IMPs Are Key to Construction of New Warehouse at Manufacturing Complex

The new warehouse at the Komatsu manufacturing complex in Longview, Texas, features insulated metal panels from Metl-Span in both the roof and wall systems. Photos: LMCurbs

When a warehouse at the Komatsu manufacturing complex in Longview, Texas, sustained extensive tornado damage, the company decided to build a new, state-of-the-art warehouse in its place.

Komatsu turned to a trusted business partner, Transet Co., a Longview-based design-build contractor, to demolish the old structure and construct its 81,438-square-foot replacement. The new warehouse features insulated metal panels (IMPs) from Metl-Span in both the roof and wall systems, as well as a permanent rooftop walkway system from LMCurbs, which was installed to facilitate ongoing maintenance of the rooftop HVAC units.

According to Dale Pickard, project manager for Transet Co., the IMPs not only made for smooth construction, but they helped the warehouse meet building envelope energy requirements.

Challenges on the project included a tight schedule, unseasonably rainy weather and accommodating nearby manufacturing facilities that were continuously operational.

The LMCurbs Roofwalk System was installed to facilitate ongoing maintenance of the rooftop HVAC units and protect the roof.

The scope of work included the removal of the previous structure and subgrade remediation. After the footings and slab were in place, the Pre-Engineered Metal Building (PEMB) was erected. The system was supplied by Houston-based Mid-West Steel Building Co. and erected by Cannon Steel Erection Co., located in Tyler, Texas.

After the metal frame and roof purlins were in place, Cannon Steel Erection installed the IMPs to complete the wall and roof systems. “You basically go in sequence from left to right with the IMP roofing panels,” Pickard explains. “You just start at one end, work to the other end, and then come back and install the panels on the other side. It’s basically a straight line process from one end to the other.”

The roofing panels were 42 inches wide and 4 1/2 inches thick and incorporated a standing seam. “The panels attach at the purlin with a concealed fastener clip,” says Pickard. “The IMP has a finished skin on the upper and lower sides.”

The seams were hand crimped and then mechanically seamed. At the eave, a gutter system was installed after the roof and wall panels were tied in together.

Workers on the roof were tied off with personal fall arrest systems and retractable lifelines attached to non-penetrating temporary anchor points. “All facets of construction safety were of paramount importance to Transet Co.,” Pickard states. “Safety was and is the first order of business for everybody.”

Completing the Roof Installation

The roof system features Kingspan skylights, which were installed using custom curbs supplied by LMCurbs, headquartered in Longview, Texas. LMCurbs also supplied curbs for the HVAC units, as well as the rooftop walkway system.

The LMCurbs Roofwalk System was installed using H90 clamps from S-5!

The walkway was installed after all of the HVAC equipment was in place and the roof system was completed. The LMCurbs Roofwalk System was designed to provide a safe way to access HVAC equipment while protecting the roof. “It’s basically a roof access area for the maintenance personnel to enter,” Pickard says. “It’s a railed walkway gated at one corner of the building for access, and it goes to each one of the rooftop units (RTUs). In all, there is more than 1,400 linear feet of walkway.”

The system was mounted using S-5! H90 clamps. “There were no penetrations in the roof,” Pickard points out. “It’s a durable system that will protect the owner’s investment in the roof.”

According to Aaron Combs, product manager at LMCurbs, the project was one of the first to use the company’s redesigned LMCurbs Roofwalk System with upgraded handrails. “It was designed to be both a better looking, more professional end product for the building owner, and a more user-friendly system for the installers in the field,” Combs says. “The new handrail assembly utilizes Speed-Rail fitting by Hollaender and is now down to four pieces — from 28— so the number of man-hours needed to install the system is drastically reduced. It also streamlined the warehousing and distribution process because the redesigned support plates eliminated multiple manufacturing processes. With this redesign and stackable plates, we are able to maintain better stocking levels and provide our customers with a faster shipping timeframe.”

Field installations often present unique and unforeseen obstacles. On this project, when the location of some HVAC units was adjusted from the initial layout, Combs was ready to help ensure the walkway would be installed correctly. “We are always available to offer advice and technical support, and that can be especially important with a first-time installer,” Combs says. “They can contact us any time and we can help walk them through it and assist with any issues that might arise.”

