Atlas Roofing’s Summit 60 Underlayment Goes Pink For Breast Cancer Awareness

In honor of breast cancer awareness, Atlas Roofing’s premiere lightweight synthetic roofing underlayment Summit 60 is going pink, with a portion of the sales proceeds to support the Susan G. Komen breast cancer foundation.

For every roll of Summit 60 sold — including traditional and limited-edition pink ribbon rolls — from Aug. 15 to Oct. 15, 2019, Atlas Roofing will donate $2 to the foundation. The Summit 60 Pink special-edition rolls will be embellished with pink branding and pink ribbons, the international symbol of breast cancer awareness. The special-edition Summit 60 will be available to contractors exclusively through Atlas Roofing distributors.

Tracy Cook, director of marketing for Atlas, said the special-edition rolls are aimed at bringing more attention to breast cancer, including early detection and research for a cure. For Cook, the cause is close to her heart. Her mother had breast cancer in the early 1990s.

“Treatment has come a long way since 1991, but it has a long way to go. Indeed, early detection is key,” Cook said. “Many of my family members have had cancer — breast, lung, oral and prostate. In every case, it’s about early detection.”

Designed To Protect
Summit 60 is designed to optimize the life of a roof system through superior water resistance and UV protection, protecting against water intrusion and mold growth. Made from a woven polymeric scrim, Summit 60 is designed for increased strength, reduced slippage between the underlayment and the roof sheathing and improved walkability during installation. The materials will not warp, buckle or crack over time like other organic felt brands. The UV coating provides 60-day protection from the sun while the roof is being installed.

Supporting Cancer Research And Early Detection
The Susan G. Komen foundation launched in 1982 and has since funded more than $988 million in research and more than $2.2 billion in education, screenings and treatment programs. Due to the worldwide efforts by the foundation and others, breast cancer mortality has declined 40% from 1989 to 2016.

However, more work needs to be done. Today, about 12% of women (or 1 in 8) will develop invasive breast cancer in her lifetime. In 2019 alone, an estimated 268,600 women and 2,670 men will be diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. An estimated 41,760 women and 500 men will die from breast cancer in 2019.

“Cancer of all types has touched everyone in the United States in one way or another. Since breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers among American women, it has impacted so many of us,” Tiara Searcy, content and digital marketing manager for Atlas Roofing, said. “We hope our efforts with Summit 60 will help make for a healthier future.”

Partners In Pink
Atlas Roofing is proud to help in the fight against breast cancer and supports the outstanding work of the Susan G. Komen foundation.

“The goal of our pink campaign is to provide much-needed funding for critical research and public education,” explained Kirk Villar, vice president of sales and marketing for Atlas. “We are honored to join forces with the community to take a stand against breast cancer.”

Summit 60 Pink will be available across the country. For more information, contractors should contact their Atlas Roofing representative.

For more information, visit AtlasRoofing.com

Underlayment Designed Metal Roofing Is Suitable For Any Roof Material, Climate

Boral Roofing offers its MetalSeal Underlayment, a high-temperature self-adhered underlayment designed especially for metal roofing but suitable for any roof material in any climate. A high-performance waterproofing material, Boral MetalSeal underlayment provides all-season durable protection, protecting the structure against wind, rain, snow and ice dams by bonding to the base sheet or directly to the roof deck and self-sealing around every fastener penetration. According to the company, Boral MetalSeal is easy to install and eliminates the need for an excessive number of nails, reducing installation time and cost. Great surface traction also enables safer, faster and easier installation for the entire roof. The high-strength woven polyester surface remains intact under high foot traffic and provides UV resistance up to six months.

According to the manufacturer, Boral MetalSeal offers a 30-year limited warranty and may be installed in freezing or hot summer temperatures alike, ensuring the job is completed without weather-induced delay. MetalSeal meets or exceeds all National and Florida building code requirements and is rated up to 260 degrees Fahrenheit. It comes in 216-square-foot rolls for a net two squares.

