Project Profiles: Education Facilities

Maury Hall, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Wagner Roofing, Hyattsville, Md.
General Contractor: C.E.R. Inc., Baltimore, (410) 247-9096

The project included 34 dormers that feature double-lock standing-seam copper and fascia metal.

The project included 34 dormers that feature double-lock standing-seam copper and fascia metal.

ROOF MATERIALS

Wagner Roofing was awarded the complete replacement of all roof systems. These included an upper double-lock standing-seam copper roof system, a bullnose copper cornice transition, slate mansard, 34 dormers with double-lock standing-seam copper and fascia metal, eight copper hip metal caps and a continuous built-in gutter with decorative copper fascia. Each of the dormers also had a copper window well.

The upper standing-seam roof was removed and replaced with 24-inch-wide, 20-ounce copper coil rollformed into 1-inch-high by 21-inch-wide continuous standing-seam panels that matched the original profile. The eave bullnose, which also served as the mansard flashing, was removed and returned to Wagner Roofing’s shop where it was replicated to match the exact size and profile.

The 34 dormer roofs were replaced with 20-inch-wide, 20-ounce copper coil formed into 1-inch-high by 17-inch- wide continuous standing-seam panels. The decorative ornate fascia of the dormers was carefully removed and Wagner’s skilled craftsmen used it as a template to develop the new two-piece copper cornice to which the roof panels locked. The cheeks and face of the dormers were also re-clad with custom-fabricated 20-ounce copper.

The oversized built-in-gutter at the base of the slate mansard was removed and replaced with a new 20-ounce copper liner custom-formed and soldered onsite. The replacement included a specialty “bull-nosed” drip edge at the base of the slate and an ornate, custom-formed fascia on the exterior of the built-in gutter. The decorative copper fascia included 85 “hubcaps”, 152 “half wheels” and 14 decorative pressed-copper miters. The original hubcap and half-wheel ornaments were broken down and patterns were replicated. Each ornamental piece was hand assembled from a pattern of 14 individual pieces of 20-ounce copper before being installed at their precise original location on the new fascia. The miters were made by six different molds, taken from the original worn pieces, to stamp the design into 20-ounce sheet copper.

In all, more than 43,000 pounds of 20-ounce copper was used on the project.

Copper Manufacturer: Revere Copper Products

ROOF REPORT

Maury Hall was built in 1907 and was designed by Ernest Flagg. Flagg designed many of the buildings at the U.S. Naval Academy, including the Chapel, Bancroft Hall, Mahan Hall, the superintendent’s residence and Sampson Hall. His career was largely influenced by his studies at École des Beaux-Arts, Paris. Examples of Flagg’s Beaux-Arts influence can be found in the decorative copper adorning the built-in gutter on building designs.

Maury Hall currently houses the departments of Weapons and Systems Engineering and Electrical Engineering. The building sits in a courtyard connected to Mahan Hall and across from its design twin, Sampson Hall.

PHOTO: Joe Guido

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Boral Roofing Introduces Florida Concrete Roof Tile Collections Brochure

Boral Roofing Introduces Florida Concrete Roof Tile Collections Brochure for the Florida region.

Boral Roofing Introduces Florida Concrete Roof Tile Collections Brochure for the Florida region.

Boral Roofing introduces its Florida Concrete Roof Tile Collections brochure. The brochure provides an overview of products designed for the Florida region, including color graphics of its premium and standard profiles and colors.

Boral Roofing has been serving the Florida market for over 30 years. By focusing on innovations in manufacturing, Boral offers durability. The two Boral facilities in Florida provide pre-blended tile colors creating traditional, transitional, and contemporary looks for architectural styles.

Aesthetic value is not the only thing Boral offers. The company also offers an energy efficient roof system. The Boral Cool Roof System uses five components to reduce attic temperatures providing up to a 22% reduction in heating and cooling costs.

Swing Tape and Layout Methods Make Tile Layout Easy

When I see a home with a tile roof, my first thought is, “Nice roof”. A roof goes from “nice” to “Wow, that roof is spectacular!” when the installer pays attention to the details. Some details that make a difference are appropriate flashings, or chimney, skylight and wall metal work that is consistent and does not detract from the aesthetic look of the roof. However, nothing conveys the knowledge and skill of a craftsman more than crisp, clean, straight lines of tile, row after row.

Nothing conveys the knowledge and skill of a craftsman more than crisp, clean, straight lines of tile, row after row.  PHOTO: ROOFWERKS INC., RALEIGH, N.C.

Nothing conveys the knowledge and skill of a craftsman more than crisp, clean, straight lines of tile, row after row. PHOTO: ROOFWERKS INC., RALEIGH, N.C.

