Polyglass USA Celebrates 25 Years of Roofing, Waterproofing Materials Production

Polyglass USA Inc. is celebrating 25 years of producing roofing and waterproofing materials for the North American roofing industry. Polyglass will commemorate this milestone with its customers throughout 2017.

Polyglass is a manufacturer of modified bitumen roof membranes, elastomeric roof coatings and underlayments. Founded in the early 1950s by roofing contractors in northern Italy, Polyglass established its first manufacturing plant in the 1960s serving roofing contractors across Europe. The company grew and expanded operations into the U.S. in 1992 with its first location in Fernley, Nev. By 2006, Polyglass had grown to three US facilities with the addition of plants in Pennsylvania and Florida.

In 2008, Polyglass was acquired by Mapei, a global manufacturer of adhesives, sealants and construction materials for the building industry. Since the acquistion, Polyglass has added a manufacturing location in Arizona, with an additional facility in Texas slated to be operational at the end of 2017. The Polyglass manufacturing facilities are ISO 9001:2008 certified and strategically located to serve its customers.

“Celebrating 25 years of successfully developing and producing roofing solutions that has helped transform the roofing industry would not be possible without our committed employees,” says CEO Natalino Zanchetta. “With a focus on quality, Polyglass has developed solutions for use in every climate and we continue to innovate to meet the changing needs of our customers.”

Since developing its first compound formula decades ago, Polyglass has added hundreds of products that extend the roof-life cycle, help manage building energy loads and enhance building aesthetics. With the launch of patented ADESO Technology, Polyglass provided a way to install modified bitumen membranes. Polyglass also developed patented CURE Technology, a thin film technology applied to membranes during the manufacturing process to increase reflectivity, durability, stain and UV resistance, granule retention and energy efficiency.

As part of its commitment to customers, Polyglass offers continuing education through Polyschool, a two-day training program that teaches best practices in the installation of Polyglass’ commercial and residential products. Polyglass has also developed a customer loyalty program with its Q Rewards program – rewarding its customers for their Polyglass product purchases.

RICOWI to Host Underlayment Seminar on March 17

The underlayment systems play a vital role in today’s roof designs for long-term performance. The challenges of selecting the right materials, application techniques and performance criteria can be challenging to the roofing professional. RICOWI‘s Spring Seminar, which will be held March 17, 2017, in Anaheim, Calif., will provide an in-depth look at the two styles of underlayments—organic and synthetic—that might be used in low- and steep-slope roof designs. This seminar will touch upon the product designs, product approvals and code language that address how to select and properly use these various underlayment products in roof system applications.

Underlayment Speakers
Organic Underlayment: Doug Thagard, Fontana Paper Mills
Synthetic Underlayment: Mark Strait, Synthetic Roof Underlayment Institute

When underlayments are installed as part of a roof system, they may have special requirements for how they are designed, selected and installed to meet the anticipated roof performance. To better understand the relationship of the components, the speakers will cover the various styles of roof applications that will help inform the audience of best practices from the various industry associations.

Association Speakers
Low-slope Underlayment Applications: Mike Ennis, SPRI
Steep-slope Underlayment Applications:

For more information, visit RICOWI’s website or contact Joan Cook, executive director, at (330) 671-4569.

Synthetic Roof Underlayment Institute Is Represented at IBS Show

Synthetic Roof Underlayment Institute (SRUI) had a strong presence at the recent International Builders’ Show. SRUI member companies displayed synthetic underlayments to the over 80,000 IBS attendees. Several board members participated in the show by meeting with potential new SRUI members, answering questions and offering details on the benefits of SRUI membership.

Interest in SRUI continues to grow as the organization builds its influence throughout the underlayment industry.

“I am encouraged by the response and level of interest in the organization,” says SRUI Membership Chair, Bruce Hayden. “As we have expanded our engagement in the standards development process and our outreach to associations representing the various roof cladding materials, people are recognizing SRUI’s influence. That is creating more interest in the organization.”

The overall foot traffic at the show was solid with many companies giving positive reviews on the quality and number of leads.

SRUI members are looking forward to the International Roofing Expo in Las Vegas, NV, March 1-3, 2017. Several member companies will be displaying synthetic roof underlayments as well as meeting with new member candidates to further education and growth of synthetic roofing.

Project Profiles: Hospitality & Entertainment

B.O.B., Grand Rapids, Mich.

Roof Materials

The double-sided green wall surrounds guests with nature and provides fresh ingredients for the food they enjoy.

The double-sided green wall surrounds guests with nature and provides fresh ingredients for the food they enjoy.

