Steel Industry Icon to Deliver Keynote Address at METALCON 2018

Dan DiMicco, former CEO of Nucor Corporation and senior trade adviser to President Trump’s Campaign, will present “The Economic Plan for Growth and Global Competitiveness in the United States―Implications for Steel”in a keynote address at METALCON 2018 on Thursday, Oct. 11 at 11.00 a.m., in Charlotte, N.C.

DiMicco will provide an overview of the 30-year trade war, review section 232 of the U.S. Trade Expansion Act of 1962, examine the impact of tariffs on the metal construction industry and explain why Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs make sense.  He will also discuss the long-term sustainability of the steel industry.   Attendees will have the opportunity to participate in this informative Q & A session.

For former steel executive DiMicco, there’s no risk of the President’s tariffs sparking a trade war.  “We’ve already been in one for years,” said DiMicco.  “The only difference now is that we’re deciding to fight back.”

Trump’s proposal to impose a 25 percent tariff on steel imports and 10 percent tariff on imports of aluminum has been met with opposition, but DiMicco is among those who think they’re putting the United States back on track.

DiMicco spent most of his career in steel and manufacturing.  He served as a senior trade and economic adviser to President Trump’s campaign and was the lead on the U.S. trade representative transition team.  He joined Nucor in 1982 and worked his way up to president and CEO in 2000.  Under his leadership, Nucor delivered dramatic growth in profits and shareholder returns. Today, Nucor is the United States’ largest producer of steel and also considered North America’s largest recycler.

Additionally, DiMicco proved himself an effective champion for domestic manufacturing and rules-based, rules-enforced free trade.  He has served on the board of the U.S. Manufacturing Council, the National Association of Manufacturers and the World Steel Association. Currently, DiMicco serves on the board for Duke Energy Corporation and continues to represent Nucor as chairman emeritus.

“Dan not only revived a major U.S. manufacturing firm during a recession, but helped galvanize the flagging domestic steel industry when many of his competitors were in bankruptcy or headed overseas,” said METALCON Show Director, Claire Kilcoyne.

DiMicco, author of American Made: Why Making Things Will Return Us to Greatness will be available for a book signing following his keynote addressIn his book,he tackles the false promise of green jobs and the hidden costs of outsourcing.  He shares lessons learned about good leadership, crisis management, the true meaning of innovation, and he paves a path forward to robust economic growth, middle-class prosperity and American competitiveness. 

“Given the controversy over this hot topic right now, Dan’s extensive knowledge and expertise in this area couldn’t come at a better time,” said Kilcoyne.  “We look forward to hearing his take on how tariffs are impacting the metal construction industry and our overall economy.”

For more information, visit www.metalcon.com.

 

Autobrake Designed to Improve Part Quality and Reduce Labor Costs

Roper Whitney introduces the Autobrake 1212, which provides accuracy and repeatability when forming 12-gauge mill steel and 14-gauge stainless steel. It features the rotating Kombi beam, which expands the machine’s folding capabilities to produce straight to box and pan bending in just 11 seconds. The box tooling is 6.3-inches in height, precision ground and laser hardened to 60. Pieces are also laser etched with the length of the tool for easy box set up.

Optional left-hand or right-hand back gauge extension provides superior material positioning. Maximum 12-foot back gauge travels in less than three seconds and is provided by the six-stage design combining high speed with compact space requirements.

The Autobrake 1212 offers the following benefits:

  • Reduced labor costs
  • Improved part accuracy
  • Minimized tool changes

The Synergy control system offers many features to the operator such as multiple methods of programming – from simple line-by-line to draw-to-auto program. It’s network capabilities allow for multiple integrations, such as; Konnect, Konstruct, Konstruct Mobile, and overall shop management through linking multiple machines.

The Autobrake design is a plate and weldment steel construction, delivering performance and features in a simplified, rigid design. End housings are a plate-type construction bringing drive components close together for improved stiffness and performance. The design is constructed so that the actuating mechanisms are secured in rigid mounds of the housings allowing for easy maintenance.

For more information, visit www.roperwhitney.com.