Consistent row spacing (exposure) is aesthetically more appealing. It requires dividing the space between the top and bottom of the roof by the number of rows while avoiding a short course at the ridge. Using long division and 1/8- inch increments from a tape measure is one way to achieve this goal. However, that’s a method that challenges my calculator, let alone eager installers who just want to start pounding nails. They may believe it’s easier to deal with the ridge when they get there! It’s no wonder new installers can be intimidated by the layout stage of a tile roof installation. Even experienced installers may miss opportunities to minimize cuts, increase efficiency and achieve that “perfect look” we all admire.

WHAT IS LAYOUT?

Unless precluded by a specific manufacturer’s design, proper clay and concrete tile installation requires a 3-inch minimum overlap. That means a typical 17-inch-long concrete tile has a “maximum exposure” of 14 inches. If the goal is to space the rows evenly, we must first determine the location of the eave course and ridge course. For example, if we find the space between the eave and ridge courses is 140 inches, we can have 10 rows set at the maximum exposure of 14 inches. Perfect!

But what if the distance is only 135 inches? Setting nine rows at 14 inches will require us to cut 5 inches off of our top row. Cutting the tile would remove the fastener holes and tile lugs and make the top course uniquely short, taking away from a precision aesthetic. Most tiles have an “adjustable headlap”, meaning the overlap can be increased. If we set each of the 10 rows at 13 1/2 inches, we would absorb the extra 5 inches evenly over the entire slope with an extra 1/2-inch overlap per row. Row spacing would be consistent; fastener holes and lugs intact; and we would not have to cut tile, drill new holes and throw away the scraps.

The math is not always as easy as an extra 5 inches divided by 10 rows. Eighths and sixteenths don’t work well in long division. The TRI/WSRCA Concrete and Clay Roof Tile Installation Manual, from the Edmonds, Wash.-based Tile Roofing Institute and Morgan Hill, Calif.-based Western States Roofing Contractors Association has a Quick Reference Chart on page 27. It shows proper row spacing for sample eave- to ridge-row measurements. You may find situations where the chart is helpful.

HORIZONTAL LAYOUT USING THE SWING TAPE METHOD

ILLUSTRATION: TRI/WSRCA CONCRETE AND CLAY ROOF TILE INSTALLATION MANUAL

ILLUSTRATION: TRI/WSRCA CONCRETE AND CLAY ROOF TILE INSTALLATION MANUAL


Craftsmen develop “tricks of the trade” that make complicated tasks simple, their work easier or the finished product better. The “Swing Tape Method” does all three.

To avoid the math and use the Swing Tape Method, installers mark their measuring tape at the maximum exposure of tile they are using. Continuing with the example of a 17-inch tile and a 14-inch maximum exposure, the tape will be marked at 14, 28, 42, 56 inches, etc. Using the 135-inch eave- to ridge-course distance in the previous scenario, the installer would place the tip of the tape at the eave-row chalk line and run upslope to find the top-row chalk line at 135 inches. Seeing his tape is marked at 140 inches, the installer would swing his tape in an arc to the left or right until the 140-inch mark aligns with the top-row chalk line. Although the tape is marked in 14-inch increments, the now diagonal lay of the tape has shortened the distance of each horizontal row to 13 1/2 inches. The Swing Tape Method arrived at the same conclusion as the previous arithmetic. The installer marks the underlayment with chalk or a crayon next to each 14-inch increment on the tape measure. He repeats the same process at the other end of the slope and then chalks horizontal lines along the new markings on the underlayment.

Using a tape measure with this method requires marking each row onto the underlayment. This only should be done with chalk or a crayon. Scarring the underlayment with a nail or screwdriver can lead to premature failure of the underlayment.

A modern advancement to the Swing Tape Method uses Layout Tape instead of a marked tape measure. Layout Tape is a paper roll marked with red arrows highlighting the maximum exposure for the tile being used. In this example, the arrows would be at 14-inch intervals. Using the same process as with a marked tape measure, the installer can secure the Layout Tape, placing a red arrow on the top of the eave-row chalk line, then unroll the tape upslope to the top-row chalk line. Using the same 135-inch eave- to ridge-course example, the installer will find a red arrow 5 inches above the top-row chalk line. He will swing the tape to the left or right until the red arrow lines up with the top-row chalk line. The red arrows become the targets for the horizontal chalk lines. Because the Layout Tape is left in place, the installer avoids the step of marking each and every row on the underlayment.

