Roof of Texas Business Gets New Life After Hailstorm

After the damaged roof system was removed, CIMA installed a self-adhering SBS modified bitumen roofing system manufactured by CertainTeed. Photo: CertainTeed

Large hailstorms are a common occurrence in Northern Texas, so when the roof of CMS Magnetics Corporation in Garland, Texas, started to leak, the company suspected hail had something to do with it.

When CMS purchased its building in 2012, the company applied to its existing roof system a roof coating designed to strengthen the system and protect it from water intrusion. In 2018, however, the roof started leaking to the point that expert guidance was needed to address the situation.

To help CMS consider its options, Plano, Texas-based CIMA Contractors, LLC, was called in to find the source of the leaks and recommend an efficient, affordable solution. CIMA Contractors is a CertainTeed-credentialed roofing contractor with more than 20 years of experience in commercial roofing and storm damage restoration. After analyzing the roof’s existing PVC membrane, CIMA determined that the roof leaks were indeed the result of hail damage from a 2014 storm.

CMS leadership worried it would have to fix or replace the entire roof system at great expense to the company. Trusting in its expertise, CIMA stood by its findings and went the extra step of presenting additional findings to the insurance company so their hail damage claim could be covered.

CIMA met with adjusters, roofing contractors and engineers from the insurance company and conducted a joint assessment. During the assessment, the team conducted forensic work to determine that recent hail had compromised the roof system and was the cause of recurring leaks. This inspired the insurance company to agree to restore the roof to its pre-storm condition.

The existing roof assembly was comprised of a 22-inch intermediate-rib steel deck supporting a 60-mil PVC roof system along with a spray-on coating. CIMA decided to take a different approach — one that would offer a solution with greater energy efficiency, better tolerance for the foot traffic required for facility maintenance, and superior impact and weather resistance.

This photo shows the damaged roof before it was replaced. Photo: CertainTeed

After removing the old roof system, CIMA mechanically attached CertainTeed’s FlintBoard ISO insulation to the building’s steel deck. In addition to helping the structure meet city building code requirements, the insulation provided year-round indoor comfort. CIMA also installed tapered FlintBoard ISO-T insulation to reconfigure the cricket geometry and sumps in the roof’s corners and redirect water runoff to a new drainage system, eliminating standing water on the roof’s surface.

CIMA then applied CertainTeed’s Black Diamond Base Sheet, a self-adhering SBS modified bitumen roofing membrane designed to provide durability, strength, ease of handling and resistance to moisture and wind-driven rain. A torch-applied layer of CertainTeed’s Flintlastic GTA cap sheet topped off the system, providing additional puncture and tear resistance. The new, more resilient system delivered a combined 220 mils of protection.

Thanks to CIMA’s professional expertise and high-quality roofing products from CertainTeed, the CMS facility is dry, safe and comfortable for its employees. For additional peace of mind, the new roof is backed by a 15-year NDL (no-dollar limit) warranty from CIMA and CertainTeed. With their roof problems addressed and their storage areas dry, CMS has expanded its capacity and inventory, paving the way for greater operational bandwidth and profit.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: CIMA Contractors, LLC, Plano, Texas, www.cimacontractors.com

MATERIALS

Base Sheet: Black Diamond, CertainTeed, www.certainteed.com

Cap Sheet: Flintlastic GTA, CertainTeed

Insulation: FlintBoard ISO and FlintBoard ISO-T, CertainTeed

Metal Tiles Help Modernize Texas Bank’s Building and Brand

The design for the bank’s exterior incorporates metal tiles from Petersen to clad the building’s two entrances. A standing seam metal roof wraps around the building, intersecting with the metal tile. Photo: Tom Coplen, buenavistaphotography.com

When Southside Bank in Texas began a campaign to modernize its brand, management understood that the buildings it occupies play a significant role in branding. The existing flagship branch in Tyler, Texas, was re-imagined and renovated inside and out to reflect the contemporary way the bank now interacts with its customers.

Architect Chad Humphries AIA, RID, project architect and partner, Fitzpatrick Architects in Tyler, Texas, extracted the vision for the renovation from the Southside team and created the bank’s signature design element using metal tiles from Petersen to clad the building’s two entrances. A standing seam metal roof wrapped around the building, and intersected with the metal tile at the entrances.