The B.O.B.’s 900-square-foot Sky Patio was completed in August 2015 when its signature green wall was installed. The distinctive double-sided green wall surrounds guests with nature and provides fresh ingredients for the food they enjoy.

“Our living wall on the Sky Patio is a vivid symbol of our commitment to sustainability and support of the local environments where our restaurants are located,” says Alice Jasper, director of sustainability, the Gilmore Collection. “It greens up the exterior and interior of the rooftop patio, contributing to the beautification of downtown, making the patio more inviting from the street below and enhancing the dining experience of our guests.”

The two-sided green wall totals 608 square feet. Three exterior sections (48 inches in height) are attached to the outside of the fencing that surrounds the patio. Facing out to the street, these sections frame the Sky Patio on three sides with flowering annuals and perennials. There are five interior sections (45 1/2 inches in height), three on the inside of the perimeter fence, two on the back wall of the building. In addition to flowers, the interior sections include vegetables and herbs used in the kitchen.

The two-sided green wall totals 608 square feet.

The two-sided green wall totals 608 square feet.

“Local sourcing of ingredients is one of our main sustainable hospitality practices,” says Barbie Smith, the Gilmore Collection’s gardener. “With the green wall at the B.O.B., we grow ingredients right near the tables where our guests dine. You cannot get more local than that.”

“What chef wouldn’t want a garden with fresh herbs and produce right in their restaurant? A green wall makes it practical,” adds Mick Rickerd, chef at Bobarino’s. “We utilize the herbs in all our everyday dishes and the vegetables, like Swiss chard and rainbow carrots, in daily features. Our mixology team incorporates fresh basil, mint, lemongrass and thyme into special summer cocktails.”

Green Wall Manufacturer: LiveWall

Roof Report

The B.O.B. is the Gilmore Collection’s most ambitious project, and it exemplifies the company’s commitment to sustainability. The B.O.B. is an acronym for Big Old Building; the 70,000-square-foot, 4-story, red brick building was constructed in 1903 as a grocery warehouse. It stood vacant for decades before the Gilmore Collection saved it from demolition and began its transformation into a landmark hospitality destination in downtown Grand Rapids. The B.O.B. offers multiple venues, including bars, restaurants, comedy and nightclubs, as well as the rooftop Sky Patio, which is accessible through Bobarino’s restaurant on the second floor.

Photos: LiveWall

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Customize Underlayment with Your Company Logo

The Synthetic Guard Plus Underlayment can be customized with a contractor’s company logo and phone number.

The Synthetic Guard Plus Underlayment can be customized with a contractor’s company logo and phone number.

TAMKO Building Products Inc. has made available Synthetic Guard Plus Underlayment, which can be used underneath metal roofing, mechanically fastened tile, wood shake, asphalt, slate and composite roofing. Made of plastic fibers, spun-bonded to make non-woven mat, the underlayment is printed with lay lines and cap nail locations for easy installation. It also has cap nail locations for high-wind and Florida applications. The underlayment can be customized with a contractor’s company logo and phone number.

Synthetic Underlayment Can Be Used on Nearly Any Roof

Based on contractor demand, Berry Plastics Co., the makers of the TYPAR Weather Protection System, launched Surround VR Underlayment, a synthetic roofing underlayment.

Based on contractor demand, the makers of the TYPAR Weather Protection System launched a synthetic underlayment named Surround VR.

Based on contractor demand, Berry Plastics Co., the makers of the TYPAR Weather Protection System, launched Surround VR Underlayment, a synthetic roofing underlayment.

Designed with the installer in mind, Surround VR Underlayment reduces the amount and weight of material needed for roofing jobs. In fact, one roll of Surround VR covers the same area as five rolls of 30# felt, yet weighs seven times less and is 10 times stronger.

The waterproof product was developed to work in nearly any roofing application, including with shingles, shakes, tile, slate or metal roofs. “With our new Surround VR Underlayment, installers will make fewer and easier trips up and down the ladder while experiencing faster installs, all while providing a more durable roofing system to their customers,” says Jorge Martinez, senior director of Product Marketing, TYPAR brand.

Made from a waterproof, synthetic polymer material, Surround VRUnderlayment is engineered to repel moisture and will not warp or buckle when wet, thus helping to maximize the life of the roof system. Surround VR is also slip-resistant on dry surfaces and provides better traction when wet.

The underlayment maintains its integrity year-round, performing well in temperatures ranging from -40 to 240 F. In cold temperatures, the material will not crack or wrinkle, which helps ensure smooth installs. In warm temperatures, its heat-reflecting, gray-colored surface reduces heat buildup on the roof. Surround VR also can withstand up to six months’ exposure to UV light and high winds and storms, even those experienced by coastal regions.

