Contractor Shows Versatility During Spectrum Field Restoration

Spectrum Field in Clearwater, Florida, is home to the Philadelphia Phillies in spring training and its minor league affiliate, the Clearwater Threshers. TarHeel Roofing replaced the main roof and restored and waterproofed the walls. Photo: TarHeel Corporation

TarHeel Corporation was founded as TarHeel Roofing in 1981. Headquartered in St. Petersburg, Florida, the company specializes in commercial work including roofing, waterproofing, cladding, damp proofing, exterior renovations, lightning protection and sheet metal. According to John Looney, president and owner of TarHeel Corporation, the company’s name was changed to better reflect its ability to work on the entire building envelope, including above- and below-grade waterproofing. 

When nearby Spectrum Field needed roofing and waterproofing work, Looney saw the project as a perfect opportunity to show off the company’s versatility. The stadium is home to the Philadelphia Phillies during spring training, and it also serves as the home field for the team’s minor league affiliate, the Clearwater Threshers. “We’ve done a lot of sports complexes in the past,” notes Looney. 

TarHeel Roofing restored the roof two years ago, and this year the company waterproofed the walls. The scopes of work included cold-applied roofing, waterproofing, caulking, and glazing, as well as repairing the tie-ins to pedestrian deck areas. “There were a lot of little pieces here that were right in our wheelhouse,” Looney says. 

Roofs and Walls

When the stadium’s existing modified bitumen roof reached the end of its service life, the decision was made to restore it with Garland’s Energizer K Plus FR. “We used Garland’s Energizer system, a cold-applied system with polyester mesh and granule surfacing on it,” Looney notes. 

The roof was restored with Garland’s Energizer K Plus FR system, a cold-applied roofing restoration system with granular surfacing. Photo: The Garland Company Inc.

Some perimeter areas of the roof were removed and repaired after an infrared scan was used to detect any moisture, and then the entire roof surface was cleaned and primed. The fluid-applied system is installed in two coats with a polyester or fiberglass scrim sheet fully adhered into it. Immediately after the second coat, granules are broadcast over the entire surface. “The finished product is very good-looking,” says Looney. 

Work on the vertical surfaces began in September 2018. The complex features walls clad in an exterior insulation and finish system (EIFS), as well as concrete and concrete masonry unit (CMU) walls. “The EIFS, concrete, and CMU walls each required a different application, but the basic scope of work is the same for each, with some variations,” Looney says. 

The walls were first cleaned and repaired. After the walls were pressure washed, crews repaired and replaced caulking at windows, doors and other penetrations. Cracks were filled using Garland’s Green-Lock Sealant XL, a polyether joint sealant with no VOCs. “We took care of cracks in the concrete and any breaks, including damage from baseballs hitting it,” Looney says. “Once the surface was repaired, we moved on the coating application.”

Crews applied Garland’s Tuff-Coat acrylic architectural wall coating. The coating can be applied with either a sprayer or rollers. Both methods were used on the project, but the majority of the work was done with rollers. The tan color was a crucial concern for the owners, and up-front testing ensured the tint would match up perfectly on the various substrates. “There was also some striping involved for aesthetics,” notes Looney. “We put on a band of a darker accent color.”

Crews from TarHeel Roofing cleaned and repaired the walls and waterproofed them with Garland’s Tuff-Coat acrylic architectural wall coating. Photo: TarHeel Corporation

The schedule was sometimes adjusted to accommodate concerts and other events. “The most unusual thing is the actual use of the building, obviously, being a baseball park with a lot of public access,” he says. “It takes a beating from all of the use and people there.”

Accessing some of the wall areas on the site was the biggest challenge on the project, according to Looney. “If you can picture the typical ballfield, you’ve got anything from ground-level vertical walls up to walls tucked behind seating up in the grandstand,” he explains. “Logistically, the challenge was getting access to all of the areas, extending from public concourses all the way up to the owner’s boxes and suites. A lot of that work was done from ground level, actually out on the field, reaching up with big Hi-Los that extended over two or three sections of seating.”

When figuring out the best approach, safety is always the primary concern. “Safety is a big part of any project, beginning with preparation and layout,” Looney says. “Once we were awarded the job, we weighed working from ladders, swing stages, and man lifts. In this project, we opted to do most of it from man lifts because of the safety concerns inherent in working from ladders, swing stages, or even scaffolding in some of these areas.” 

