hidden and the sheets can be flexed to suit any type of structure. Because the panels are modular, units can be added as needed. The Topgal standing-seam panels and components integrate the unique properties of multi wall structure to deliver strength, rigidity and thermal insulation Topgal sheets are manufactured in 600- and 1,000-millimeter widths (center to center) and in thicknesses from 8 to 20 millimeters. In addition to the standard colors, Plazit Polygal can tailor special colors and solar-radiation levels.

Roof Is Standing-seam and Through-fastened

Lester Building Systems has launched its patented Eclipse Roof System.

Lester Building Systems has launched its patented Eclipse Roof System.

Lester Building Systems has launched its patented Eclipse Roof System that combines the structural integrity, efficiency and ease of installation of a through-fastened roof with the sleek appearance and leak-free performance of a standing-seam roof. The 36-inch-wide panels install quickly; one-third to one-half the number of panels and fewer screws are required than when using typical standing-seam roof panels. The 26-gauge Eclipse panel can be installed over open purlins; no roof deck is required.

Roof Hugger Celebrates 25th Anniversary

In 1991, two developer/contactors and longtime friends, Red McConnohie and Dale Nelson, began a part-time business to manufacture and distribute structurally sound sub-purlins for installing a new metal roof directly over an existing metal roof. The idea came about because McConnohie owned a lease building that needed its roof to be replaced. After a few design sketches using a factory-notch concept with some ingenuity, the original Hugger sub-purlin came alive. McConnohie got his building reroofed and proposed to Nelson that they start a business together selling this innovative new product. So, they set off on a journey, which has lasted 25 years, and now has covered more than 70 million square feet of existing roofs nationally and abroad. The company is the brand Roof Hugger Inc.

The trek was not always that easy because the product is designed to fit over and around the major ribs of the existing panels. Have you ever thought about how many different metal roof profiles are out there? Hundreds, if not thousands. You have ribbed panels in a multitude of spacing and heights from 6 to 13 inches, there are corrugated panels with corrugations spaced from 2.25 to 4 inches, and of course, there are standing seams. These also widely varied because of the vertical and trapezoidal seam configurations, rib-to-rib spacing and heights and with or without standoff clips. Today, Roof Hugger has built a library full of manufacturer literature, both from the old days and the more recent. They refer to this library countless times during a given year but even to this day, they are given a previously unknown panel from a contractor or building owner needing to reroof an existing metal building.

Not only do the profiles and variations of existing metal roofs make this niche roof replacement market challenging at times, but because of the new stringent code requirements, you have panel testing to contend with, as well. Every manufacturer today, producing metal roofing, has and will continue to have their systems tested for performance. The most utilized test standard is known in metal construction as the “Standard Test Method for Structural Performance of Sheet Metal Roof and Siding Systems by Uniform Static Air Pressure Difference” or ASTM E-1592. Without it, it is extremely difficult to engineer roofing products to meet specified building code requirements for given wind speeds. It is not widely understood but each metal roof’s testing can and does vary from its counterparts although they frequently can look almost identical. This is due to seam design, clip design, metal thickness, design specifications and manufacturing limitations. Because of this, Roof Hugger began testing in 1996 and now has numerous metal roofs that have been tested over their sub-purlin systems. They have an (FM) Factory Mutual approval, as well as several (FL#) Florida Product Approved assemblies.

As Roof Hugger celebrates its 25th year, the Hugger team located outside Tampa, Fla., is excited to carry the “Hugger” brands on into the future. McConnohie passed in 2013 at the age of 87, and Roof Hugger is a big part of Red’s legacy, but Dale and Jan Nelson, now owners of Roof Hugger, continue to work relentlessly to make the Hugger stable of products better than any other metal-over-metal retrofit roof system available. Jan Nelson recently commented that “they are so fortunate to have met and grown to know the fabulous people in the metal construction industry via trade shows and organizational meetings. She went on to say, “We have gained an extended family that is surely the best gift of this journey and it puts a smile on my face daily.” Dale Nelson said, “I can’t believe it’s been 25 years. It’s been one heck of an enjoyable ride.” Dale Nelson was recently elected chairman of the Metal Construction Association (MCA), which he is no stranger to this kind of work. He has committed much of his life to volunteer work in both his private life, as well as in business activities.