Coating System Makes Roofing and Cladding Appear Aged, Weathered

McElroy Metal's Cor-Ten AZP Raw offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

McElroy Metal’s Cor-Ten AZP Raw offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

Bossier City, La.-based McElroy Metal’s Cor-Ten AZP Raw is new to the company’s product line, offering the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

Cor-Ten AZP Raw is a fluoropolymer coating system that uses cool pigment technology that McElroy Metal applies over Galvalume-coated steel sheet. It’s available in a variety of McElroy Metal standing-seam and through-fastened panel profiles. The look of aged or weathered roofing and wall cladding is growing in popularity and used in commercial, residential and industrial applications. Cor-Ten AZP Raw provides the appearance of rusted metal with the advantages of a highly reflective PVDF coating.

Cor-Ten AZP Raw is a fluoropolymer coating system that McElroy Metal applies over Galvalume-coated steel sheet.

Cor-Ten AZP Raw is a fluoropolymer coating system that McElroy Metal applies over Galvalume-coated steel sheet.


“We’re offering the appearance of weathered steel without having to wait for time and Mother Nature,” says Ken Gieseke, vice president of Marketing at McElroy Metal. “As soon as it’s installed, the weathered aesthetic is evident, attractive and durable. It’s sure to become a popular choice of architects and building owners seeking the look of weathered steel.”

In 2005, U.S. Steel introduced Cor-Ten AZP prepainted steel sheet to provide architects, building owners and homeowners with an enhanced performance product to its Cor-Ten steel. McElroy Metal offers the moderately weathered Cor-Ten AZP Raw, a carefully crafted and engineered system to provide any roofing or cladding project with the authentic look of timelessness.

Raw is produced by McElroy Metal in collaboration with Valspar and U.S. Steel.

To learn more, visit here or call (318) 747-8000.

PHOTOS: McElroy Metal

Scissor Shears Cut Thin Coated Metals

When cutting thin coated metals, the swiping cut action of the scissor shears seals the edges of the cut material, reducing the likelihood of rust or corrosion.

When cutting thin coated metals, the swiping cut action of the scissor shears seals the edges of the cut material, reducing the likelihood of rust or corrosion.

Kett Tool Company helps plastic fabricators, siding installers and sign companies conserve materials with the swiping cut action of the KD-441 Scissor Shears. When cutting thin coated metals, the swiping cut action of the KD-441 seals the edges of the cut material, reducing the likelihood of rust or corrosion.
                                                                                                  Kett’s KD-441 use a five-amp pistol grip, 0‐2,500 RPM variable-speed electric motor that cuts through cold rolled (C.R.) mild steel (up to 24 gauge), wire mesh to 18 gauge, spiral pipe, metal studs, plastics and rubber, with a scissor action – all at speeds up to 2,500 strokes per minute. The scissor shears weigh five pounds and have an adjustable cutting speed that can be tailored for individual cutting needs. All shear heads are precision made in the U.S. featuring A-2 tool steel blades for durability.  
 
The KD-441 Scissor Shears are available through authorized dealers. For more information or to locate a dealer, visit the website or call (513)271-0333.

Shear Cuts Metal while Conserving Materials and Costs

Kett Tool Co.’s KD-400 18-Gauge Double-Cut Shears help manufacturers and contractors conserve materials and cut costs. The shears deliver precision cuts in cold rolled (C.R.) mild steel, stainless steel, aluminum, plastic and Formica without warping or bending the original material or the finished piece.

Kett Tool Co.’s KD-400 18-Gauge Double-Cut Shears help manufacturers and contractors conserve materials and cut costs.

Kett Tool Co.’s KD-400 18-Gauge Double-Cut Shears help manufacturers and contractors conserve materials and cut costs.

The Double-Cut Shears’ dual blades transfer any distortion produced in cutting to a small 7/32-inch waste strip, leaving behind material edges that are not hardened or burred to allow maximum use of sheet material. The blades’ swiping action also seals edges of coated metals.

Kett’s KD-400 shears use a 5-amp, variable speed, 2,500 RPM electric motor to produce straight or contoured cuts in C.R. mild steel (up to 18-gauge), most grades of stainless steel to 20-gauge, aluminum to 0.080 inches, and plastic or Formica up to 3/32 inches thick—all at speeds of up to 300 inches per minute. The lightweight, maneuverable shears easily follow a scribed line, capable of cutting a radius as small as 6 inches.

The KD-400 Double-Cut Shears are also available with a contour cutting blade 60-21C to cut tighter curves and the HS blade 60-21HS for cutting foam filled doors. All shear heads are precision made in the U.S. featuring A2 tool steel blades for prolonged durability.

The KD-400 Double-Cut Shears are available through authorized dealers.