PICTURE PERFECT

Of course not all roof slopes are simple rectangles. Some roof designs are quite complicated and as installers we have to play the hand we are dealt. The Swing Tape Method can help you make the best of challenging situations by allowing you to virtually try out different layout options. If a slope has multiple ridgelines, you can set the tape to the most beneficial location. This may reduce your cutwork or put a short course in the least visible location. On larger sections, you may choose to adjust the row spacing to better accommodate ridgelines, headwalls or dormers. Be aware that midslope adjustment of exposure can result in a change to the diagonal line of the tile sidelaps but does not affect function.

Using the Swing Tape Method with Layout Tape or a marked tape measure appropriate for the tile being used will ensure proper exposure. It will also reduce cutting and increase your efficiency while laying the foundation for a picture- perfect installation.

SWING TAPE METHOD STEPS

1 Determine eave-course placement (consider eave closure, gutter, desired overhang) and snap a line to place head of the tile or top of the battens if battens are to be used.
2 Determine top-row placement (consider ridge riser board, ventilation, etc.) and snap a line to place head of the tile or top of the battens if battens are to be used.
3 Using Layout Tape or a marked tape measure, place an arrow or mark at the eave-course line. Measure straight to the ridgeline. Swing the tape to the left or right until an arrow or mark aligns with the top-row chalk line.
4 If you are using Layout Tape, fasten the tape. If you are using a marked tape measure, you must mark the underlayment at each mark on the tape measure.
5 Repeat this process at the other end of the roof. Snap lines between the arrows or marks on the underlayment.

KISS: Keep It Simple, Silly

Editor Christina Koch married Bart Thoreson on Aug. 29 along the lake behind their Iowa home.

Editor Christina Koch married Bart Thoreson on Aug. 29 along the lake behind their Iowa home.

My new husband Bart is the one who shared the “work smart, not hard” mantra I related in my November/December 2014 “Raise the Roof” column, page 8. He’s constantly recommending ways to complete tasks that I have to admit are simpler than my own attempts. It’s not always easy for me to accept his suggestions because I’ve being doing things just fine on my own for a long time.

I can’t help but see the parallels to the construction industry—an industry that many say is slow to change. However, I think we can all agree that if a new way of doing things helps us work smarter, it’s worth a try. In “Business Sense”, Todd A. Jones and Katie Dunn discuss project delivery methods. Jones, an attorney with experience in construction law and litigation, points out that fewer contracts and more coordination with design-build lead to more efficient projects. Jones also thinks that as the construction industry continues to embrace design-build,we’ll see less litigation—a win-win for everyone.

Surely, as you’ve become more experienced in your position, you’ve developed “tricks of the trade” that help you complete tasks more efficiently. In “Tech Point”, John Jensen, president of Jensen Roofing Inc., Newcastle, Wash., and the training program manager for the Edmonds, Wash.-based Tile Roofing Institute, shares a couple “tricks” that will ease tile roofing layout. What are your “tricks of the trade”? Please share them with me!

Her Roofing family was in attendance (shown here at the rehearsal dinner). From left to right: John Riester, vice president of business development; Barrett Hahn, publisher, who served as the wedding photographer; and Becky Riester, who was a bridesmaid.

Koch’s Roofing family was in attendance (shown here at the rehearsal dinner). From left to right: John Riester, vice president of business development; Barrett Hahn, publisher, who served as the wedding photographer; and Becky Riester, who was a bridesmaid.

As winter approaches, it’s a good time to remind your customers how they can avoid emergency calls to your roofing company. In “On My Mind”, Connie Menard with Greenawalt Roofing Co., Landisville, Pa., shares seven tips your customers can complete to ensure their buildings are well protected this winter. Step No. 6 is “Clean your gutters”, something my husband does for our home and that of our elderly neighbor on a regular basis. Our neighbor says I’m lucky to have such a considerate husband. Bart says he’s just trying to avoid potential problems from arising. I’m pretty sure they’re both right.

Sealant Is Elastomer-based

Lucas #5400 is a high-performance, thermoplastic elastomer-based roofing sealant.

Lucas #5400 is a high-performance, thermoplastic elastomer-based roofing sealant.

Lucas #5400 is a high-performance, thermoplastic elastomer-based roofing sealant. The multipurpose sealant adheres to most surfaces, including asphalt, shingles, modified bitumen, metal, Kynar, wood, concrete, tile, masonry and others. It is available in three grades: brush grade, trowel grade and caulk grade. Lucas #5400 is manufactured from UV-stable SEBS thermoplastic elastomers while the asphalt portion of the formula adheres to asphaltic materials and other surfaces. The product will not crack or harden over time and is easy to apply even in cold weather.

Tile Roofing System Is Made of Lightweight High-strength Steel

Roser Cleo Tile

Roser Cleo Tile

The Roser Cleo Tile will give your home a fresh and radiant appearance while leaving you in the comfort of protection that only a stone-coated steel roof can offer. The beautiful appeal of classic tile with the performance of lightweight high-strength steel, resistant to fire and hurricane-force winds, is an ideal choice for any homeowner.

