IRE and R&D

The conventional wisdom is that when the overall economy is strong, manufacturers feel more comfortable investing their resources in research and development of new products. I don’t have hard numbers to back that assertion up, but in my experience, at least anecdotally, it seems to be borne out. During the Great Recession years of the last decade, the number of new products coming to market seemed to decline. If the array of new products I saw at this year’s International Roofing Expo (IRE) in New Orleans is any indication, we could be in for a banner year.

The IRE makes it easy to keep tabs on new developments with its New Product Pavilion. The depth and breadth of offerings in that area was impressive, but I saw products being unveiled all over the show floor. Time will tell if they will turn out be a flash in the pan, a category-changing development, or something in between — but for the Roofing team, it was a very interesting show to cover, as there were a lot of excited responses when we asked, “What’s new?”

Innovative products on display included a pre-weathered fastener from Lakeside Construction Fasteners that matches aged Corten panels, so installation and repairs don’t leave bright silver dots on the rust-colored surface.

Carlisle showcased its Rapid Lock Technology, which uses a Velcro attachment system to secure the company’s EPDM and TPO membranes without using a bonding adhesive, doing away with temperature restrictions.

OMG Roofing Products unveiled its RhinoBond Hand Welder, which can be used to install the company’s induction welding fastening system in hard-to-reach areas, such as spaces below signs, pipes and rooftop equipment.

Georgia-Pacific showed off enhancements to DensDeck Prime that make the cover boards more resistant to water and increase their vertical pull strength.

Roof Sentry announced the launch of a solar-powered roof vent that provides moisture detection and data monitoring services. It can also remove moisture from low-slope roof systems.

On the residential side, new developments included GAF’s shingles with StainGuard Plus, which uses copper granules with time-release technology to fight algae growth.

Tie Down Engineering offered the Ergo Stripper, an ergonomically designed tool for removing shingles that improves leverage and eases strain on the back.

The Roof Umbrella rooftop canopy system is designed to be installed in less than 30 minutes on jobsites to prevent weather delays. It can be customized with the contractor’s logo.

These are just a few of the items that caught our eye at the IRE. We will be showcasing them in this issue and future issues of the magazine as part of our editorial mission to keep readers up to date on new products hitting the market. If you saw a new product you’d like us to be aware of, just email me at chris@roofingmagazine.com.

Three Sioux City Community School District Projects Are Part of Long-Term Plan

In 2017, Winkler Roofing crews re-roofed portions of two high schools and one elementary school. Shown here is an aerial photo of East High School. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

For the Sioux City Community School District (SCCSD) in Sioux City, Iowa, the final dismissal bell of the school year marks more than the start of summer break for students and staff. It also signals the beginning of roofing season.

In addition to routine maintenance and repairs, each summer brings at least one major roofing project for the district and its 24 facilities. Existing roofs that have fallen out of warranty coverage are replaced. The district also has completed a steady stream of construction projects over the past 16 years, replacing aging schools to meet evolving needs.

District enrollment has increased by several hundred students over that timeframe and now stands at more than 14,500. SCCSD also has expanded its programming, creating specialty elementary schools focusing on STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), computer programming, environmental sciences, the arts, and dual-language education in English and Spanish. These specialties continue with middle school exploratory classes and eventually lead to the Sioux City Career Academy, which offers numerous education pathways to help students prepare for postsecondary education and careers.

Aerial view of West High School. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

“Our facilities need to keep up with the curriculum and new technologies so we can provide the best possible learning environments for our students,” says SCCSD Director of Operations and Maintenance Brian Fahrendholz, adding that the facilities plan emphasizes both supporting student achievement and maintaining fiscal responsibility.

Winkler Roofing Inc. of Sioux City has been one of the district’s key partners in this process for more than 20 years, installing new or partial roofing systems on nearly every building in the district. The summer of 2017 saw its crews re-roof portions of two high schools and one elementary school, installing 335 squares of new TPO roof systems and removing 170 tons of ballast.

A crew of between six and nine professionals was on a jobsite at any given time. The three projects were completed in less than a month, beginning in late June and wrapping up in late July. And there was nothing on the punch list following the warranty inspections.