LEARN MORE

Visit: www.boralroof.com

Call: (800) 669-8453

Vapor Permeable Underlayment Designed for Use on Steep-Slope Roofs

VaproShield announces the release of SlopeShield Plus Self-Adhered, a highly vapor-permeable roofing underlayment Air Barrier (AB) material. SlopeShield Plus Self-Adhered (SA), a vapor permeable roofing underlayment, is designed for use on steep slope roofs of 2:12 or greater pitch. According to the manufacturer, the roofing underlayment features the patent-pending Vapor Permeable Polymer Composite Technology (VPPCT) developed by VaproShield.

“VPPCT combines advanced polymer coatings and our proprietary adhesive to create a primerless, highly-permeable, and fully-adhered [roofing] underlayment that is revolutionary to the industry. The black color also absorbs heat from the sun (while exposed), which increases the drying process of wet sheathing and insulation,” said Kevin Nolan, Technical Director of North America. “Every part of SlopeShield Plus, including the color, was intentional.” 

The development of SlopeShield Plus Self-Adhered came from an existing market demand for a high-performance and permeable roofing underlayment. Traditional asphaltic and butyl-based peel-and-stick roofing underlayments offer liquid-water holdout but lack drying capacity due to their non-permeable nature. These underlayments inherently trap moisture, reducing insulation performance and accelerating sheathing decay-potentially causing premature roof assembly failure.

“The industry has had traditional [asphaltic and butyl-based] underlayments for years. We are always working to push the industry forward,” noted Lee Snyder, Managing Partner of VaproShield.

SlopeShield Plus Self-Adhered offers superior performance to the polypropylene tri-laminate micro-porous permeable existing roof underlayments. The superior construction technology of SlopeShield Plus Self-Adhered is a composite of polymers and polyester in a sheet good that allows vapor diffusion. According to the company, the design of SlopeShield Plus Self-Adhered eliminates the water leakage created by the concussion effect (caused by heavy rain and foot traffic) while allowing for 6-month UV and climate exposure prior to roof system installation.

SlopeShield Plus Self-Adhered is compatible with metal roofing, slate/clay tile with batten/counter-batten substructures, and cedar shingles/shakes with VaproMat. VaproShield offers SlopeFlashing in two sizes: 29.5 inches and 19 2/3 inches. SlopeFlashing is used to flash eaves, hips, ridges and valleys.

Combining SlopeShield Plus SA and VaproShield’s vapor permeable WRB/Air Barrier wall membranes will create an airtight and watertight building enclosure that offers high drying capacity for the building envelope and roofing assembly-mitigating moisture damage and saving energy for the life of the building. A National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) study (NISTIR 7238) showed that an effective air barrier can reduce a building’s energy costs by as much as 40 percent and electrical costs by more than 25 percent.

For more information, visit www.vaproshield.com.

Redesigned High-Temp Underlayment Offers Improved Walkability, Reduced Bleed-Through

Polyglass U.S.A. Inc. announces that Polystick MU-X self-adhered, high-temperature underlayment has been redesigned. A secondary water barrier for roof coverings, Polystick MU-X features an enhanced black polypropylene film, improving membrane walkability and reducing bleed-through.

Polystick MU-X is designed especially for high-temperature environments. It is rated as temperature resistant to 250 degrees Fahrenheit and has an exposure window of 90 days for job flexibility. Polystick MU-X features a proprietary SBS modified bitumen upper compound and patented ADESO dual-compound self-adhered technology on the bottom side of the reinforcement. A split-release film on the bottom of the roll allows for ease of application. Convenient 3-inch lay lines printed on both edges allow bi-directional installation, saving time and labor. 

“We are excited about the performance improvements we have made to the Polystick MU-X underlayment,” said Polyglass CEO Natalino Zanchetta. “We made the enhancements based on customer feedback and our commitment to adding value by meeting or exceeding customer expectations and increasing customer satisfaction.” 

For more information, visit https://polyglass.us.

Self-Adhering, High-Temperature Roofing Underlayment

MFM Building Products, a manufacturer of a full envelope of waterproofing and weather barrier products for the building industry, offers a new high-temperature roofing underlayment, Premium HT Tile & Metal.

This self-adhering roofing underlayment is composed of a high-grade, reinforced polyester fabric laminated to a high-temperature asphalt adhesive system. This premium product also has a fiberglass-reinforced core for extreme durability. Product features a 3-inch (7 cm) selvedge edge to ensure a secure, monolithic seal. The surface fabric offers excellent foot traction and for stacking tiles during construction. UV exposure is 180 days.