Work began in April 2019 and wrapped up February 2020. “We had a wet start, which made soil remediation difficult,” notes Pickard. “In the latter part of our project, we had an extremely wet January and February, and that presented challenges in erection and finish out. Despite the bad weather, the building came together ahead of schedule.”

Coordinating all phases of the project at an active manufacturing campus also posed some logistical hurdles. “The existing plant, of course, was in operation the entire time,” recalls Pickard. “The site where the new warehouse was being built was where the old warehouse facility was, and the existing loading dock had to remain in operation until they were in the new building. That encroached on the footprint of the new facility.”

Final touches included new loading docks, interior offices and restrooms. “This project shows our ability to deliver an outcome that meets the client’s needs from design to finished product — safely, under budget, and ahead of schedule,” notes Pickard.

“It demonstrates our ability to provide a first-class warehouse facility for the owner. We’ve been doing it a long time. Our company has been in business for 38 years. We are a safety-oriented company with vast experience in most phases of commercial, industrial, and institutional construction, and we are there for our customers.”

TEAM

Design Builder: Transet Co., Longview, Texas, www.transetco.com

Engineer: Johnson & Pace Inc.,Longview, Texas, www.johnsonpace.com

Steel Erector: Cannon Steel Erection Co., Tyler, Texas, www.cannonsteel.com

PEMB Supplier: Mid-West Steel Building Co., Houston, Texas, www.mid-weststeel.com

Rooftop Curb and Walkway Supplier: LMCurbs, Longview, Texas, www.lmcurbs.com

MATERIALS

Roof and Wall Panels: Insulated Metal Panels, Metl-Span, www.metlspan.com

Rooftop Curbs: LMCurbs, www.lmcurbs.com

Rooftop Walkway: LMCurbs Roofwalk System

Rooftop Walkway Clamps: H90 Clamps, S-5!, www.s-5.com

Skylights: Kingspan, www.kingspanlightandair.us

Colorful Exterior for Veterinary Hospital Comes Together Without a Hitch

The Kimbrough Animal Hospital in Longview, Texas, features a colorful exterior constructed of metal roof and wall panels. Photos: Petersen

Kimbrough Animal Hospital in Longview, Texas, is designed to provide top-notch care for its furry patients. The building includes surgical suites, treatment areas, and an in-house lab, as well as boarding and grooming facilities.

The state-of-the-art facility is housed in a striking complex highlighted by colorful metal roof and wall panels. It was a complicated new construction project on a tight jobsite, but experience and planning made for a smooth, textbook execution.

Complicated projects are nothing new for Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal. Headquartered in Longview, Texas, the company has been in business for 33 years and does a variety of commercial, industrial and residential work, including modified bitumen, built-up, single-ply and shingle roofs, as well as metal roofing and sheet metal fabrication. “We did all the metal on the project,” says Anthony McKinley, vice president of Curtis-McKinley. “We did the roof, the walls and soffit.”

McKinley was confident his crews could execute the project smoothly, and his confidence was bolstered by his experience working on other projects with the general contractor, Transet Company, and the manufacturer of the roof and wall panels, Petersen.

“We have a good relationship with Transet Company and we’ve done so much work with Petersen that they know our company and our guys,” McKinley says. “If there are any technical questions, they are very quick to help and get us answers, and inspections go great.”

The Roof and Walls

The roof and wall panels were manufactured from 24-gauge steel. The roof was covered with approximately 18,000 square feet of 18-inch PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels in Charcoal. The exterior also incorporates 4,400 square feet of 16-inch HWP panels in Slate Gray and 5,250 square feet of 12-inch Flush Panels in three colors: Slate Gray, Teal and Berkshire Blue.

The roof is comprised of Petersen’s 18-inch PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels in Charcoal. Photos: Petersen

Crews from Curtis-McKinley dried the roof in with TAMKO’s TW Metal and Tile self-adhered underlayment and tackled different phases of the project as the building came together. “We kind of did it all at one time,” McKinley recalls. “First, we had a roofing crew come out and put the peel-and-stick on the roof, and we measured for the roof panels. Then we started installing all of the trim and had a few guys start installing the wall panels.”

Petersen fabricated and delivered the wall panels, which were installed over plywood and cinder block walls using a man lift. On the cinder block walls, hat channels were installed to receive the clips. At two entrances, the Flush Panels were installed vertically. “We also installed regular flush soffit panels,” notes McKinley.