Contemporary Materials Are Used to Preserve a Historically Significant 1889 House

In my capacity as a historic preservation contractor and consultant, I am often afforded the opportunity to become involved in exciting and challenging projects. Recently, my firm was awarded the contract to restore the clay tile roof turrets at Boston’s Longy School of Music’s Zabriskie House. Now part of Bard College, Longy School’s Zabriskie House is actually the historic Edwin H. Abbot House with a sympathetically designed addition built in the 1980s. The deteriorated condition of the original house’s turrets, as well as lead-coated copper gutter linings and masonry dormers, had attracted the attention of the Cambridge Historic Commission, and a commitment to the proper restoration of these systems was struck between the commission, building owner and a private donor.

The hipped roof turret on the building’s primary façade was in need of serious attention.

The hipped roof turret on the building’s primary façade was in need of serious attention.

BUILDING HISTORY

Before I can specify historically appropriate treatments, I need to don my consultant’s cap and dig into the history of a building to best understand its evolution. Developing the background story will typically answer questions and fill in the blanks when examining traditional building systems. An 1890 newspaper clipping held by the Cambridge Historic Commission re- ports that “[t]he stately home of Mr. Abbot, with its walled-in grounds, on the site of the old Arsenal, promises to be the most costly private dwelling in the city.” An examination of records held by the Massachusetts Historical Commission and from the Library of Congress’ Historic American Buildings Survey reveals that the firm of Longfellow, Alden & Harlow designed the Richardsonian Romanesque portion of the building and that Norcross Brothers Contractors and Builders was the builder of record.

Alexander Wadsworth Longfellow Jr. (of Longfellow, Alden & Harlow) was the nephew of the famous poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and an important figure in U.S. architectural history. After graduating from Harvard University in 1876, he studied architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, after which he worked as a senior draftsman in Henry Hobson Richardson’s office. After Richardson’s death in 1886, Longfellow partnered with Frank Ellis Alden and Alfred Branch Harlow to found the firm of Longfellow, Alden & Harlow. With offices in Boston and Pittsburgh, the firm designed many important buildings, including the Carnegie Library in Pittsburgh and the City Hall in Cambridge.

Norcross Brothers Contractors and Builders was a prominent 19th century American construction company, especially noted for its work, mostly in stone, for the architectural firms of Henry Hobson Richardson and McKim, Mead & White. Much of the value of the Norcross Brothers to architectural firms derived from Orlando Norcross’ engineering skill. Although largely self- taught, he had developed the skills needed to solve the vast engineering problems brought to him by his clients. For example, the size of the dome at the Rhode Island Capitol was expanded very late in the design process, perhaps even after construction had begun, so that it would be larger than the one just completed by Cass Gilbert for the Minnesota Capitol. Norcross was able to execute the new design.

BUILDING STYLE

The Edwin Abbot House is an interesting interpretation of the Richardsonian Romanesque style. Whereas the great majority of such buildings feature rusticated, pink Milford granite in an ashlar pattern, trimmed with East Longmeadow brownstone, Longfellow created a unique spin for Mr. Abbot. Although the building is trimmed with brownstone, the field of the walls features coursed Weymouth granite of slightly varying heights. The motif of orange, brown and golden hues of the stone is continued in the brick wall surrounding the property.

Scaffolding was erected that would make the otherwise dangerous, heavy nature of the work safe and manageable.

Scaffolding was erected that would make the otherwise dangerous, heavy nature of the work safe and manageable.

The roof is covered in a flat, square orange-red clay tile. Richardsonian Romanesque buildings are almost exclusively roofed in clay tile; Monson black slate; Granville, N.Y., red slate; or some combination thereof. It should be noted that because their need for stone was outpacing the supply, Norcross Brothers eventually acquired its own quarries in Connecticut, Georgia, Maine, Massachusetts and New York.

The roof framing system of steel and terra-cotta blocks is relatively rare but makes perfect sense when considered in context with the latest flooring technologies of the era. A network of steel beams was bolted together to form the rafters, hips and ridges of the frame. Across each is welded rows of double angle irons (or inverted T beams). Within these channels, in beds of Portland cement, the terra-cotta block was laid. The tile was then fastened directly to the blocks with steel nails. Because of the ferrous nature of the fasteners, the normal passage of moisture vapor caused the nails to rust and expand slightly, anchoring them securely in place. Whether this element of the design was intentional or simply fortunate happenstance, the result made for a long-lasting roof.