Roof Hugger now has four production locations in Florida, Indiana, Texas and Washington. Three of their sub-purlin profiles can ship within two to three days and others are made-to-order to ship within 10 to 15 days. Roof Hugger is specified by numerous levels of local, state and federal government agencies, especially the U.S. Military. A recent look at their shipments, found that more than 3 million square feet have been installed at more than 70 domestic military facilities. They provide quotes in hours and a live voice always answers the phone. Prior to Red’s passing, if you were lucky he would answer the phone with a loud “ROOF HUGGER – McCONNOHIE”, and when you call today you will still get an equally enthusiastic greeting from the Roof Hugger crew of Jan, Bill, DJ or Dale.

Englert and Swenson Shear Partner to Provide Panel Preparation Equipment

Englert Inc., the New Jersey-based supplier of painted metal coil and metal fabricating machinery for the roofing and gutter industry, and Swenson Shear of Ceres, Calif., manufacturer of innovative tools to speed the preparation and installation of metal panels, have announced a strategic alliance to provide the Metalman Snaptable HD and Metalman Snaptable Pro collection of panel preparation equipment.

With the partnership, Englert will offer its customers two all-in-one panel preparation machines with the ability to notch, slit and hem standing-seam profiles from 12 to 24 inches, along with 33- to 60-inch slitting and hemming capabilities, while saving an average of 35 percent in labor cost.

Tony Newman, director of sales at Englert notes, “We have long sought to align with an innovative equipment manufacturer in the U.S. and feel we have now connected with a company whose products are suitable to Englert’s level of quality.”

The alliance gives Englert proven metal preparation products it can confidently offer to customers. “The Metalman Snaptables are easy to use and are more effective than manual efforts to create perfect valleys, ridges and edges,” Newman remarked. “These products will enhance the roll forming product line we already offer, and we know that our customers will be particularly happy with the two-year manufacturers’ warranty.”

With a tradition of innovation and proud craftsmanship that stretches back to 1966, Englert serves commercial and residential roofing contractors throughout the U.S. with the highest quality painted metal coil, a wide variety of roofing accessories, including seamers and curvers, and numerous, in-stock roll-forming machines, including the Multi-Panel which can roll-form 10 different panel widths and styles.

Newman continues: “We are dedicated to developing relationships and creating programs that support the growth of our customers’ businesses. We listen to our customers and anticipate their changing needs. These co-branded Metalman Snaptables are just one more example of that guiding principle.”

Swenson Shear’s SnapTable PRO Is Equipped to Notch, Slit and Hem up to 60-inch Offsets for Hip-valley Roofing Cuts

The new SnapTable PRO from Swenson Shear, Ceres, Calif., adjusts to accommodate panels between 12 and 24 inches.

The new SnapTable PRO from Swenson Shear, Ceres, Calif., adjusts to accommodate panels between 12 and 24 inches.

The new SnapTable PRO from Swenson Shear, Ceres, Calif., adjusts to accommodate panels between 12 and 24 inches. It is equipped to notch, slit and hem up to 60-inch offsets for hip-valley roofing cuts. The SnapTable PRO is the newest addition to Swenson Shear’s collection and was added to increase the capability to slit and hem up to 60 inches for any commercial, industrial or residential job site.

The SnapTable PRO is an all-in-one panel preparation system for standing-seam metal roofing. It was designed and is manufactured in the U.S. The product saves an average of 35 percent in labor costs.

SnapTable PRO was designed for light to 20-gauge metal, including Corten 1 inch; 1 1/2-inch nail strip; 1-, 1 1/2-, 1 3/4-inch SnapLock; 1-, 1 1/2-, 2-inch mechanical seam; Zip-Rib; and many more options.

It is available with a hydraulic notching system, optional cover and optional trailer.

SnapTable PRO comes with a two-year manufacturer’s warranty.

“We wanted to remove limitations from panel preparations,” explains Jonathan Dravecky with Swenson Shear. “With the SnapTable PRO, our metal roof contractors can achieve any angle for any standing-seam panel up to 24 inches. And our trailer option eases transportation to and from the job site.”

