Firestone Building Products Announces Master Contractor Award Winners

Firestone Building Products Co. LLC, a manufacturer and supplier of a comprehensive “Roots to Rooftops” product portfolio, announced the 263 firms that earned the 2016 Master Contractor Award. The top-tier companies were selected from a network of more than 3,000 Firestone Building Products Red Shield Licensed Roofing Contractors for delivering exemplary installation, quality of work and customer service.

The Master Contractor Program presents three distinct industry honors annually: The Master Contractor Award, Inner Circle of Quality Award and President’s Club Award. The program’s 2016 winners collectively installed more than 309 million square feet of warranted Firestone Building Products roofing systems on new and reroof projects during 2015.

“Our annual Firestone Building Products Master Contractor Program recognizes top-tier firms for their commitment to excellence and superior workmanship,” says Tim Dunn, president of Firestone Building Products. “Ultimately, the winners’ attention to detail during all installation phases helps ensure long-term roofing system performance. Master Contractor, Inner Circle of Quality and President’s Club award winners represent our best partners in the industry. We are proud of all they have accomplished and look forward to continuing to see them achieve.”

The program’s 2016 award categories and parameters include:

  • Master Contractor
    Master Contractor Award recipients were selected based on the total square footage installed and quality points accumulated for outstanding inspection ratings on systems covered by the Firestone Building Products Red Shield Warranty. Those include: RubberGard EPDM, UltraPly TPO, asphalt and metal roofing systems.

    Master Contractors were also eligible to earn points in the sustainability category. The program recognizes Firestone Building Products’ SkyScape Vegetative Roof System and SunWave Daylighting System.

    To meet the 2016 award requirements, a contractor had to complete a minimum of eight Red Shield warranted jobs during the 2015 calendar year, be in good financial standing with Firestone Building Products, and have a Preferred Quality Incidence Rating (QIR) that did not exceed three times the average QIR for Red Shield Licensed Roofing Contractors. QIR is determined by the annual number of quality incidents per million square feet of roofing under warranty.

  • Inner Circle of Quality
    Master Contractors were eligible for the Inner Circle of Quality Award by installing a minimum of eight warranted Firestone Building Products roofing systems each in 2014 and 2015; and four roofs per year for each of the prior three years. They were also required to maintain at least 2 million square feet of Firestone Building Products roofs under warranty and achieve an annual Quality Incidence Rating (QIR) of 1.0 or less.

  • President’s Club
    Master Contractors who have accrued the highest number of quality points for superior inspection ratings and total square footage of Firestone Building Products Red Shield warranted roofing system installations completed during the past year earned the distinguished President’s Club Award.

Johns Manville Plans to Build Second Production Line at Its Alabama Manufacturing Facility

Johns Manville (JM), a global building and specialty products manufacturer and a Berkshire Hathaway company, announced plans to build a second production line at the company’s Scottsboro, Ala., manufacturing facility. The new line will increase production capacity for JM TPO (thermoplastic polyolefin).

“This significant investment continues JM’s long-standing commitment to our customers, the industry, our employees and the communities in which we serve,” says Mary Rhinehart, JM’s president and CEO.

State and local officials in Alabama welcomed the announcement. “Alabama workers make all kinds of great products, and I am honored that Johns Manville has decided to expand its plant in Scottsboro with new capital investment that means more jobs for Alabama residents,” Gov. Robert Bentley says. “Creating jobs and opportunity in the state is my No. 1 priority, and we are committed to helping Johns Manville achieve success with this project in Jackson County.”

“JM has been an important member of our community for eight years,” says Scottsboro Mayor Melton Potter. “Their recent capacity expansion and the announcement of adding a second line shows JM’s confidence in our workforce to produce the best TPO in the industry. I thank JM for choosing to make this investment in Scottsboro and Jackson County.”

In October 2008, JM’s commitment to single ply manufacturing was solidified with the opening of a state-of-the-art TPO facility in Scottsboro. JM furthered its investment in single ply in 2012 with the opening of an EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) manufacturing plant in Milan, Ohio.

The new TPO production line will bring JM’s total investment in commercial roofing over the past eight years to approximately $200 million. Together with putting money back in the American economy and bringing more than 175 jobs to the manufacturing sector, JM’s continued investments allow growth in the industry and extend JM’s areas of roofing expertise and available products.
To meet recent demand for JM TPO, JM began a capacity expansion project in March 2015 at the Scottsboro plant. Construction was completed in May, and now work will begin to construct the second production line.

“The plant expansion was a huge success and made our Scottsboro facility what is, in our view, the most productive and efficient TPO facility in the U.S., enabling us to meet our customers’ needs for the foreseeable future,” says Jennifer Ford-Smith, JM’s director of Marketing and Single Ply. “This new line will give JM the ability to supply our customers with even more JM TPO than was previously available.”