The roofing system includes:

  • Clear acrylic over-glaze protective coating
  • Roofing granule coating
  • Adhesive basecoat
  • Protective surface coating
  • Aluminum/zinc coating
  • Commercial-grade steel core
  • Aluminum/zinc coating
  • Protective surface coating

The Stone Coated Steel Roofing System, manufactured by Roser, offers the advantage of high-strength steel with a look a variety of traditional and innovative architectural styles. When compared to asphalt shingles and concrete roofing products, which can weigh 350 to 1,000 pounds per square, the Roser Stone Coated Roofing System, at only 150 pounds per square, effectively reduces the overhead weight on the house structure. This provides for a much safer building during an earthquake, fire or a hurricane. While the standard shingle and shake roofs naturally deteriorate over time, the Roser Roofing System will continue to maintain its beautiful appearance and requires the least amount of maintenance in the roofing industry. An eco-friendly Roser roof will increase the resale value of your home not only with its elegance, but also with its proven durability.

About the Roser Roofing System:

  • Installs direct to deck or over battens.
  • Stone surface resists fading and provides for a quiet roof.
  • Fastener design features a confirmed and a locking profile.
  • Low-maintenance roof system with water-shedding performance.
  • Storm driven engineering design is proven throughout the world.
  • Includes the stringent Miami-Dade Approval.

Stone-coated Metal Protects Buildings

Stone-coated metal roofing systems from Gerard.

Stone-coated metal roofing systems from Gerard.


Stone-coated metal roofing systems from Gerard, a Headwaters Roofing brand, are available in a broad array of colors—three of which are ENERGY STAR approved—and profiles, including shingle, shake and tile. Constructed of 26-gauge Galvalume steel panels, Gerard roofing systems include a Class A fire rating, a 2.5-inch hailstone warranty and a 120-mph wind warranty. Although Gerard stone-coated metal roofing systems can be installed direct to deck, the optimum energy-saving method is to install on top of a batten or counter-batten grid.

Metal Roofing Resembles Shake, Slate and More

Quality Edge has launched Matterhorn Metal Roofing, which is made from steel and available in four profiles: Shake, Slate, Tile and Standing Seam.

Quality Edge has launched Matterhorn Metal Roofing, which is made from steel and available in four profiles: Shake, Slate, Tile and Standing Seam.

Quality Edge has launched Matterhorn Metal Roofing, which is made from steel and available in four profiles: Shake, Slate, Tile and Standing Seam. A two-year development process resulted in carefully crafted splits, cracks and grains that mimic each profile’s natural counterpart. The shake profile features 21 individual shake designs to enhance the natural overall effect. In addition, Matterhorn’s patented fourpoint fastening system conceals the overlapping metal panels on slate and shake. All profiles have been tested to withstand hurricane-force winds up to 130 mph.

Stone-coated Metal Is Lightweight

Allmet Roofing by Headwaters is a premium stone-coated metal roofing system that delivers the rugged durability and strength of metal roofing with the handsome look of wood shake, genuine slate, Spanish tile and shingle roofing.

Allmet Roofing by Headwaters is a premium stone-coated metal roofing system that delivers the rugged durability and strength of metal roofing with the handsome look of wood shake, genuine slate, Spanish tile and shingle roofing.

Allmet Roofing by Headwaters is a premium stone-coated metal roofing system that delivers the rugged durability and strength of metal roofing with the handsome look of wood shake, genuine slate, Spanish tile and shingle roofing. Allmet stone-coated metal roofing is light in weight and among the safest roofs in seismic regions. When installed as designed, the dry under-deck roofing system eliminates need for moisture barriers. Made from 3/16 Galvalume-coated metal, Allmet systems won’t rot, crack, warp or break. They’re energy efficient and feature a Class A fire rating.

Roof Bracket Allows Staging of Materials without Covering Anchor Screws

Acro Building Systems' Johnny Jack roof bracket

Acro Building Systems’ Johnny Jack roof bracket

The Johnny Jack roof bracket’s patent-pending design provides a better platform for staging materials on steep-slope roofs. Made in the U.S.A. by Acro Building Systems, the roof bracket is designed to stage materials on architectural roofing, including metal shingles, slate, tile and asphalt, while never covering the anchor screws. It features a 5 1/2-inch surface clearance, and is ideal for working around dormers. Operational dimensions are 7 by 1 foot and the bracket folds to 48 inches for storage. The bracket, which weighs 14 pounds, is powder coated safety yellow and spans 6 1/2 feet.