Humphries specified 10,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roof panels in 22-gauge steel finished in PAC-CLAD Slate Gray color. Also specified was 2,000 square feet of Petersen’s Precision Series TS Tile in .023 aluminum finished in anodized dark bronze. Additionally, 500 square feet of Petersen’s composite rain screen in Classic Bronze finish was installed.

The building was topped with 10,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roof panels in 22-gauge steel. Photo: Tom Coplen, buenavistaphotography.com

“The tiles were the main design element we wanted on the entryways, to function as both wall and roof material, to blur the line between roof and wall,” Humphries says. “Metal tiles have been around in Europe for centuries, and we employed the PAC-CLAD Precision Series TS Tile as a modern option. Metal has a timelessness that is appealing, and in this project it achieved the aesthetic vision and performance needs we established.”

The tile concept on the entryways was such a success on this project that it will be duplicated on many other Southside Bank buildings. Humphries likes the metal tile’s low profile and the way it also adds texture to the wall. “I especially like the way the light interacts on the tile’s surface, which allows for a wall that changes its appearance as the sun progresses across the sky throughout the day,” he says.

When selecting products for any project, Humphries values how long a product has been on the market. “Even though the Precision Series TS Tile hasn’t been around a long time, it was Petersen’s version of a product with proven history and that was good enough for us,” he notes.

Design Challenges

Where the tile on the entryways met the standing seam roof, a junction not often encountered was created. The tile-to-panel junction was easy to deal with because ultimately it was a simple metal-to-metal joint, according to Humphries. “Additionally, the tile allowed for a 45-degree turn without requiring edge band,” he says.

A metal roof was chosen because of metal’s longevity, and the need to blend in to the building’s design, notes Humphries, who typically specifies some kind of metal element on every project. Design challenges included peeling back and sorting through the multiple phases of additions and renovations inside and outside of the building, ultimately to be truer to the original design of the building. “For example, in the 1970s they added a concrete superstructure. But in the 90s, rather than removing it, they built a giant green mansard roof over it. Over time the building’s design became a mixture of ideas with no clear vision in mind. Our job was to simplify and unify everything,” he explains.

Approximately 2,000 square feet of Petersen’s Precision Series TS Tile in .023 aluminum finished in anodized dark bronze were installed. Photo: Tom Coplen, buenavistaphotography.com

This project was the first one for installing contractor Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal in Longview, Texas, on which metal tile was involved, says Anthony McKinley, vice president, estimator and project manager. “The tiles tied into a valley with the existing roof, so we made sure they were cut properly and flanged,” he says. “Installation of the tile and standing seam roof was straightforward for our experienced crew. It was a slower process working with the tiles because we wanted to make sure the lines were straight, level and square. The details were custom so we took a little longer to make sure we measured correctly and got it looking right.”

All metal work on the building was performed by McKinley’s team. “This job was large in scope mainly because of the removal and replacement of the mansard roofing,” McKinley says. “After taking off the roof panels, we removed fake dormers to create a straight, plain look. We tore everything down to the wood deck. Ultimately, we were at least six months on the jobsite. Most of our time was spent removing the existing metal, which required a man lift, which is a slow process.”

“We felt it was important to make sure the owner and architect liked what we were doing by not making design decisions on our own,” McKinley says. “Some jobs you know what to do, but on this one we wanted to make sure the architect liked it. We figured out details to make it work for integrity and water intrusion, but also to give the architect the look he wanted. We figured out the details on our own because those typically aren’t specified.” Edge metal was fabricated by McKinley’s crew. “We love working with PAC-CLAD,” McKinley says. “They have superior products, and the technical help Petersen provides is very valuable.”

TEAM

Architect: Fitzpatrick Architects in Tyler, Texas, https://fitzpatrickarchitects.com

Roofing Contractor: Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal, Longview, Texas, www.curtismckinleyroofing.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: Snap-Clad 22-gauge steel finished in PAC-CLAD Slate Gray color, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Metal Tiles: Precision Series TS Tile, .023 aluminum finished in anodized dark bronze, Petersen

TAMKO Donates Roof System for Operation Finally Home Project

Wounded Texas veteran Charlotte Ferris and her four children have a new reason to be thankful this holiday season.