What doesn’t last forever in traditional slate and clay tile roofing systems is the sheet-metal flashing assemblies. Over the years, there must have been numerous failures, which led to the decision to remove the clay tiles from the broad fields of the roof and replace them with red asphalt shingles in the 1980s. Confronted with the dilemma of securing the shingles to the terra-cotta substrate, a decision was made to sheathe the roof with plywood. Holes were punched through the blocks and toggles used to fasten the plywood to the roof. In an area where the asphalt shingles were removed, more than 50 percent of the plywood exhibited varying degrees of rot caused by the normal passage of vapor from the interior spaces.

Fortunately, the turrets had survived the renovations from 30 years before. A conical turret in the rear and an eight-sided hip-roofed turret on the north side needed only repairs which, while extensive, did not require addressing issues with the substrate. The 16-sided turret on the primary façade of the building was in poor condition. Over the years, prior “repairs” included the use of non-matching tiles, red roofing cement, tar, caulk and even red slate. A scaffold was erected to allow safe, unfettered access to the entire turret and the process of removing the tile began. Care was taken to conserve as many tiles as possible for use in repairing the previously described turrets.

As the clay-tile roof covering was removed, the materials of the substrate were revealed and conditions were assessed.

As the clay-tile roof covering was removed, the materials of the substrate were revealed and conditions were assessed.

The substrate was examined closely and, save for thousands of tiny craters created by the original nails, found to be sound. A new system had to be devised that could be attached to the terra-cotta blocks and allow for the replacement tiles to be securely fastened, as well as resist the damaging forces of escaping moisture vapor. Cement board, comprised of 90 percent Portland cement and ground sand, was fastened to the blocks with ceramic-coated masonry screws. The entire turret was then covered with a self-adhering membrane. The replacement tiles were carefully matched and sourced from a salvage deal- er in Illinois and secured with stain- less-steel fasteners. The flat tiles, no longer manufactured new, are referred to as “Cambridge” tiles for their prevalence on the roofs of great homes and institutional buildings in and around Cambridge.

CONTEMPORARY UPDATES

Although I typically advocate for the retainage of all historic fabric when preserving and restoring traditional building systems, there are exceptions. In the case of the Abbot House roof, we encountered “modern” technologies that pointed us toward contemporary means and methods. Rusting steel nails in the terra-cotta block were brilliant for initial installation but seemed ill conceived for a second-go-round. Instead, using non-ferrous fasteners and a new substrate that is impervious to moisture infiltration will guarantee the turret’s new service life for the next 125 years or more.

ROOF MATERIALS

Self-adhering Membrane: Grace Ice & Water Shield
Masonry Anchors: Tapcon
Cement Board: James Hardie
Stainless-steel Roofing Nails: Grip Rite
Replacement Tiles: Renaissance Roofing Inc.

PHOTOS: Ward Hamilton

Lightweight Shears Easily Cut Cold Rolled Mild Steel

Kett Tool offers maneuverability for cutting corrugated metal with the left curved blade configuration of the KD-446L Profile Shears.

Kett Tool offers maneuverability for cutting corrugated metal with the left curved blade configuration of the KD-446L Profile Shears.

Kett Tool offers contractors, installers and manufacturers maneuverability for cutting corrugated metal with the left curved blade configuration of the KD-446L Profile Shears. The lightweight shears can easily cut cold rolled (C.R.) mild steel up to 18 gauge at a radius as tight as three inches.

The KD-446L features a powerful 5-amp pistol grip, variable speed, 2,500 RPM motor that easily cuts profile and flat materials up to 18 gauge C.R. mild steel, soft non-ferrous metals like aluminum, copper and brass (up to .090-inch thick); spiral duct, wire mesh and many other sheet materials—all at speeds of up to 28 feet per minute. The tool is lightweight at 5 pounds and has a 3-inch cutting radius, allowing for maximum maneuverability when cutting tight curves. The cutting blades are made from high-quality steel, heat treated and precision ground for extended operation.

Shears Cut and Contour Steel

Kett Tool’s KL-200 Double-Cut Shears deliver precision cuts and contours in C.R. mild steel (up to 18 gauge), stainless steel (to 20 gauge) and more materials without warping or bending the original material or finished piece.

Kett Tool’s KL-200 Double-Cut Shears deliver precision cuts and contours in C.R. mild steel (up to 18 gauge), stainless steel (to 20 gauge) and more materials without warping or bending the original material or finished piece.