Surround VR Underlayment is backed by a 15-year product replacement warranty and is suited for residential and commercial applications.

Learn More

Visit Typar.com
Call (800) 284-2780

Historic Home Gets a Refresh with a Striking New Copper Roof

Anyone who spends time in Connecticut finds themselves in a place with deep historical roots that stretch back to colonial times. It is an inherent part of the charm of the state and something in which residents take great pride.

Along with delivering the performance desired by the homeowners, the copper roof maintains the traditional look and feel of the house.

Along with delivering the performance desired by the homeowners, the copper roof maintains the traditional look and feel of the house.

There is a real, tangible window to this rich historical tradition in many of the historic homes and buildings all across the state. Great care has been taken to preserve the look and operation of many historic structures and to integrate them into the architectural fabric of communities all around Connecticut.

Like many places and institutions in the state, Litchfield County has a history that goes back to pre-Revolutionary days. Established as a county in 1719, Litchfield County was home to Harriett Beecher Stowe and was also where Sarah Pierce established in 1792 the Litchfield Female Academy, one of the first major educational institutions for women and girls in the U.S.

Today, Litchfield County has 166 properties and districts listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Staying true to the architectural heritage of the state is very important to the people who live there. However, just because a home or building looks like it did a few hundred years ago doesn’t mean it has to operate that way, too. Many owners of historic homes want to bring the function of their houses into modern times while still keeping the look and feel of the past.

This was the case for homeowners in Litchfield County who wanted to make some modern improvements while still preserving the traditional look and feel of their home in Sharon, Conn. For this work, the homeowners turned to the professionals at Anderson Enterprises, a general contracting building and renovation firm in Sharon. The project started with modest goals in mind but quickly grew.

“We were initially hired to replace four oak floors,” recalls Ellen Burcroff with Anderson Enterprises. “That was then extended to changing the mouldings, re-plastering, painting, renovating the third floor and master bedroom, as well as rebuilding the chimney and replacing the roof.”

Anderson Enterprises won the job after an interview. “Our goal was to get the homeowners into a more pleasing interior,” Burcroff says.

The entire home features a brass snow-retention system. PHOTO: MetalPlus LLC

The entire home features a brass snow-retention system. PHOTO: MetalPlus LLC

As part of the interior overhaul, the project included providing the home with proper ventilation and insulation. Along with delivering the performance desired by the homeowners, maintaining the traditional look and feel of the house was extremely important. Performing this kind of retrofit on a historic home without damaging the exterior often means going in through the roof, which was what was decided upon for this project. Removing the old wood shake roof meant installing a new one. The contractor believed this was a perfect time for a change.

“The customers wanted a historically authentic look,” Burcroff explains. “We strongly recommended not using wood shingles again. Ultimately, we all decided on using copper for the new roof.”

A copper roof was a perfect solution for this project for many reasons. On a performance level, the homeowners were interested in the durability and energy efficiency of copper. Aesthetically, copper delivers a striking curb appeal that is still in keeping with the historic nature of the home. And its natural patina will only enhance the look of the home over time.

GETTING IT DONE

With the appropriate decisions made, Anderson Enterprises’ team started work on the home. The wood shakes and wood lath were removed, exposing the rafters underneath. Fiberglass insulation was installed with about a 2-inch space left above the rafters for airflow.

PHOTOS: VLC IMAGES MOBILE STUDIO, COURTESY MARIO LALLIER, unless otherwise noted

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An Oceanfront Elementary School Poses Tough Problems, but a Coated Aluminum Standing-seam Roof Passes the Test

Elementary school students sometimes find themselves staring out the window, but few have a view to rival that of the students at Sullivan’s Island Elementary School in Sullivan’s Island, S.C. The school is located on oceanfront property, and when it was time for the original building to be rebuilt, the site posed numerous challenges.

The standing-seam roof is made up of 0.040-inch coated aluminum panels that are 18-inches wide.

The standing-seam roof is made up of 0.040-inch coated aluminum panels that are 18-inches wide.

The original school had been built in the 1950s. It had been designed for 350 students and built on grade. The new school would have to be elevated to conform to modern building codes and service 500 students. The structure would not only have to withstand high winds, severe weather and a salt-air environment, but it also would have to fit into its surroundings. Many residents feared the larger building would look out of place in the cozy beach community. It was architect Jerry English’s job to figure out a way to make it work.

English is a principal at Cummings & McCrady Architects, Charleston, S.C., the architect of record on the project. He worked with a talented team of construction professionals, including Ricky Simmons, general manager of Keating Roofing & Sheet Metal Co. Inc. in Charleston, to refine his vision and bring it to life. English and Simmons shared their insight on the project, and they both point to the building’s metal roof as a key element in the project’s success.