Major-league workmanship is the key to earning repeat business, says Looney. “We don’t do much advertising,” he says. “To us, that means every job has to be done well enough to be asked back. We pay a lot of attention to the details, including safety and the setup. To us, the finished product has to be great — that’s a given — but also the journey, from the start to the completion, is important as well. We do a lot of work on hospitals, health care areas, and industrial sites where us being in the way really isn’t an option. We are very familiar with working around the needs of businesses. So from a logistics and detail point of view, we are very sensitive to making sure the ride is as good as it can be.”

TEAM

Roofing and Waterproofing Contractor: TarHeel Corporation, St. Petersburg, Florida, www.tarheelcorp.com

MATERIALS 

Roof Restoration System: Energizer K Plus FR, The Garland Company Inc., www.garlandco.com

Wall Coating: Tuff-Coat, The Garland Company Inc.

Joint Sealant: Green-Lock Sealant XL, The Garland Company Inc.

Preserving History at Indiana State University

The State of Indiana approved a $16 million renovation project

The State of Indiana approved a $16 million renovation project that restored Normal Hall to its former glory. This photo shows the exterior after the renovation was completed. Photo: Indiana State University

Completed in 1909, Normal Hall is the second oldest surviving building on the Indiana State University campus in Terre Haute, Ind. Since then, Normal Hall has undergone multiple renovations, including an addition added in 1957. But by 2010, the grand neo-classical building was largely unoccupied and falling into disrepair. The hall maintained its perch at the center of campus, but years of service to its tens of thousands of students had taken their toll.

“We try to preserve the history of ISU here on campus,” says Seth Porter of ISU facility management. “But between roof leaks and other issues, it was becoming an eyesore.” So, the State of Indiana approved a $16 million renovation project and partnered with architectural firm arcDESIGN to bring the building back to life.

“This renovation will return Normal Hall to its rightful place in the center of campus life,” says ISU President Dan Bradley. “The project will provide a valuable new resource to students while preserving and re-energizing a significant historic structure in the heart of campus.”

Aside from the stately Indiana limestone, the building had to be redone from the foundation to the roof. And the history that makes Normal Hall special also made for unique challenges in the design and renovation process.

They Don’t Build Them Like They Used To

“People will say, ‘They don’t build them like they used to,’” says Greg Miller, project manager from arcDESIGN. And in many cases, “It’s a good thing they don’t!”

Normal Hall has undergone multiple renovations

Normal Hall has undergone multiple renovations since it was completed in 1909, but by 2010, the neo-classical building was largely unoccupied and in need of major structural repairs. Photo: Indiana State University Archive

Normal Hall was originally designed for and used as the university’s central library. At that time in history, after the Civil War and before the 1920s, libraries were built in a certain way. Due to open flames of gas lighting and unreliable supply of electricity, indoor lighting at the time could have been dangerous to a library’s collection. So, libraries were designed to maximize natural light, with plenty of windows, skylights, and even glass floors. Instead of structural walls, Normal Hall’s six levels of bookshelves—or “stacks”—were designed to be structurally self-supporting, independent of the rest of the building.

Miller led the design team through the challenging process of removing the six-level stacks and replacing them with four new floors for offices and building systems. A portion of the stacks system was salvaged and reconstructed, providing the same view patrons would have had more than 100 years ago.

The Biggest Challenge

During construction, crews discovered unstable structural conditions on the north side of the building adjacent to the original six-story stacks system. The entire exterior wall had to be removed and replaced, all while supporting the existing attic and roof nearly 60-feet above the ground floor.

To do this, crews constructed a mammoth 60-foot-high temporary structural system in and through the six-story iron stacks system still in place to support the original attic and roof deck. The north wall was completely removed and reconstructed. Structural steel columns supporting roof trusses were replaced while ends of deteriorated roof trusses were reconstructed in place.

“It was a monumental feat,” Miller says. “It was a great example of teamwork by Indiana State University, design consultants and the contractor.”

The Roof System

For the roof replacement portion of the project, arcDESIGN collaborated with The Garland Company Inc., a leader of high-performance roof and building envelope solutions. Garland worked with local roofing contractor Associated Roofing Professionals (ARP) to install a new modified bitumen roof system with a high albedo coating.

All existing roofing was removed to structure and Garland’s StressPly EUV fiberglass-polyester reinforced, SBS and SIS modified bitumen membrane was installed to provide long-term waterproofing protection.

Associated Roofing Professionals installed a new modified bitumen roof system

Associated Roofing Professionals installed a new modified bitumen roof system manufactured by The Garland Company. After the modified bitumen membrane was installed, the roof was then coated with Garland’s Pyramic white, nontoxic, reflective acrylic coating. Photo: The Garland Company Inc.