Senior vice president and general manager Robert Wamboldt says, “We’re proud to be a part of the commercial roofing industry, and we believe our 157-year history demonstrates that we are here to stay. This new production line will help JM meet customer demand and remain a supplier of choice in our industry.”

Projects: Office and Warehouse

BMC ISSAQUAH, ISSAQUAH, WASH.

Because of the steep slope of this roof, the Columbia Roofing & Sheet Metal crew installed 60-mil Sureweld HS (High Slope) TPO.

Because of the steep slope of this roof, the Columbia Roofing & Sheet Metal crew installed 60-mil Sureweld HS (High Slope) TPO.

Team

Roofing Contractor: Columbia Roofing & Sheet Metal, Kent, Wash.
Project Foreman: Rudy Sanchez

Roof Materials

Because of the steep slope of this roof, the Columbia Roofing & Sheet Metal crew installed 60-mil Sureweld HS (High Slope) TPO. HS TPO contains more fire-retardant chemicals in the membrane to help decrease the spread of fire. In addition, 1/4-inch Securock Glass-Mat Roof Board was installed, which gave the building a Class A fire rating while helping protect against moisture and mold.

TPO Manufacturer: Carlisle Syntec Systems
Roof Board Manufacturer: USG

Roof Report

BMC Issaquah manufactures doors and high-end cabinetry. The industrial building features a 525-square barrel roof that was very wet and experienced dry rot. The crew replaced nearly 150 sheets of plywood throughout the project.

The main challenge during installation was safety because of the extreme slope. The barrel roof is nearly 60-feet tall from the bottom to the top of the barrel, making installation on the edges difficult because crewmembers had to hot-air weld rolled product on a nearly vertical surface. The HS TPO added another level of difficulty while welding along the edges.

The project was completed on May 1, 2015.

PHOTO: Columbia Roofing & Sheet Metal

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The Roof Cover: The Cap on the Roof System

For nearly two years in this magazine, I have been discussing the various components that make up a roof system: roof deck, substrate boards, vapor/air retarder, insulation and cover boards (see “More from Hutch”, page 3). Although each component delivers its own unique benefit to the system, they are intended to work together. When designing a roofing system, components cannot be evaluated solely on their own and consideration must be taken for a holistic view of the system; all components must work together synergistically for sustainable performance. Unfortunately, I often have seen that when components are not designed to work within the system unintended consequences occur, such as a premature roof system failure. A roof system’s strength is only as good as its weakest link. The roof cover is the last component in the design of a durable, sustainable roof system—defined previously as being of long-term performance, which is the essence of sustainability.

This ballasted 90-mil EPDM roof was designed for 50 years of service life. All the roof-system components were designed to complement each other. The author has designed numerous ballasted EPDM roofs that are still in place providing service.

PHOTO 1: This ballasted 90-mil EPDM roof was designed for 50 years of service life. All the roof-system components
were designed to complement each other. The author has designed numerous ballasted EPDM roofs that are still in place providing service.

The roof cover for this article is defined as the waterproofing membrane outboard of the roof deck and all other roof-system components. It protects the system components from the effects of climate, rooftop use, foot traffic, bird and insect infestation, and animal husbandry. Without it, there is no roof, no protection and no safety. When mankind moved from cave dwellings to the open, the first thing early humans learned to construct was basic roof-cover protection. Thus, roof covers have been in existence since man’s earliest built environment.

WHAT CONSTITUTES AN APPROPRIATE ROOF COVER?

There is no one roof cover that is appropriate for all conditions and climates. It cannot be codified or prescribed, as many are trying to do, and cannot be randomly selected. I, and numerous other consultants, earn a good living investigating roof failures that result from inappropriate roof-cover and system component selection.

There are several criteria for roof-cover selection, such as:

  • Compatibility with selected adhesives and the substrate below.
  • Climate and geographic factors: seacoast, open plains, hills, mountains, snow, ice, hail, rainfall intensity, as well as micro-climates.
  • Compatibility with the effluent coming out of rooftop exhausts.
  • Local building-code requirements, such as R-value, fire and wind requirements.
  • Local contractors knowledgeable and experienced in its installation.
  • Roof use: Will it be just a roof or have some other use, such as supporting daily foot traffic to examine ammonia lines or have fork lifts driven over it?
  • Building geometry: Can the selected roof cover be installed with success or does the building’s configuration work against you?
  • Building occupancy, relative humidity, interior temperature management, building envelope system, interior building pressure management.
  • Building structural systems that support the enclosure.
  • Interfaces with the adjacent building systems.
  • Environmental, energy conservation and related local code/jurisdictional factors.
  • Delivering on the expectations of the building owner: Is it a LEED building? Does he/she want to go above and beyond roof insulation thermal-value requirements to achieve even better energy savings? Is he/she going to sell the building in the near future?