A Systematic Approach

In recent years, SCCSD has adopted a systematic, long-range-planning approach to roof system management, working with local architects to evaluate its facilities, identify and plan work that needs to be completed the following summer, and map out future projects. The three roofs replaced in 2017 were indicative of this approach.

TPO Bonding Adhesive is applied on the substrate and the back of TPO membrane. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

Each of the roofs was between 15 and 20 years old and had begun to show signs of age. Their manufacturers’ warranties had also expired in recent years, making their replacement next up on the district’s roofing project schedule.

“We typically replace roofing systems within five years of the warranty expiration,” Fahrendholz explains. “It enables us to stay ahead of the maintenance issues that can begin cropping up.”

All three existing roofs had ballasted EPDM roofing systems. The re-roofing projects continued the district’s move toward TPO systems and, where possible, eliminating ballast. The three new roofing systems have 20-year, no-dollar-limit labor and material warranties.

SCCSD has several reasons for moving away from ballasted systems, according to Winkler Roofing President Jeff Winkler, P.E. In addition to reducing the roof’s weight and eliminating the cost of the ballast, unballasted roofs have a neater appearance and it is easier to monitor the membrane’s condition and find and repair any leaks. And, of course, when the time for re-roofing comes, there are no truckloads of ballast to remove and replace.

According to Winkler, SCCSD likes the durability of TPO membranes. “They like that the membrane is reinforced and that the seams are heat-welded, rather than seamed with primer and tape,” Winkler notes.

East High School Project

Re-roofing a 5,356-square-foot section at East High School entailed a complete tear-off of the existing ballasted EPDM roofing system and insulation down to the steel roof deck. The Winkler Roofing team then installed a new system topped with Mule-Hide TPO with CLEAN Film from Mule-Hide Products Co. It was the first time Winkler Roofing had installed the prodcut.

At East High School, polyisocyanurate insulation is installed using 3-inch galvalume plates and drill point fasteners. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

Three layers of polyisocyanurate insulation were mechanically fastened with screws and plates to enhance the building’s energy efficiency. The 60-mil TPO membrane was then fully adhered using TPO Bonding Adhesive from Mule-Hide Products.

The last step in any well-done TPO project is removing the dirt and scuffs that are inevitably left behind during installation, notes Winkler. That step is eliminated with this product; the crew simply removes the protective film covering the membrane to reveal a clean roof that is ready for inspection.

“The material is more expensive than regular TPO membranes, but there is the potential to make up for that in reduced labor costs,” Winkler notes.

The biggest benefit would be seen on roofs that have fewer penetrations, according to Winkler. Installing the membrane around penetrations requires removing a portion of the protective film, he explains. Because those areas are then exposed to scuffs and dirt, crews must go back and clean them by hand.

West High School Project

Meticulous detail work was key to the successful replacement of a 18,056-square-foot section of the roof at West High School. There were nearly four dozen penetrations in the roof, from 4-inch pipes to HVAC equipment measuring 8 feet by 12 feet. Many of the chimney stacks also were in spots that were awkward for the crew to work around.

Winkler Roofing crew members prepare to install a TPO walkway pad. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

It was all in a day’s work for the Winkler Roofing team. “The quality of our detail work is one of the things we take pride in,” Winkler says. “The keys are good leadership, both on and off the roof, and a well-seasoned crew. My foreman, Absalon Quezada, is a master of solving the toughest of details and coordinating a well-orchestrated crew.”

The roof’s existing concrete deck made a mechanically attached system uneconomical, so a new ballasted system was specified. The existing ballast had deteriorated to the point that, if reused, it could puncture the new roofing membrane. So, all 100 tons of it, along with the existing EPDM membrane, were removed and disposed of. The pieces of stainless steel cap metal along the perimeter were removed and numbered in sequence for reinstallation later. Sections of water-damaged insulation were removed and replaced.

An additional layer of polyisocyanurate insulation was loose-layered over the entire roof to improve energy efficiency, followed by a new loose-layered 60-mil white TPO membrane. New ballast was then installed.