Ferris is one of the latest Dallas-Fort Worth area veterans to receive a custom-built, mortgage-free house through nonprofit organization Operation FINALLY HOME, and the generosity of builders and manufacturers including McBee Homes and TAMKO Building Products, Inc.

Last week, Ferris was surprised with a groundbreaking at the site of her new home. Believing they were going for a preliminary interview with Operation FINALLY HOME, Ferris and her family were greeted with a cheering crowd, an American flag flying high over the site and plenty of tears.

This is the first time TAMKO has participated in an Operation FINALLY HOME project, and is donating the roof for Specialist Ferris’ new home. TAMKO has a long history of supporting veterans – veterans make up 15 percent of the company’s workforce, and TAMKO has provided financial and flight support for both the Hero Flights and Honor Flights organizations. TAMKO has a manufacturing facility in Dallas, and a growing corporate extension office in Irving, Texas.

“Specialist Ferris, and others like her, are American heroes, and it’s our great honor to say ‘Thank You’ in this way,” said TAMKO President and CEO David Humphreys. “This is especially meaningful to us because it’s in the Dallas-area that we’ve called home for more than 30 years.”

Operation FINALLY HOME has completed 151 mortgage­free homes and 18 home modifications, and has an additional 50 projects either under construction or in planning.  The nonprofit partners with builder associations, builders, developers, corporate sponsors and volunteers to raise the funds, provide materials and complete the planning and labor for each project. Each home is custom-built to accommodate the physical needs of wounded veterans, and then provided mortgage-free to veterans and widows of the fallen. In addition to TAMKO, this project was made possible through the generosity of several businesses in the region, including McBee Homes, the lead builder on the project, and financial contributors Heritage Real Estate and Roger Williams Automall.

“We are so blessed to work with great builders, builders associations and manufacturers such as TAMKO to lift the burden of a mortgage off the shoulders of our wounded veterans,” said Dan Wallrath, founder of Operation FINALLY HOME. “While Specialist Ferris will not have a mortgage, she has certainly paid a price for this home.”

While deployed in Iraq, Specialist Ferris was driving an armored truck that was struck by an Improvised Explosive Device (IED). Ferris searched for her crew, who all survived, before realizing her ankle was broken and her ear drum ruptured. She was medically evacuated and underwent surgery.

Ferris was recalled to active duty but was deemed medically unfit due to her injuries. She suffers from PTSD, Traumatic Brain Injury, post-concussive headaches, an ankle fracture and tinnitus. For her service and bravery, Ferris was awarded the Purple Heart, as well as the Army Commendation Medal and National Defense Service Medal. Ferris and her four children currently live in White Settlement, Texas. Together they enjoy playing musical instruments and having tea parties.

Operation FINALLY HOME and McBee Homes expect Ferris’ new home to be completed in 2019.

“We are deeply honored to have been asked to build a dream home for an American Hero, and even more humbled by the love and generosity shown by all of our employees, sub-contractors and vendors,” said Mearl McBee, founder/owner of McBee Homes. “We had 100 percent participation by every trade in our system in creating a home that Charlotte Ferris and her children will enjoy for many years to come.”

Click here to download photos from the surprise groundbreaking for the Ferris Family.

 For more information, visit www.TAMKO.com.

 

ABC Supply Co. Inc. Opens Branch in Waxahachie, Texas

Building products distributor ABC Supply Co. Inc. has opened its newest branch at 201 Butcher Road in Waxahachie, Texas. The location offers steep- and low-slope roofing, roofing insulation, siding, windows, doors, and other select exterior building products and materials.

David Wassermann will manage the branch. Wassermann joined ABC Supply in 2015 as an outside sales associate at the company’s Carrollton, Texas, location. As the Waxahachie branch manager, Wassermann will build relationships with the area’s contractors, helping them find solutions for their business challenges and achieve their goals.

ABC Supply now has 40 locations throughout Texas with the opening of the Waxahachie branch.