Premium HT Tile & Metal is intended to be used as a whole-roof underlayment. It will withstand the high temperatures created by metal and tile roofing with a high temperature rating of 250°F (121°C). The top surface bonds well with foam adhesive systems and works well with nail-down tile roofs. It may also be used underneath cedar shakes, and synthetic or asphalt shingles. Premium HT Tile & Metal is self-sealing around common roofing fasteners to ensure a complete waterproof barrier.

The underlayment has a nominal thickness of 60 mils and is available in a 36 inch x 67 feet (91 cm x 20.4 m) roll size. Product meets ASTM D 1970 and TAS 103-95 through independent, third-party testing, and has been submitted for product approvals. Premium HT Tile & Metal comes with a 30-Year Limited Warranty.

For full technical data, installation instructions or to request a free product sample, visit www.mfmbp.com

Expert Tips For Shingling A Cone-Shaped Roof

Cone-shaped roofs are one of those projects that contractors either love to do or avoid like the plague.

A prominent architectural feature on Queen Anne- and Norman-style homes, cone-shaped roofs are also found on Armenian and Georgian churches and medieval towers and castles. Their sloping and curved geometric surfaces can be difficult and labor intensive to shingle, especially for roofers who are accustomed to working only with straight lines.

Whereas a simple pitched roof typically has two or more sides and a hip roof has at least four sides, a conical or turret-style roof can appear to have an infinite number of sides. Some cone-shaped roofs have three to eight flat sides that create more of a geometric shape, such as a pyramid.

So, the challenge is: How do you install flat shingles on this intricate, rounded surface?

The underlayment should be applied vertically, perpendicular to the eave, as shown in this figure from the ARMA Technical Bulletin titled “How to Shingle a Cone Roof.” (Copyright Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, reprinted with permission.)

Getting Started

Thanks to their flexibility, modern asphalt shingles can be installed on roofs of any shape.

To begin shingling a cone roof, you need to know three measurements: the length of the rafter, the diameter of the cone and the widest piece of shingle you’ll be using.

To determine the distance around the base of the cone, multiply its diameter by 3.14. For example, if the diameter is 20 feet, the perimeter would equal 62.8 feet. With a 12-inch-wide shingle, you would need 63 shingles in each row around the cone.

Precise calculations are necessary because shingle pieces will need to change shape and become narrower as you move from the base of the cone up to its peak.

Cutting the shingles is a task you can do ahead of time, by creating a template, or when you get to a particular part of the installation.

Safety Concerns

Because cone-shaped roofs are usually steep and high off the ground, consider hammering footholds into the roof for stable support while you work. Better yet, use scaffolding, which not only provides a platform for leaning a ladder onto the roof, it also serves as an easily accessible shelf for your roofing materials and tools.

On a flat-sided cone roof, use the standard hip and ridge installation method. (Copyright Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, reprinted with permission.)

Underlayment and Ventilation

With preparations complete and safety equipment in place, you’re ready for the fun part: installation.

First, start by applying a good quality underlayment to the deck per the manufacturer’s instructions.

The underlayment should be applied vertically, perpendicular to the eave, following the flow pattern from the cone’s peak to its base. This process will help to prevent the material from wrinkling or buckling. You should end up with an overlap near the peak, which can be trimmed during underlayment application and before installing shingles.

Continue to overlap the underlayment vertically as you progress up the cone and use asphalt plastic cement to cement the lap edge. Alternatively, you can use a peel-and-stick underlayment. A self-adhering underlayment protects the eaves and flashing from wind-driven rain and covers any possible gaps between abutting shingles.

Next, check the ventilation. If the cone is open to the attic area, it should be part of the ventilation system. To accommodate static ventilation in the main portion of the attic, increase the requirement for the net-free area by the same square footage as the cone-shaped room. If the area is open to the living space, a ceiling fan can help force moisture and heat from the cone-shaped room to the main living area for dispersal. Using a room dehumidifier may also be helpful.