Details such as this pipe boot were installed using a hot-air welder. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

The crew navigated a challenging site while depositing the new ballast on the roof of the one-story building. The site offered only one feasible parking spot for the seven dump trucks that would deliver the rock, and that was on a lawn, just on the other side of two large trees. Crews carefully noted the location of sprinklers for the in-ground irrigation system to avoid driving over them, and shut the system down for several days in advance of the delivery to minimize ruts caused by the trucks’ tires. The trees’ trunks were spaced less than 20 feet apart and the canopies have grown together, leaving only small tunnel to feed the conveyor through. Crews kept the conveyor low as they extended it through the branches, then brought it to roof height by repeatedly raising it and the backing the truck up.

Riverside Elementary School Project

At Riverside Elementary School, a 7,314-square-foot section of roof was replaced with a 60-mil, fully attached TPO system.

The existing EPDM membrane, ballast and edge metal flashings were removed and disposed of. Crews removed and replaced any water-damaged insulation, added an additional layer of polyisocyanurate insulation throughout to increase the building’s energy efficiency, and mechanically attached the insulation to the steel roof deck using screws and plates. The white TPO membrane was then installed using bonding adhesive, and new edge metal flashings were added.

Straight A’s on the Report Card

The new roofs received top grades on their inspection report cards.

At East High School, crews installed Mule-Hide TPO with CLEAN Film from Mule-Hide Products Co. The last step in the installation process is removing the protective film covering the membrane. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

When Mule-Hide Products Co. Territory Manager Jake Rowell inspected the roofs, there were no items on his, or the district’s, punch list. The only remaining task — which was completed during the inspection — was covering the seams on the West High School roof with ballast; they had intentionally been left exposed for easy inspection. In fact, that was the only “to-do list” item Rowell noted during inspections of 11 Winkler Roofing projects that week.

“The quality of their work is phenomenal,” Rowell says. “The crews take pride in their work. They don’t just throw a project together and move on. They check their work to make sure it’s done right before I see it and before the customer sees it.”

THE TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Winkler Roofing Inc., Sioux City, Iowa
Architect: FEH DESIGN, Sioux City, Iowa, www.fehdesign.com
Roofing Materials Distributor: ABC Supply Co. Inc., www.abcsupply.com
Decorative Sheet Metal: Interstate Mechanical Corp., Sioux City, Iowa, www.interstatemechanicalcorp.com

MATERIALS

TPO Membrane Roof Systems: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc., www.mulehide.com

Retrofit Roofing Project Highlights Advancements in Building Materials and Methods

The roof was replaced on Huntsman Corporation’s Advanced Technology Center, an L-shaped, 70,000-square-foot facility housing expensive equipment and research labs. A TPO membrane roof system was installed over high-density polyiso cover board.

The roof was replaced on Huntsman Corporation’s Advanced Technology Center, an L-shaped, 70,000-square-foot facility housing expensive equipment and research labs.

Over the last few decades, computer and scientific innovations have evolved at a furious pace, with new technologies rapidly replacing only slightly older ones. In this race for the latest and greatest, it sometimes feels like the devices in our pockets and controlling our home stereos are from some virtual reality, while the building materials of our homes and workplaces are relics of a bygone age. But, looks can be deceiving, and the polyiso insulation industry is playing a role in evolving our built environment.

For example, many commercial buildings seem only superficially different from those built a generation ago when seen from a distance. But, from behind the glass curtain walls and updated building amenities, we may not notice the disruptive technologies that have substantially improved building systems in recent years. Informed by sophisticated research and utilizing advanced components, cutting-edge building materials are thinner, stronger and more resilient than traditional products. Adopting them in both new construction and renovation can appreciably improve building performance, while also decreasing environmental impact. These products are particularly attractive to forward-looking companies interested in buildings that will prove cost-effective over the long term.

A Case in Point

When the Huntsman Corporation began considering facility improvements for its Huntsman Advanced Technology Center (HATC) in The Woodlands, Texas, they decided to embrace the most innovative materials available. This four-building campus, located about 35 miles north of Houston, serves as the company’s leading research and development facility in the Americas, so it is appropriate that it be built with products as advanced as the technology it houses. Replacing the aging PVC roof on Building 1 was a key element in this upgrade.