“David and his team are ready to hit the ground running with the area’s contractors, making sure they receive the personalized support they need to make their jobs easier and help their businesses succeed,” said John Yonkin, vice president of ABC Supply’s Southwest Region. “We’re also looking forward to becoming members of the Waxahachie community.”

Branch hours are 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CT, Monday through Friday, and Saturday 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. The phone number is (972) 937-1052.

For more information, visit www.abcsupply.com.

A Case Involving Uber Has States Revisiting Employee versus Independent Contractor Status

When it comes to employment misclassification, no industry is safe. Employee misclassification occurs when an employer improperly classifies a worker as an independent contractor rather than as an employee. Misclassification can be intentional and unintentional and it generally results in avoidance of employment taxes and other potential liabilities.

While misclassification is prevalent in the construction industry, the issue recently resurfaced in a case involving San Francisco-based Uber Technologies Inc., the increasingly popular transportation network company wherein drivers use their own personal vehicles to transport customers to and from their destinations. Uber drivers and customers use a mobile-phone application that allows drivers to indicate whether they are accepting rides and allows customers to locate drivers and pay their respective fares. Uber has always classified its drivers as independent contractors.

In a recent hearing, the California Labor Commission challenged Uber’s classification of its drivers and reviewed whether Uber drivers were actually employees. Uber looked to the drivers’ exclusive control over their schedules and which ride requests to accept to support their contention the drivers were independent contractors. To Uber’s dismay, the commission ruled Uber drivers were, in fact, employees, entitling them to various benefits, including health insurance, unemployment benefits and workers’ compensation. As a result, Uber also was forced to cover certain business expenses, including toll reimbursements and mileage. Of the labor commissions addressing the Uber issue, the California Labor Commission’s decision directly conflicts with rulings in five other states: Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Pennsylvania and Texas. All of these states’ commissions held that Uber drivers were independent contractors.

As employee misclassification gains more visibility, more states are reevaluating how to properly classify workers. The North Carolina General Assembly, for example, is attempting to pass a law that would expressly define the factors that would determine whether a worker is an employee or independent contractor. A few of the factors being considered by the North Carolina Legislature in House Bill 482 include:

  • Whether the individual is engaged in an independent business, calling or occupation.
  • Whether the individual is paid a fixed price, a lump sum or upon a quantitative basis for the work performed.
  • Whether the individual is not subject to discharge because he or she adopts one method of doing the work rather than another.
  • Whether the individual is free to hire assistants as he or she may think necessary and whether the individual has full control over such assistants.
  • Whether the individual selects his or her own time.

In addition to the much-needed clarification, the bill also proposes a penalty provision, where repeated intentional misclassifications by employers of their employees as independent contractors will trigger a $1,000 per employee liability. The bill would also create a five-member investigatory team and an amnesty period that would provide an opportunity for employers to self-report their current misclassifications. The “temporary amnesty program” will provide misclassifying employers with
immunity from civil penalty and enable to re-classify their workers to their correct designation.

Other states, like Texas, who have already enacted a similar law, are successfully discovering and reclassifying misclassified employees. In 2013, the Texas Labor Commission conducted 6,158 audits—752 of which were in the construction industry. Of the 752 businesses, 37.6 percent were found to have at least one misclassified employee. A total of 3,638 employees—an average of about 16 per business—were misclassified as independent contractors. The construction industry had one of the highest percentages of misclassified employees among all industries.

An investigative series, “Contract to Cheat”, published in a number of Sacramento, Calif.-based The McClatchy Co.’s newspapers in 2014, revealed just how prevalent the misclassification issue is in the construction industry in high-development areas, such as North Carolina and Texas. The series resulted from a year-long investigation into U.S. Housing and Urban Development, Washington, D.C., and other government projects that were completed during the government stimulus era of 2009-13. Payroll records of 64 HUD projects with budgets of more than $1 million were released to the McClatchy investigators and revealed employee misclassification was rampant throughout the construction industry.