When working with a completely circular cone, use an off-peak, roll-type ridge vent at the peak for positive ventilation. The formula for cone-shaped rooms is consistent with any other residential area:

  • Equal intake and exhaust vents: 300 square feet of attic area = 1 square foot of net-free vent area
  • Exhaust vents only: 150 square feet of attic area = 1 square foot of net-free vent area

In cases with no ventilation, make the homeowner aware of potential issues with accelerated wear and how it can affect the product’s warranty. For more specific requirements, contact the shingle manufacturer.

Shingling Flat-Sided vs. Rounded Cones

After installing underlayment and addressing ventilation, you can start applying shingles.

When shingling a rounded cone roof, divide the roof into three distinct zones. (Copyright Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, reprinted with permission.)

If you’re working with a flat-sided cone roof, you can use the standard hip and ridge installation method. Snap vertical chalk lines from the cone tip to the eave center on each of the flat sides. Then apply shingles to the flat areas, cutting at the hips or joints. Use a standard hip and ridge shingle to complete the hip joints.

To ensure a continuous roofing line, snap horizontal chalk lines around the cone so that shingles will line up on adjacent sides.

Shingles on steep-sided cone roofs — those greater than 21/12 slope — may need to be hand sealed with asphalt plastic cement. Check the manufacturer’s instructions for steep-slope application.

When shingling a rounded cone roof, you won’t have a horizontal line to follow because of the curvature. If you try to create a line, butting the sides of the shingles together, the shingles will gradually curve downward and won’t correctly align when you encircle the cone.

To make installation easier, divide the roof into three distinct zones. Start applying shingles to zone one, at the bottom of the cone, and then work your way up to zones two and three.

While you are nailing, have another crew member help hold the shingles down around the curve so they are flush against the surface.

Side overlap of shingles is more noticeable in the upper portions of each cone. Trim shingles at an angle to make the joint parallel to water flow. (Copyright Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, reprinted with permission.)

Because the cone shape tapers from the base to the peak, succeeding courses require less material.

The degree of horizontal offset and varied shingle cutouts will create a random appearance. When using standard three-tab shingles, trim each shingle for proper vertical alignment. A simpler alternative would be to use a randomly applied shingle that doesn’t need to be vertically aligned.

Shingling a cone-shaped roof may be challenging, but with the proper knowledge and execution, you can restore this architectural focal point to its full glory.

For more information from Atlas Roofing, including technical bulletins, installation instructions and product data sheets, visit atlasroofing.com.

Synthetic and Peel-and-Stick Underlayments for Metal Roofing

HydraShell MAX and HydraShell Supreme SA are McElroy Metal’s new underlayments. HydraShell MAX is the standard synthetic underlayment and HydraShell Supreme SA is a peel-and-stick underlayment. HydraShell MAX has a four-layer construction and can be used under all types of finished roofing materials, including steel roofing and is suitable for roof pitches as low as ½:12. HydraShell MAX requires significantly fewer fasteners than competitive products and provides a durable deck cover. HydraShell Supreme SA is the best choice in high-temperature, self-adhering applications. The SBS modified asphalt provides excellent pliability and the cool gray surface reduces heat build-up. 

For more information, visit www.mcelroymetal.com.

Granulated Self-Adhered Roofing Underlayment Features Slip-Resistant Surface

RhinoRoof Granulated Self-Adhered Roofing Underlayment The RhinoRoof brand of synthetic roofing underlayment now includes comprehensive roof deck protection. Comprised of the most advanced formulations for self-adhered roofing technology, new RhinoRoof Granulated Self-Adhered Roofing underlayment features a granulated, slip-resistant surface. The new synthetic underlayment offering complements contractors’ safety programs by providing a slip-resistant surface material on roofs of varying slopes. When paired with RhinoRoof U20 synthetic underlayment, the Granulated Self-Adhered Roofing Underlayment provides a system approach to protecting the entire roof deck against ice dams and wind-driven rains.

“RhinoRoof Granulated Self-Adhered Roofing Underlayment provides protection in the most vulnerable areas of the roof such as eaves and valleys,” said Jim Stange, Product Manager for Self-Adhered Underlayment. He noted the “peel and stick” product offers excellent adhesion across a broad temperature range. “The new granulated self-adhesive underlayment has been tested for adhesion at 40F and 75F and exceeds D1970 standards,” he said. The product can be left exposed for up to 30 days. Even at cold temperatures, the RhinoRoof® Granulated Self-Adhered Roofing Underlayment adheres to the roof deck, supporting flexible installation during seasons when temperatures can fluctuate widely.