ROOF-COVER TYPES

There are many types of roof-cover options for the designer. Wood, stone, asphalt, tile, metal, reed, thatch, skins, mud and concrete are all roof covers used around the world in steep-slope applications. This article will examine the low-slope materials.

The dominant roof covers in the low-slope roof market are:

    Thermoset: EPDM

  • Roof sheets joined via tape and adhesive
  • Installed: mechanically fastened, fully adhered or ballasted
  • Thermoplastic: TPO or PVC

  • Roof sheets joined via heat welding
  • Installed: mechanically fastened, fully adhered or plate-bonded (often referred to as the “RhinoBond System”)
  • Asphaltic: modified bitumen

  • Installed in hot asphalt, cold adhesive or torch application
  • EPDM (ETHYLENE PROPYLENE DIENE MONOMER)

    Fully adhered EPDM on this high school in the Chicago suburbs is placed over a cover board, which provides a high degree of protection from hail and foot traffic.

    PHOTO 2: Fully adhered EPDM on this high school in the Chicago suburbs is placed over a cover board, which provides a high degree of protection from hail and foot traffic.


    EPDM is produced in three thicknesses— 45, 60 and 90 mil—with and without reinforcing. It can be procured with a fleece backing in traditional black or with a white laminate on top. The lap seams are typically bonded with seam tape and primer.

    EPDM has a 40-year history of performance; I have 30-year-old EPDM roof systems that I have designed that are still in place and still performing. Available in large sheets—up to 50-feet wide and 200-feet long—with factory-applied seam tape, installation can be very efficient. Fleece-back membrane and 90-mil product have superior hail and puncture resistance. Historical concerns with EPDM lap-seam failure revolved around liquid- applied splice adhesive; with seam tape technology this concern is virtually moot. Non-reinforced ballasted and mechanically fastened EPDM roof membrane can be recycled.

    EPDM can be installed as a ballasted, mechanically fastened or fully adhered system (see photos 1, 2 and 3). In my opinion, ballasted systems offer the greatest sustainability and energy-conservation potential. The majority of systems being installed today are fully adhered. Ballast lost its popularity when wind codes raised the concern of ballast coming off the roof in high-wind events. However, Clinton, Ohio-based RICOWI has observed through inspection that ballasted roofs performed well even in hurricane-prone locations when properly designed (see ANSI-SPRI RP4).

    PHOTOS: HUTCHINSON DESIGN GROUP LTD

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Stop Leaks Around Vent Pipes

The Perma-Boot is a gasket-less, high-performance pipe boot system designed to permanently repair the most common type of roof leak—the leak around the vent pipes that penetrate the roof.

The Perma-Boot is a gasket-less, high-performance pipe boot system designed to permanently repair the most common type of roof leak—the leak around the vent pipes that penetrate the roof.

The Perma-Boot is a gasket-less, high-performance pipe boot system designed to permanently repair the most common type of roof leak—the leak around the vent pipes that penetrate the roof. Perma-Boot slides over an existing boot, preventing future leaks. Installation takes a few minutes; no tools are required. The product is designed for all standard roof pitches: 3:12 to 12:12. It is made of durable TPO and guaranteed for the life of the shingles.

Coating Extends the Life of Aging Roofs

The new Silicone Roof Coating System from Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc. can be used to restore and repair asphalt, modified bitumen, metal, concrete, TPO, PVC and EPDM roof systems.

The new Silicone Roof Coating System from Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc. can be used to restore and repair asphalt, modified bitumen, metal, concrete, TPO, PVC and EPDM roof systems.

The new Silicone Roof Coating System from Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc. can be used to restore and repair asphalt, modified bitumen, metal, concrete, TPO, PVC and EPDM roof systems. It includes a cleaner to prepare the substrate for priming; two primers to improve adhesion of the topcoat; a multipurpose sealant for use with reinforcement roofing fabric to complete repair and maintenance tasks; three topcoats—Silicone Roof Coating (available in white and gray), Silicone Masonry Wall Coating (available in white and gray) and Silicone Skylight Coating; and a cleaner to wash tools and equipment. All products are solvent-free and comply with VOC regulations throughout North America.

GAF Acquires Quest Construction Products

GAF announced it has completed the acquisition of Quest Construction Products (QCP), a former division of Quest Specialty Chemicals and a supplier of fluid-applied roofing systems and roof-coating products in North America. The transaction, which also provides GAF with a strong presence in coating solutions for pavement and vertical surfaces, is expected to accelerate the robust growth of GAF’s commercial business.