CHALLENGING DESIGN

Cummings & McCrady Architects handles a broad range of commercial, institutional, religious and historic work—new construction and renovation. The firm had done a lot of work with the Charleston County School District over the years, including a small library addition for the original Sullivan’s Island Elementary School after Hurricane Hugo passed through in 1989, and it was awarded the new construction project.

The building’s foundation system had to meet strict regulations regarding resistance to storm surge. The building is elevated on concrete piers, which were topped with a 6-inch reinforced concrete slab. Metal framing was constructed above the slab. “With our building, we had to raise the underside of the structure almost 7 feet above the grade,” English recalls. “What we did is we built it a little bit higher than that so the underside could be left open and used for playground.”

For English, coming up with a design that would reflect the character of the local community was the biggest challenge. To achieve that goal, he broke up the building into four sections and spread them across the site with the tallest sections in the center. “We have four linked segments that transition down on each end to the height of the adjacent residences,” he says.

The roof was also designed to blend in with the neighboring homes, many of which feature metal roofs. “The idea of pitched roofs with overhangs became a strong unifying element,” English explains.

English checked with several major metal roofing manufacturers to determine which products could withstand the harsh oceanfront environment and wind-uplift requirements. “Virtually every one of them would only warranty aluminum roofing,” he says. “The wind requirement and the resistance to the salt air were what drove us to a coated aluminum roof.”

The majority of the panels were factory-made, but the manufacturer supplied the rollforming machine and the operator to handle the onsite rollforming of the largest panels.

The majority of the panels were factory-made, but Petersen Aluminum supplied the rollforming machine and the operator to handle the onsite rollforming of the largest panels.

The standing-seam roof is made up of 0.040-inch coated aluminum panels that are 18-inches wide. Metal trusses give the roof system its shape. English tapped the resources of roof consultant ADC in Charleston and the metal roofing manufacturer to iron out all the details. English wanted to avoid any cross seams in the metal roofing, so he worked with Dave Landis, the manufacturer’s architectural/technical sales manager, to arrange for the longest panels to be formed onsite.

The roof also includes two decks that serve as outdoor teaching areas. These sections were covered with a two-ply modified bitumen roof system and protected with a multi-colored elevated concrete paver system.

Another standout feature is the school’s entry tower, which is topped by a freestanding hip roof featuring curved panels. This roof was constructed with panels that were 12-inches wide. “We found other examples on the island where the base of the roof flares a little bit as a traditional element, and with the closer seamed panels they were able to get those curves,” English says. “It’s a refinement that’s a little different than the rest of the roof, but it’s the proper scale and the fine detailing pulls it together and sets if off from the main roof forms that are behind it.”

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

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Atlas Roofing’s Roadshow Aims to Strengthen Business Skills

Atlas Roofing is on the road, connecting with contractors in six major markets across the country to help them strengthen business skills.

“We want to help contractors stand out in a crowded market and close more jobs,” Stan Bastek, director of marketing and sales development/shingles and underlayment division, said of the 2016 Roadshow. “We’ve got some differentiating products, some marketing programs and ideas. Most of those ideas came from doing events like this and talking to roofing contractors and listening to what we can do to help their businesses.”

In this year’s sessions, participants can discover:
• How to become a 3M Scotchgard Specialist.
• How HP Shingle Technology saves time and money.
• How Atlas shingles compare to other brands.
• How Atlas Class 4 Impact Resistant Shingles and premium underlayment can benefit any application.
• How Atlas shingles featuring Scotchgard Protector can help land more jobs.
• 10 tips to boost your social impact.

Residential contractors can learn about the latest in shingle and roofing system innovations from Atlas. Rounding out the event are FREE professional headshots and a game show that encourages everyone to get involved – plus great giveaways and roadshow-themed prizes.

Atlas Roadshows are half-day sessions open to contractors, their employees and distributors. Admission is free, but registration is required.

Malarkey Roofing Products Expands #KnowYourRoof Education Series

Malarkey Roofing Products continues to expand its website and social media channels #KnowYourRoof video library to educate customers. Ten educational videos were introduced in the first quarter of 2016 with additional videos being released later this year.

The videos are part of the #KnowYourRoof education series from Malarkey that can be found on their website and social media channels. Recent video topics include the importance of roofing granules, polymer modified asphalt, solar reflective roofing, underlayment, multi-ply built-up roofing, and available product lines. The educational videos range from approximately one to three minutes in length and can be accessed through low slope education and steep slope education video playlists on the Malarkey Roofing Products YouTube channel.