Accroding to the company, multiple features contribute to the performance of RhinoRoof Granulated Self-Adhered Roofing Underlayment. The granulated surface features a 3-inch taped selvage edge and a polymer modified asphalt backing. The split sheet peel-away release liner facilitates easy installation on a broad range of roof designs. The product is packaged in a shrink-wrapped poly-sleeve, making it less susceptible to damage from the elements and easy to carry on the jobsite.

For more information, visit www.eavetopeak.com.

Metal Roof and Wall Panels Capture the Spirit of Shakespearean Theater

The Otto M. Budig Theater is the home of the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. The new theater was designed by GBBN Architects in Cincinnati. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp

For many new arenas and theaters, the sheer size and scope of the project can pose the biggest hurdles. At the new Otto M. Budig Theater, home of the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, the problem was the reverse. The intimate theater was shoehorned into an existing space up against an adjacent building, so logistics were tight. But that didn’t mean the roof system couldn’t be striking. Designed by GBBN Architects in Cincinnati, the building’s exterior features daring angles and multi-colored metal roof and wall panels that combine to help capture the spirit of the Shakespearean theater.

Matt Gennett, senior project manager and vice president of Tecta America Zero Company in Cincinnati, oversaw the roofing portion of the new construction project in the Over the Rhine section of Cincinnati on the corner of Elm Street and 12th Street. “This building was plugged in downtown, and they fit everything in real tight,” he says.

Approximately 5,400 square feet of PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch, 24-gauge Corrugated Panels from Petersen Aluminum Corp. were installed on the metal roofs and walls. Tecta America Zero Company installed the metal roof systems, as well as a TPO roof manufactured by Carlisle SynTec over the main structure and mechanical well. Work began in January of 2017 and the roofing portion of the project was wrapped up in late August.

The Metal Roof System

The building features two different metal roof systems. The roof on the Elm Street side is comprised of three intersecting triangle-shaped sections in two colors, Champagne Metallic and Custom Metallic Bronze. “There were several unique angles on the roof,” Gennett explains. “On the top, there was a second metal roof, a shed roof that went down to the 12th Street side.”

The theater’s roof and walls feature approximately 5,400 square feet of PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch Corrugated Panels from Petersen Aluminum Corp. in two colors. The wall panels are perforated. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

The metal roof systems were installed over a 2-inch layer of polyisocyanurate insulation and a 2-1/2-inch nail base from Hunter Panels, H-Shield NB. The nail base is a composite panel with a closed-cell polyisocyanurate foam core, a fiber-reinforced facer on one side and, in this case, 7⁄16-inch oriented strand board (OSB) on the other. The nail base was topped with Carlisle WIP 300 HT waterproofing underlayment to dry in the roof.

Crews also installed two rows of snow guards on the metal roof using the S-5! CorruBracket. “The snow guard was a little different,” Gennett says. “It was specifically designed for a corrugated roof.”

The TPO Roof System

The main roof and mechanical well were covered with the TPO roof system, which totaled approximately 8,300 square feet. After Carlisle VapAir Seal725 TR self-adhering air and vapor barrier was applied to the metal deck, crews installed two layers of 2-inch iso. Tapered insulation was applied over the top to ensure proper drainage. The insulation was covered with a 1/2-inch sheetrock and the 60-mil TPO was fully adhered.

Two large smoke hatches manufactured by Bilco were installed over the stage area. The ACDSH smoke hatches measured 66 inches by 144 inches, and are designed for theaters, concert halls and other interior applications that require limiting noise intrusion.

The Installation

The initial focus was to get the roof dried in so work could progress inside the building. The jobsite conditions posed a few challenges. The structure abutted an existing building, and the space was tight. The schedule necessitated multiple trips to the site, which can be a budget-buster on a small project. “We had a lot of trips in and out to accommodate the schedule and get everything dried in so they could meet the interior schedule,” notes Gennett. “We were sort of on call. We made three or four trips out to roof this small project, so it took a lot of coordination because it was completed in pieces.”