QCP brings excellent brands and product lines to GAF including the Hydro-Stop family of liquid membrane products, the United Coatings line of coating solutions, and the StreetBond pavement coatings. The acquisition instantly gives GAF a position in a high-tech, environmentally friendly, and economically efficient segment of the commercial roofing business.

QCP’s strategically positioned geographic footprint and unique technical expertise in the field will provide GAF with additional solutions to bring to its customers. QCP’s products have gained rapid acceptance in the marketplace due largely to their reflectivity, ease of application, and energy-efficiency. These highly practical and effective products will complement GAF’s existing offerings of roofing technologies and commercial solar solutions.

“This acquisition combines a North American manufacturer and marketer of roofing products with a producer of fluid-applied solutions,” says Bob Tafaro, president and CEO of GAF. “We have acquired excellent brands and will provide an enhanced platform for their growth. QCP’s differentiated and innovative products will also boost our commercial business’s competitive advantage by offering a broader range of solutions to the market. We are empowering our contractors with the products they need to grow their businesses while strengthening our relationships with strategic building owners.”

“This acquisition demonstrates GAF’s ongoing commitment to growth and leadership in the commercial roofing industry. It is in keeping with the extraordinary investments we have made and continue to make to add capacity and gain share in commercial solutions such as insulation (ISO), TPO, and PVC single-ply membranes. We know that the QCP team will further enrich our culture of achievement, and we look forward to working together on a smooth integration.”

NRCA Releases Market Survey on Sales Volume Trends

The National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) has released its 2014-15 market survey providing information about overall sales volume trends in the roofing industry, roofing experiences, material usage and regional breakdowns. It is an important tool to measure the scope of the U.S. roofing industry, and the data provides a glimpse into which roof systems are trending in the low- and steep-slope roofing markets.

This year’s survey reports sales volumes for 2014 and 2015 projections averaged between $7 million and just more than $8 million, respectively, and revealed a near-steady ratio of low- to steep-slope sales of 72 percent to 28 percent.

For low-slope roofs, TPO remains the market leader with a 31 percent share of the new construction market and 26 percent of the reroofing market for 2014. Asphalt shingles continue to dominate the steep-slope roofing market with a 44 percent market share for new construction and a 58 percent share for reroofing.

Polyisocyanurate insulation continues to lead its sector of the market with 75 percent of new construction and 70 percent of reroofing work.

In addition, roof cover board installation for 2014 was reported as 24 percent in new construction, 46 percent in reroofing tear-offs and 30 percent in re-cover projects.

NRCA’s market survey enables roofing contractors to compare their material usage with contractors in other regions, and provides manufacturers and distributors with data to analyze, which can affect future business decisions.

SFS intec Receives FM Approvals Certificate for Induction Welding System

SFS intec received an FM Approvals Class 4470 Certificate of Compliance from FM Approvals for isoweld.

SFS intec received an FM Approvals Class 4470 Certificate of Compliance from FM Approvals for its induction welding system, isoweld.

SFS intec, Wyomissing, Pa., has recently received an FM Approvals Class 4470 Certificate of Compliance from FM Approvals, part of FM Global, for isoweld. isoweld is SFS intec’s induction welding system. This certificate approves use of isoweld for attachment of thermoplastic single-ply membranes (PVC and TPO) within roofing systems offered by several single-ply membrane original equipment manufacturers (OEMS).

GAF Plans to Open PVC Manufacturing Line in Cedar City, Utah

GAF announced plans to open a PVC manufacturing line at its commercial roofing plant in Cedar City, Utah. The line, which GAF expects to become operational as early as mid-2016, will transform the Cedar City operation into a full-service manufacturer and supplier of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) single-ply membranes, as well as polyisocyanurate (ISO) insulation.

GAF also announced that it is actively considering locations for an additional plant in the eastern U.S. that will manufacture PVC, TPO and ISO. Known for its flexibility, ease of application and chemical resistance, PVC remains a single-ply solution among commercial roofing contractors.

“The Cedar City PVC line will strengthen GAF’s position as a full-service supplier of PVC, TPO and ISO. By manufacturing all three products at Cedar City and soon on the east coast, we will deliver economies of scale to our operations and quality service to our customers. This investment demonstrates our continued commitment to growth and leadership in the low-slope roofing market,” says Bob Tafaro, president and CEO of GAF.

“GAF is poised to leverage our track record of innovation and operational excellence. We’re ready to bring to the PVC market the same ingenuity and manufacturing expertise that have helped us to manufacture best-in-class TPO products.”