After more than two decades of exposure to the Texas heat, the roof was approaching the end of its useful life. With expensive equipment and valuable research in labs throughout the building, Huntsman didn’t want to take any chances in modernizing the L-shaped, 70,000-square foot facility. With the added incentive of receiving the highest-level certification from its insurer, the company decided to remove and completely replace the existing roof with state-of-the-art materials.

Commercial roofs in Texas are required to have an insulation R-value of 20 or higher, so simply replacing the existing membrane and lightweight insulating concrete on a metal deck that the building had used before with the same materials would not have sufficed. In addition, current codes which say that old roofs need to be brought up to current code when doing a tear-off job. After reviewing the options, they chose to install thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) membrane roofing over high-density polyiso cover board.

The polyiso cover boards are lightweight and easy to cut, which reduces both time and labor costs for installation. They add strength and protection to a roofing system, enhancing the system’s long-term performance. They can be shipped with approximately three times more square feet per truckload than gypsum products, so fewer trucks are needed, leading to fuel and transportation savings. Plus, they can be cut without specialized tools and workers don’t have to worry about the dust that is created when sawing, as they would with other types of cover boards. And most importantly, these high-density boards are based on proven technology.

A TPO membrane roof system was installed over high-density polyiso cover board.

A TPO membrane roof system was installed over high-density polyiso cover board.


Drawn to polyiso for its high R-value per inch of thickness, compressive strength, impressive fire-, wind- and moisture-resistance, long-term durability, and low environmental impact, Huntsman partnered with roof mechanics experienced in working with these materials and committed to both safety and quality.

If the original installers of the previous roof 22-years earlier had witnessed this new project, they would have been amazed. Instead of hoisting heavy materials up ladders, pallets are deposited on the roof by crane. Boards are attached with fasteners and plates or foam adhesives to the deck, and robotic welders seal the seams in the TPO membrane.

The new roof is resistant to ultraviolet, ozone and chemical exposure, which contributes to a lifespan of more than 20 years, while being virtually maintenance-free. Workers who access the roof to remove debris from the tall trees on the HATC campus can easily stay on the safety-taped walk pad areas. The roof materials are all recyclable later, leading to a very low environmental impact.

Increasing the thermal resistance to an impressive R-21 for the combined roof system, the building now exceeds local, state and international building codes. This added insulation and the reflective white surface of the new roof are going to lower energy consumption and lead to greater indoor comfort and a decreased load on HVAC systems. The roof is much less susceptible to the mold, mildew, and will help prevent water from pooling and ponding as it did on the old roof.

A new commercial roof is a substantial investment. Luckily, with all the cost savings inherent in both the installation process and the whole-life use of high-density polyiso cover boards, companies don’t have to forego state-of-the-art materials for financial reasons. Factoring in the ease of installation (from cutting to less dust) and weight of the cover boards, retrofitting an older building with updated roof systems can be a win-win for both clients and crews.

PHOTOS: HUNTSMAN CORPORATION

TPO System Delivers Energy Efficiency for Company Headquarters

TurnKey Corrections constructed a new 115,000-square-foot in facility in River Falls, Wis.

TurnKey Corrections constructed a new 115,000-square-foot in facility in River Falls, Wis.

If you want it done right, do it yourself. Company owners Todd Westby and Tim Westby take a hands-on approach to running TurnKey Corrections, the River Falls, Wisconsin-based company that provides commissary and jail management services to county corrections facilities nationwide. The Westby brothers also take pride in the fact that TurnKey manufactures the kiosks it provides to its clients and develops and owns the proprietary software used to run them.

So, it’s perhaps not surprising that, when building the company’s new headquarters, Todd Westby, the company’s CEO, founder and general manager, served as the general contractor. Or that he had definite ideas regarding the roofing system that would be installed. Or that he was more than willing to get his hands dirty during the installation process.