Forty Years of Roof Leaks Solved with Standing-seam Copper

Because the show must go on, what served as a canopy-style roof at the Miller Outdoor Theater, Houston, needed repairs in short order. Byrne Metals, Humble, Texas, installed more than 18,000 square feet of copper 238T standing-seam panels during the five-month off season by calling in the rollformer from McElroy Metal that runs panels right onto the roof deck.

Improvements included replacements of the east and west wings, a new soffit for the main sloped roof and the new 20-ounce copper standing-seam roof.

Improvements included replacements of the east and west wings, a new soffit for the main sloped roof and the new 20-ounce copper standing-seam roof.

“Everyone else who had tried to fix the problems focused on trying not to change the appearance,” says Karl Schaack, P.E., president of Price Consulting, Houston. “We realized providing a leak-free solution required some change in the appearance. We got a little pushback at first, but when we explained our design, they were just happy to know it wasn’t going to leak anymore.”

“It was a very challenging job,” says Neil Byrne, president of Byrne Metals. “This is an iconic structure in Houston, originally built in 1968. At the time, it won several awards for its design.”

Unfortunately, right from the start, the design didn’t hold up against the Texas rains. For more than 40 years, anyone who was hired to fix the problem, failed.

Schaack chose 238T symmetrical panels from McElroy Metal for the project. “It’s rigid and it meets high-wind requirements,” he says. “The 238T is symmetrical so if a panel gets damaged, you only have to replace one panel.”

BEFORE: The multi-million dollar renovation in Hermann Park served to correct canopy deficiencies that caused leaks above the stage and audience.

BEFORE: The multi-million dollar renovation in Hermann Park served to correct canopy deficiencies that caused leaks above the stage and audience.

The multi-million dollar renovation in Hermann Park served to correct canopy deficiencies that caused leaks above the stage as well as the audience, putting a real damper on the theater’s cultural and educational event offerings.

Byrne Metals went to work as soon as the 2013 season concluded in early November. Improvements included replacements of the east and west wings, a new soffit for the main sloped roof and the new 20-ounce copper standing-seam roof. The profile was McElroy Metal’s 238T symmetrical standing-seam panel. “Using copper helped the new roof blend in with the original framework,” Schaack says. “Especially as it ages, it will look great, like it’s been there all along.”

Changes in design to the updated roof, as well as a watertight standing seam installation, will help prevent future leaks.

Using copper helped the new roof blend in with the original framework. The profile was McElroy Metal’s 238T symmetrical standing-seam panel.

Using copper helped the new roof blend in with the original framework. The profile was McElroy Metal’s 238T symmetrical standing-seam panel.

The roof area between the existing Corten superstructure was framed with purlins, a metal deck was installed on top of the purlins, then a 1 1/2-inch nail base was installed over the deck along with ice and water shield. A giant reverse-slope diverter was built at the intersection, where the sloping roof connected to the stage wall. Valleys were lowered below the roof plane and there was a slight change in pitch that was overcome by rounding the insulation/plywood over the pitch change.

McElroy Metal’s job-site production equipment simplified the process of installation and made the job site safer. The rollformer was hoisted to the eaves on a scissor lift where panels were conveniently run onto the roof. Not only did this method eliminate the need for an expensive crane to get panels on the roof, it was safer as some of the panels were up to 110-feet long. Because of the unique shape of the roof, panels were cut to fit on the roof.

“We specialize in the unique and difficult,” Byrne says. “This is the kind of job we like. We generally have about 20 to 30 projects under contract at any one time, but this one required a lot of personal attention from our upper management, myself included. We had as many as 30 crew members onsite, working 10-hour days and some weekends, when necessary.”

A rollformer was hoisted to the eaves on a scissor lift where panels were conveniently run onto the roof.

A rollformer was hoisted to the eaves on a scissor lift where panels were conveniently run onto the roof.

As with all Byrne Metals jobs, safety was a major consideration during the evaluation and installation. “There are three things we consider important to staying in business,” Byrne says. “Safety, quality and productivity. We have a fulltime safety person on staff making sure we’re working safely on all jobs. This job required us to take into consideration some other factors like guys working long days, getting fatigued and the speed at which we had to work to complete the job on time. We enjoy a good challenge and Miller Outdoor Theater falls into that category.”