The series revealed, among other findings, that employers in North Carolina and Texas with government contracts, which general contractors accepted on the condition they would adhere to all government laws and ensure all their subcontractors would do the same, were misclassifying employees 35.2 and 37.7 percent of the time, respectively. Additionally, Florida, where, like North Carolina and Texas, the construction workforce includes a higher-than-average concentration of immigrant workers, also experienced misclassification of 15.5 percent of workers.

The McClatchy investigation estimated misclassification resulted in $467 million per year to North Carolina and $1.2 billion per year in Texas of lost tax revenue from employers and workers failing to pay employment-related taxes. Not only did employers fail to withhold mandated taxes, such as social security and unemployment taxes, but North Carolina independent contractors who attempted to comply with tax law underreported their income by 56 percent to the state and federal governments. In addition to abusing the tax system, the practice has made it more difficult for smaller, law-abiding employers to compete with employers who are strategically undercutting the competition, placing lower bids made possible by the illegal tax benefit of misclassifying employees.

Though not currently being considered by state legislatures, the opportunity to create a third classification may present itself in the future. Canada has employed the use of a third, intermediate category: the dependent contractor, which is technically a subset of the independent contractor classification. The dependent contractor is a hybrid classification that includes benefits of the independent contractor and employee classifications. Dependent contractors enjoy some of the protections provided to an employee, such as health insurance, severance protections, unemployment benefits, and workers’ compensation, but they still enjoy the flexibility of schedule and control otherwise held by independent contractors.

In Canada, the classification hinges upon the number of clients the contractor has. A dependent contractor—like many contract construction workers—has only one client and depends on that client for income and sustenance of their business. A contractor with more than one client is an independent contractor because they are not exclusively dependent upon any one client. Were a state to create a dependent contractor classification, legislators would then be tasked with determining which select employee benefits employers would be required to provide dependent contractors versus full-time employees.

Although Uber is appealing the California Labor Commission’s decision, the commission’s ruling is important because it has sparked a renewed discussion of employee misclassification across not only the transportation services field, but also in the construction industry, where, as discussed above, it has long been an important issue.

As more states review employee misclassification, it is imperative employers, employees, and contractors alike be aware of any changes to state and federal employment laws. While employers are frequent targets of employee misclassification enforcement efforts, “independent contractors” may also be held liable, especially when they willfully comply with intentional misclassification. An employer should never assume that paying a worker by the hour, or any one of the other factors set forth above, guarantees the worker should be classified as one classification or another. If you are concerned about your business’s employment practices, consult an employment law attorney in your area who can best advise you on your state’s employment laws.

Class 4 Hail-rated Tiles Expand to Texas

Boral Roofing's Barcelona Impact concrete roof tile

Boral Roofing’s Barcelona Impact concrete roof tile

Boral Roofing LLC, a provider of clay and concrete roof tile, is expanding its line of Class 4 hail rated tiles with the introduction of the high-profile Barcelona Impact concrete roof tile in the Texas market.

Barcelona Impact is a hail-resistant concrete tile that passed severe impact resistance testing in accordance with the FM 4473 standard. The tile is proven to withstand sequential 2-inch ice ball impacts at speeds up to 70 mph, fired from within five feet. Barcelona Impact roof tile is certified through the Roof Covering Impact Certification Program sponsored by Architectural Testing.

The addition of high barrel Barcelona Impact provides a complete Class 4 hail rated roof tile offering to the Texas market to complement our flat profile Country Slate Impact Class 4 product. Boral Roofing has been serving the great state of Texas with American-made tile products since 1974, and the expansion of the Class 4 hail rated tile offering further shows this long-standing commitment to the market.

With this performance certification and recognition, Texas homeowners can have even greater peace of mind in their homes and may obtain potential insurance cost savings by selecting a participating insurance company and requesting that their roofing contractor verify that Boral Roofing¹s Class 4 concrete tile was installed. All Boral Roofing tile is covered by a Limited Lifetime, Fully Transferable, Non-Prorated Concrete Product Warranty.

A specialized color portfolio of the new high barrel Barcelona Impact Class 4 tile is based on extensive market feedback from Texas customers. The new colors include a range of beautiful earth tone blends with Buckskin, Charcoal Brown Blend, Lexington Blend and Salerno Clay Blend.