Founded in 1998, TurnKey Corrections helps corrections facilities streamline and lower the cost of delivering a variety services to inmates, including commissary, email and email-to-text communication, video visitation, law library access, and paperless intra-facility communication and documentation. Following several years of robust growth, the company had outgrown its three existing buildings. So, it constructed a new 115,000-square-foot facility to bring all operations, including 50,000 square feet of office space and a 65,000 square-foot warehouse where commissary items are stored prior to shipment to corrections facilities, under a single roof and accommodate future success.

“We wanted to be involved in the project from beginning to end so we knew what we were getting and how it was built,” Todd Westby says of the decision to keep construction management in-house. “We wanted to know about anything and everything that was being built for the company in this building.”

In planning the project, Westby initially set two key criteria for the roofing system: that the building would be made watertight as quickly as possible so concrete slab pours and other interior work could be completed, and that the roof would be covered by a warranty of at least 20 years. The design-build firm’s initial plans called for a ballasted EPDM roofing system, but Rex Greenwald, president of roofing contractor TEREX Roofing & Sheet Metal LLC of Minneapolis, suggested a white TPO system, noting that it would meet the quick installation and warranty goals while also enhancing the building’s energy efficiency. Westby was intrigued and, after some research, agreed to the recommendation. In addition to helping reduce cooling costs during summer months, the reflective surface would allow a blanket of snow to remain on the roof during winter months to provide additional insulation.

The TPO roofing system was constructed over a 22-gauge metal fabricated roof deck.

The TPO roofing system was constructed over a 22-gauge metal fabricated roof deck.

The Roof System

The TPO roofing system included a 22-gauge metal fabricated roof deck; two 2.5-inch-thick layers of Poly ISO insulation from Mule-Hide Products Co., with tapered insulation saddles and crickets to aid drainage; and 811 squares of 60-mil white TPO membrane from Mule-Hide Products Co. The insulation and membrane were mechanically attached using the RhinoBond System from OMG Roofing Products. Cast iron roof drains, designed and installed by a plumber, were used rather than scuppers and downspouts—a practice that the TEREX team strongly recommends to prevent freezing during the cold Upper Midwest winters. Walkways lead to the mechanical units, protecting the membrane from damage when maintenance personnel need to access the equipment.

The TEREX team finds the RhinoBond System to be the most efficient and economical attachment method for TPO systems. Specially coated metal plates are used to fasten the insulation to the roof deck and then an electromagnetic welder is used to attach the membrane to the plates. The membrane is not penetrated, eliminating a potential entry point for moisture. And while other mechanical attachment methods require the crew to seam as they go, the RhinoBond System allows them to lay the entire membrane (a task which must be completed in good weather conditions) at once and go back later to induction weld the seams and plates, which can be done when Mother Nature is slightly less cooperative.

Greenwald estimates that the switch from the originally specified ballasted EPDM system to the TPO roofing system and RhinoBond System shaved at least 10 percent off the installation time and reduced the roof weight by 10 pounds per square foot.

Having Westby on-site as the general contractor also sped up the project considerably, Greenwald notes. “He was a huge asset to all of the subcontractors,” he explains. “We could get construction questions answered quickly and could talk through issues and procedures on a timely basis.”

And the most memorable moment in the project for Greenwald was seeing Westby working side-by-side with his crew. “One day we had a delivery truck show up, and Todd jumped on the forklift and helped us unload the truck.”

As sought from the project’s outset, the roofing system is backed by a 20-year, no-dollar-limit labor and material warranty.

With one winter of use in the rearview mirror, the roofing system has exceeded Westby’s expectations. Warehouse space was doubled, but heating costs have been cut in half. The 10-unit heating system also is able to keep the warehouse a uniform temperature, without the cold spots that were common in the old building.

“It really is a beautiful, very efficient and organized-looking roof,” Greenwald says.

Protective Film Sheet Saves Contractors Time and Money

Mule-Hide TPO with CLEAN Film can save contractors time and money while helping them deliver a quality finished product to their customers.

Mule-Hide TPO with CLEAN Film can save contractors time and money while helping them deliver a quality finished product to their customers.