PHOTOS: McElroy Metal

Learning and Trying New Things

The start of a new school year is always an exciting time. As I see my friends post photos on Facebook of their kids’ first days of school, I am reminded of the excitement I felt way back when. I loved wearing a new outfit, seeing friends I hadn’t seen in awhile and anticipating all the fun—and learning—in the year ahead. In a way, I get to recreate those feelings each time I put together a new issue of Roofing. I’m continually learning about the industry and this issue is no different.

For example, in “From the Hutchinson Files”, Thomas W. Hutchinson, AIA, FRCI, RRC, CSI, RRP, principal of Hutchinson Design Group, Barrington, Ill., and a Roofing editorial advisor, explains the virtues of cover boards. As he points out in his article, the use of cover boards can now be considered a good roofing practice.

Meanwhile, Jared O. Blum, president of the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association, Bethesda, Md., explains a new white paper about polyisocyanurate insulation R-values in “Cool Roofing”. He states the R-value of polyiso roof insulation is reduced at some point at lower temperatures, but within any reasonable temperature range associated with typical building operating conditions in almost any climate in North America the difference appears to be very small.

In addition, we here at Roofing like to learn and try new things. As a result, this issue is interactive! Please download the free Layar Augmented Reality app, which was designed to bring print to life. Then hover over page 45 in the print edition with your smartphone or tablet to view a video about Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University’s Indoor Practice Facility in Blacksburg, Va., which features almost 1,000 squares of 238-foot-long, curved, standing-seam metal panels. We’re really excited about this new capability and would love to know what you think.

Project Profiles: Education Facilities

Leon Levine Hall of Medical Sciences, Campbell University, Buies Creek, N.C.

TEAM

ZINC INSTALLER: Baker Roofing, Raleigh, N.C.
ARCHITECT: Little Diversified Architectural Consulting, Charlotte, N.C.

A total of 40,000 square feet of interlocking zinc panels are used on the walls and standing-seam zinc panels are installed on the roof of the building to provide long-lasting durability and an impressive visual aesthetic.

A total of 40,000 square feet of interlocking zinc panels are used on the walls and standing-seam zinc panels are installed on the roof of the building to provide long-lasting durability and an impressive visual aesthetic.

ROOF MATERIALS

A total of 40,000 square feet of interlocking zinc panels are used on the walls and standing-seam zinc panels are installed on the roof of the building to provide long-lasting durability and an impressive visual aesthetic. As North Carolina’s first new medical school in 35 years, Campbell University regards this building as an investment in the state’s future needs for health-care professionals and a modern educational space. Campbell wanted a building with permanence to show its commitment to health sciences in the long term, and zinc provides it with a durable metal that can survive decades of internal and external activities.

ZINC MANUFACTURER: VMZ Interlocking panel in 1-millimeter QUARTZ-ZINC and VMZ Standing Seam panel 1-millimeter in QUARTZ-ZINC from VMZINC

ROOF REPORT

The Leon Levine Hall of Medical Sciences, which was completed in June 2013, consists of approximately 96,500 square feet on four floors. The building is designed to create a modern learning environment with simulation laboratories, traditional laboratories, an osteopathic manipulative medicine lab, student group-study rooms, student interaction areas, a resource library and small café. It hosts the School of Osteopathic Medicine and is designed to provide hands-on education for medical students.

PHOTO: VMZINC

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OMG Roofing Products Releases Video on Installing Thermoplastic Single-ply Membranes

OMG Roofing Products has unveiled a video showcasing how easy it is to install thermoplastic single-ply membranes on standing-seam metal recover projects using the RhinoBond induction welding system.

OMG Roofing Products has unveiled a video showcasing how easy it is to install thermoplastic single-ply membranes on standing-seam metal recover projects using the RhinoBond induction welding system.

OMG Roofing Products has unveiled a video showcasing how easy it is to install thermoplastic single-ply membranes on standing-seam metal recover projects using the RhinoBond induction welding system. The video offers a step-by-step demonstration of the application and highlights the ways the RhinoBond System eliminates the traditional hassles of this type of application, including the following:

  • No special width membrane needed.
  • No membrane to install between purlins.
  • No penetrations of the new membrane.
  • No excess membrane buried in the laps.
  • No membrane orientation issues.
  • No fastener jacking.

Watch the RhinoBond standing seam video.