Kett Tool’s KL-200 Double-Cut Shears deliver precision cuts and contours in C.R. mild steel (up to 18 gauge), stainless steel (to 20 gauge) and more materials without warping or bending the original material or finished piece. The dual blades transfer any distortion produced in cutting to a small 7/32-inch waste strip, leaving behind material edges that are not hardened or burred to allow maximum use of sheet material. The blades’ swiping action also seals edges of coated metals. The shears’ 4-amp straight handle and single-speed electric motor operate at speeds up to 300 inches per minute. All shear heads are precision made in the U.S. featuring A-2 tool steel blades for prolonged durability.

Traditional Wood Shakes Are Made of High-strength Steel

The Roser Stone Wood Shake pairs the aesthetic beauty of the traditional wood shake with the low maintenance and exceptional performance of high-strength steel.

The Roser Stone Wood Shake pairs the aesthetic beauty of the traditional wood shake with the low maintenance and exceptional performance of high-strength steel.

The Roser Stone Wood Shake pairs the aesthetic beauty of the traditional wood shake with the low maintenance and exceptional performance of high-strength steel. Tested against the elements, Stone Wood Shake by Roser has been tempered against hurricanes, fires, hail storms and earthquakes and has proven its durability and protection for your greatest investment—your home.

The roofing system includes:

  • Clear acrylic over-glaze protective coating
  • Roofing granule coating
  • Adhesive basecoat
  • Protective surface coating
  • Aluminum/zinc coating
  • Commercial-grade steel core
  • Protective surface coating

The Stone Coated Steel Roofing System, manufactured by Roser, offers the advantage of high-strength steel with a look a variety of traditional and innovative architectural styles. When compared to asphalt shingles and concrete roofing products, which can weigh 350 to 1,000 pounds per square, the Roser Stone Coated Roofing System, at only 150 pounds per square, effectively reduces the overhead weight on the house structure. This provides for a much safer building during an earthquake, fire or a hurricane. While the standard shingle and shake roofs naturally deteriorate over time, the Roser Roofing System will continue to maintain its beautiful appearance and requires the least amount of maintenance in the roofing industry. An eco-friendly Roser roof will increase the resale value of your home not only with its elegance, but also with its proven durability.

About Roser Roofing System:

  • Installs direct to deck or over battens.
  • Stone surface resists fading and provides for a quiet roof.
  • Fastener design features a confirmed and a locking profile.
  • Low-maintenance roof system with water-shedding performance.
  • Storm driven engineering design is proven throughout the world.
  • Includes the stringent Miami-Dade Approval.

Tile Roofing System Is Made of Lightweight High-strength Steel

Roser Cleo Tile

Roser Cleo Tile

The Roser Cleo Tile will give your home a fresh and radiant appearance while leaving you in the comfort of protection that only a stone-coated steel roof can offer. The beautiful appeal of classic tile with the performance of lightweight high-strength steel, resistant to fire and hurricane-force winds, is an ideal choice for any homeowner.

The roofing system includes:

  • Clear acrylic over-glaze protective coating
  • Roofing granule coating
  • Adhesive basecoat
  • Protective surface coating
  • Aluminum/zinc coating
  • Commercial-grade steel core
  • Aluminum/zinc coating
  • Protective surface coating

The Stone Coated Steel Roofing System, manufactured by Roser, offers the advantage of high-strength steel with a look a variety of traditional and innovative architectural styles. When compared to asphalt shingles and concrete roofing products, which can weigh 350 to 1,000 pounds per square, the Roser Stone Coated Roofing System, at only 150 pounds per square, effectively reduces the overhead weight on the house structure. This provides for a much safer building during an earthquake, fire or a hurricane. While the standard shingle and shake roofs naturally deteriorate over time, the Roser Roofing System will continue to maintain its beautiful appearance and requires the least amount of maintenance in the roofing industry. An eco-friendly Roser roof will increase the resale value of your home not only with its elegance, but also with its proven durability.

About the Roser Roofing System:

  • Installs direct to deck or over battens.
  • Stone surface resists fading and provides for a quiet roof.
  • Fastener design features a confirmed and a locking profile.
  • Low-maintenance roof system with water-shedding performance.
  • Storm driven engineering design is proven throughout the world.
  • Includes the stringent Miami-Dade Approval.