Mule-Hide TPO with CLEAN Film from Mule-Hide Products Co. saves contractors time and money. The final step in any TPO job is removing the dirt and scuffs that are inevitably left behind during installation. Mule-Hide TPO with CLEAN Film from Mule-Hide Products Co. makes this task fast and simple.

The CLEAN Film protects the membrane during installation and then is easily removed, revealing a roof ready for inspection. No cleaning is required and there is no loss of initial solar reflectivity caused by dirt and scuffs that have accumulated during installation.

Mule-Hide TPO with CLEAN Film can be used in re-cover, re-roof and new construction jobs. It is an ideal solution when a reliable water source is unavailable, or when water conservation or water containment/runoff regulations make cleaning with water impractical.

It does not shift and will withstand heat, rain, wind and exposure to ultraviolet radiation without deteriorating. The 5-foot-wide sheets can be easily pulled up by a single crew member splinter-free removal ensured for 90 days after installation.

The CLEAN Film’s gray color also reduces the glare that can make working with white TPO membranes difficult on sunny days. It also enables moisture to evaporate quickly, enhancing crew safety.

Snow-retention System Is for TPO and PVC Membranes

Sno Gem Inc. introduces the Sno Barricade TPO and PVC Membrane Deck Mount Bar snow-retention system.

Sno Gem Inc. introduces the Sno Barricade TPO and PVC Membrane Deck Mount Bar snow-retention system.

Sno Gem Inc., a snow-retention system manufacturer, introduces the Sno Barricade TPO and PVC Membrane Deck Mount Bar snow-retention system. It is a membrane-coated and pre-skirted continuous-bar snow system (patent-pending) for new construction or retrofit applications.

The base plates are custom-coated in either TPO or PVC with a standard white, gray or black. Custom colors are available to match the roofing membrane. To ensure an easy installation, Sno Barricade Membrane-Coated Diamond Series System is available with a pre-skirted target patch, heat-welded directly to the TPO- or PVC-coated base plate. Installers can heat-weld Sno Gem’s target patch to the membrane of the roof, reducing labor cost on a watertight system.

Sno Barricade Systems are available in 1- or 2-inch bar size with single, double or triple bar retention. Square or round bars are offered to best match a building’s aesthetics. The Sno Barricade Plate, an accessory to the system that prevents snow and ice from sliding under the bars, is available in mill finish or custom colors.

GAF Completes Extensive Roof Replacement Project at Corporate Headquarters

GAF has completed an extensive roof replacement project at its new corporate headquarters at 1 Campus Drive in Parsippany, N.J. GAF has been relocating to the new property, which has been completely renovated with quality products in all areas—including, of course, the roof.

GAF worked closely with its Master Select Contractors to ensure the installation of an energy-efficient roofing system at 1 Campus Drive. The system included GAF’s RUBEROID HW 25 Smooth Membrane, EnergyGuard Polyiso Insulation (for high insulation value), and EnergyGuard HD Cover Board (which offers a high R-value and impact resistance). It also included GAF’s single-ply membrane, EverGuard Extreme Fleece-back TPO Membrane. GAF is proud of how EverGuard Extreme Fleece-back TPO Membrane outperforms competitive TPO membranes (based on heat-aging tests), and backs it with a commercial roofing guarantee.

As GAF prepared to move into its corporate headquarters, it was imperative to make sure they had a durable, energy-efficient and easy-to-install roofing system. The combination of GAF EverGuard Extreme Fleece-back TPO Membrane in 2-Part Roofing Adhesive over EnergyGuard HD Cover Board and EnergyGuard Polyiso Insulation set in Olybond, along with RUBEROID HW 25 Smooth Membrane was the perfect system to keep its building dry and comfortable for years to come.

When using EverGuard Extreme Fleece-Back TPO Membrane with Low-Rise Foam Adhesive (compared to EverGuard Extreme Smooth TPO Membrane), the fleece on the back of the membrane provides an added cushioning layer, especially for hail-prone areas. Also, when combining EverGuard Extreme TPO Accessories with EverGuard Extreme Fleece-Back TPO Membrane, it helps save labor (versus field fabrication)—and provides an overall cleaner-looking roof.