The roof was then coated with Garland’s Pyramic white, nontoxic, acrylic coating, which helps preserve asphaltic or modified bitumen surfaces and significantly reduces under-roof temperatures to create a more energy-efficient environment.

“ISU has a strong commitment to the environment, and we were able to help them achieve their performance goals while also contributing to LEED credits with our environmentally-conscious products,” explains Rick Ryherd, area manager for Garland.

The largest—and brightest—rehabilitation involved the stained-glass dome atop Normal Hall. The original dome had deteriorated so extensively that, by the middle of the 20th century, the remaining glass panels were completely removed and the dome was completely hidden. A suspended plaster ceiling sealed off the once grand rotunda. “Imagine just a skeleton, an empty dome with only the ribs visible,” said Miller.

The dome restoration began with historic photos, documents and forensic analysis. The glass art featured distinguished educators and philosophers. Some of the original stained-glass panels were recovered from the building, whiles others had to be recreated. Conrad Schmitt Studios, in Wisconsin, restored the stained glass to its former glory. With the stained glass restored, rehab on the rotunda continued. Inside Normal Hall, the rotunda mural was restored and more than 140 light bulb sockets were re-wired to light the dome. Above the dome, a new 40-foot octagonal skylight was installed, along with supplemental lighting. Below the rotunda, 20 original columns that stretch through the open hall were restored with scagliola and paint finishes.

The crew worked to save original hardware and finishes that hadn’t already been lost to time. They were able to restore and replicate plaster moldings and cornices, save original wood doors and casings, and restore the grand marble and bronze staircase. “The general contractor did a great job preserving the historic detail with the extra time they put into restoring this building,” notes Porter.

The Future of Normal Hall

With all the time and effort put into preserving the history, the team did not forget to focus on the future of Normal Hall. The team, starting with arcDESIGN, incorporated the old and the new seamlessly.

The north exterior wall had to be removed

The north exterior wall had to be removed and replaced, so crews constructed a 60-foot-high temporary structure to support the existing attic and roof. Photo: Greg Miller, arcDESIGN.

For starters, Miller said the design was intended to respect but not imitate the building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Rather, he said, “the design clearly communicates original versus new construction to patrons.” Miller consulted experts from the team, from historians to a representative from the roofing manufacturer to gather the full scope of the project.

Today, the original stately limestone structure is accentuated by the addition, comprised predominantly of glass and Indiana limestone. The addition houses functional requirements such as stairs, elevators, restrooms and mechanical services, maximizing use of the historic interior spaces.

The renovation was planned and constructed to achieve LEED Certification by the USGBC. Renovation included new HVAC systems utilizing the university’s existing central steam heating plant that runs on natural gas. LED lighting throughout is an energy efficient replacement for the building, originally built with combination gas and electric light fixtures.

100 Years in the Making

Re-dedicated in October 2015, Normal Hall is back in action at the center of campus as home to the university’s Center for Student Success and numerous tutors, counselors and mentors. Below the rotunda, more than 100 years after the building opened its doors, students gather in the university Reading Room and Gallery modeled after the original hall when it opened to students in 1909.

TEAM

Architect: arcDESIGN, Indianapolis, Arcdesign.us
General Contractor: Weddle Brothers Construction, Evansville, Ind., Weddlebros.com
Roofing Contractor: Associated Roofing Professionals, Terre Haute, Ind.
Roof System Manufacturer: The Garland Company Inc., Garlandco.com

The Garland Company Donates to Cancer Research

Last year, three members of Garland’s work family were diagnosed with cancer. But they were ready to fight and so was The Garland Company. Employees vowed to make a difference in the name of their colleagues and launched a nationwide fundraiser for Ohio Cancer Research (OCR). 

At OCR’s Star Award Gala, Garland presented a donation of $80,573 to benefit the cancer research and awareness efforts of OCR.

“This donation represents so much more than a monetary gift. This is a testament to the way we support one another, especially in times where community is most important. I’m so amazed by how strong and united our team is,” said Dave Sokol, president of The Garland Company.

Employees at The Garland Company held a variety of fundraisers to benefit the cause. Garland dedicated their annual summer Spirit Week fundraiser to OCR, raising funds from employees across the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. Inspired by the generosity of the employees, Garland’s Board of Directors announced that the company would match the amount raised, pushing the total donation to OCR over $80,000.

OCR serves a role in the fight against cancer as they provide the “seed” money needed by researchers pursuing ideas in cancer research who can then compete and secure larger funding on the national level. Nearly 70 percent of the 160 new ideas funded by OCR have resulted in success and continued funding from other sources.