Crews tackled the TPO roof sections first. The mechanical well section provided several challenges. Changes in the mechanical well layout necessitated moving some curbs and making adjustments to the tapered insulation. “They were trying to get lot of equipment into a small space,” Gennett explains. “We had to make sure we could get the water to the low spots and route it around all of that equipment. That was probably the biggest challenge on the project.”

Staging material was also problematic, as traffic was heavy and parking space was at a premium. Material was loaded by a crane, which had to be set up in the street. “It’s a postage stamp of a site,” says Gennett. “This is a main thoroughfare, and there is a school right across the street. We had to work around school hours, and we couldn’t be working when the busses were coming in. We usually came in after school started, around 8 a.m., to load materials.”

When it came time to load the metal panels, the cramped jobsite actually paid off. “It was very convenient,” Gennett recalls. “We were able to load the panels onto the adjacent roof and just hand them over. We had a nice staging area for cutting, so all in all it wasn’t bad.”

The corrugated panels were installed with matching edge metal. “It’s not a complicated panel to install, and they look really nice,” Gennett notes. “On the Elm Street side, to the right of the valley was one color, and to the left was another, so we had to match the color with our coping. There were some interesting transitions with our metal. We also had to really pay attention to how the siding was being installed so we could match the metal to the siding and follow the transitions from color to color.”

The perforated wall panels were installed by ProCLAD Inc. of Noblesville, Indiana. “Once the walls were done, we came in and did the transition metal,” Gennett says. “We just had to make sure everything lined up perfectly.”

Planning Ahead

Ensuring a safe jobsite was the top priority for Tecta America Zero and Messer Construction, the general contractor on the project. “Both Messer Construction and Tecta America take safety very seriously. That’s why we’re good partners,” Gennett says. “We had PPE, high-visibility clothing, hard hats, safety glasses for the whole project. All of the guys were required to have their OSHA 10. Anyone outside of the safety barriers had to be tied off 100 percent of the time.”

Planning ahead was the key to establishing the safety plan and meeting the schedule while ensuring a top-quality installation. “This job had a lot of in and out, which is tough in the roofing business,” Gennett says. “But we planned ahead, we made sure everything was ready for us when we mobilized, and we did a good job of coordinating with the other trades. It took a lot of meetings and discussions — just good project management.”

Gennett credits the successful installation to a great team effort between everyone involved, including the general contractor, the subcontractors, and the manufacturers. “We pride ourselves on our great, skilled crews and our great field project management,” he says. “Our superintendents are there every day checking the work and making sure the guys have everything they need. Messer Construction is great to work with, and obviously having the manufacturer involved the project and doing their inspections as well helps ensure the quality meets everyone’s standards and holds the warranty.”

The theater is now another exciting venue in the Over the Rhine neighborhood. “It is really cool spot,” Gennett says. “It’s an up-and-coming neighborhood that’s grown in leaps and bounds in the last seven years. There is a ton going on in Cincinnati. It’s just another part of the city that makes it really fun to go downtown.”

TEAM

Architect: GBBN Architects, Cincinnati, Ohio, www.gbbn.com
General Contractor: Messer Construction, Cincinnati, Ohio, www.messer.com
Roofing Contractor: Tecta America Zero Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, www.tectaamerica.com
Wall Panel Installer: ProCLAD Inc., Noblesville, Indiana, www.procladinc.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof:
Roof Panels: PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch Corrugated Panels, Petersen Aluminum Corp., www.pac-clad.com
Wall Panels: PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch Corrugated Panels, Petersen Aluminum Corp.
Nail Base: H-Shield NB, Hunter Panels, www.HunterPanels.com
Snow Guards: CorruBracket, S-5!, www.S-5.com
Waterproofing Underlayment: Carlisle WIP 300 HT, Carlisle SynTec, www.CarlisleSyntec.com

TPO Roof:
Membrane: 60-mil grey TPO, Carlisle SynTec
Waterproofing Underlayment: Carlisle WIP 300 HT, Carlisle SynTec
Smoke Hatches: ACDSH Acoustical Smoke Hatch, The Bilco Co., www.Bilco.com