A representative from Petersen roll-formed the roof panels on the site. Some of the panels were more than 50 feet long, and this posed some logistical problems. “It was a very tight construction site,” McKinley explains. “We ran the panels on site and we had to lift them up with a crane. We couldn’t use a lift because there was no way to turn the lift around when the panels were loaded. There was one long driveway down one side, and we had to stack all of the panels in one direction and lift them straight up.”

Panels were lifted using a spreader bar as a cradle. “We strapped the panels to the spreader bar,” McKinley notes. “We only lifted about 10 panels at a time and our guys would receive them and stack them at points along the roof. We had about six or seven guys on the roof and the rest of the crew on the ground to strap down the panels.”

The walls feature Petersen’s 24-gauge HWP and Flush Panels in multiple colors, including Slate Gray, Teal and Berkshire Blue. Photos: Petersen

The crew started installing panels on the main roof and finished roof sections alongside the structure as the job progressed. Crew members were tied off 100 percent of the time, using temporary anchor points screwed into in the deck. “We started off on the main roof area and worked our way from the back to the front,” McKinley recalls. “The shed roofs were incorporated as we worked our way forward.”

While the main crew worked on the roof, a smaller group sometimes split off to install the wall panels. “We had a crew with a few extra sheet metal guys on it, and we moved them around as needed,” McKinley notes. “That way they could start on the walls as the roof progressed and the job wouldn’t lag on.”

Planning Ahead

The main challenge on the project was the tight jobsite, according to McKinley. “It was a very limited site,” McKinley says. “Once we got the roof panels on, we could breathe a little easier.”

Despite the cramped conditions, communication between the crews kept conflicts to a minimum. “Working with other trades went fine,” McKinley says. “The superintendent on the site was easy to work with. We worked with other subcontractors in Longview we’ve worked with plenty of times. Our guys knew their guys, basically, and they just coordinate well and work around each other as needed.”

The project moved along smoothly and stayed on schedule. “We were blessed not to have any big weather delays,” McKinley says. “When they were ready for us, we were able to get right out there and move things along in a timely manner.”

McKinley also credits the manufacturer for help executing the project. “There are four or five different colors on it,” he says. “Each entrance was a different color, and the walls and roof. That was pretty interesting. Keeping it all straight with the guys was a challenge.”

Again, planning ahead was essential. “It just took a little more communication,” McKinley says. “When we were making our trim, we just had to make sure it was the right color. It’s very easy to work with Petersen. On a job like this one, the technical aspect of it was really very simple, but seeing all of the different colors on this project come together was pretty cool.”

Curtis-McKinley crew members were able to execute all of the transition details themselves as they installed the roof and wall panels. “They were all standard details, really,” McKinley says. “Almost all of the transitions were something the guys have done hundreds of times.”

Exceptions included the large, irregularly shaped windows at the entryways, which were trimmed in red. “There were two entrances with windows that were a little different,” McKinley says. “One set had a sort of triangular shape, which was pretty straightforward to flash. The other had a circular window, and that took a lot of time and coordination with the window people to ensure that we got it watertight with the flashing. Getting the trim for that wall custom made and fitting perfectly was a bit of a challenge.”

Taking a complicated project and making it look easy is one of the strengths of Curtis-McKinley Roofing. “The key is having the right guys,” McKinley says. “We are blessed to have very experienced professional roofers and sheet metal installers. Our sheet metal guys have done this for years. That’s getting harder to find these days, and we still have some older guys that know how to do it. They’ve done so much of it that I often rely on them to tell me, ‘This is how it needs to be done,’ or ‘This is a better way to do it.’ Then we just make sure everything conforms to the plans and specifications, and we ensure the installation integrity. Obviously the most important thing is to keep the water out.”

TEAM

Architect: Ron Mabry Architects, Tyler, Texas, www.ronmabryarchitects.com

General Contractor: Transet Co., Longview, Texas, www.transetco.com

Roofing Contractor: Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal, Longview, Texas, www.curtismckinleyroofing.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: 18-inch, 24-gauge PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad in Charcoal, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Wall Panels: 16-inch, 24-gauge HWP, Slate Gray and 12-inch, 24-gauge Flush Panel in Slate Gray, Teal, and Berkshire Blue, Petersen

Underlayment: TW Metal and Tile, TAMKO, www.tamko.com