Customize Underlayment with Your Company Logo

The Synthetic Guard Plus Underlayment can be customized with a contractor’s company logo and phone number.

The Synthetic Guard Plus Underlayment can be customized with a contractor’s company logo and phone number.

TAMKO Building Products Inc. has made available Synthetic Guard Plus Underlayment, which can be used underneath metal roofing, mechanically fastened tile, wood shake, asphalt, slate and composite roofing. Made of plastic fibers, spun-bonded to make non-woven mat, the underlayment is printed with lay lines and cap nail locations for easy installation. It also has cap nail locations for high-wind and Florida applications. The underlayment can be customized with a contractor’s company logo and phone number.

Synthetic Underlayment Can Be Used on Nearly Any Roof

Based on contractor demand, Berry Plastics Co., the makers of the TYPAR Weather Protection System, launched Surround VR Underlayment, a synthetic roofing underlayment.

Based on contractor demand, the makers of the TYPAR Weather Protection System launched a synthetic underlayment named Surround VR.

Based on contractor demand, Berry Plastics Co., the makers of the TYPAR Weather Protection System, launched Surround VR Underlayment, a synthetic roofing underlayment.

Designed with the installer in mind, Surround VR Underlayment reduces the amount and weight of material needed for roofing jobs. In fact, one roll of Surround VR covers the same area as five rolls of 30# felt, yet weighs seven times less and is 10 times stronger.

The waterproof product was developed to work in nearly any roofing application, including with shingles, shakes, tile, slate or metal roofs. “With our new Surround VR Underlayment, installers will make fewer and easier trips up and down the ladder while experiencing faster installs, all while providing a more durable roofing system to their customers,” says Jorge Martinez, senior director of Product Marketing, TYPAR brand.

Made from a waterproof, synthetic polymer material, Surround VRUnderlayment is engineered to repel moisture and will not warp or buckle when wet, thus helping to maximize the life of the roof system. Surround VR is also slip-resistant on dry surfaces and provides better traction when wet.

The underlayment maintains its integrity year-round, performing well in temperatures ranging from -40 to 240 F. In cold temperatures, the material will not crack or wrinkle, which helps ensure smooth installs. In warm temperatures, its heat-reflecting, gray-colored surface reduces heat buildup on the roof. Surround VR also can withstand up to six months’ exposure to UV light and high winds and storms, even those experienced by coastal regions.

Surround VR Underlayment is backed by a 15-year product replacement warranty and is suited for residential and commercial applications.

Learn More

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Call (800) 284-2780

Historic Home Gets a Refresh with a Striking New Copper Roof

Anyone who spends time in Connecticut finds themselves in a place with deep historical roots that stretch back to colonial times. It is an inherent part of the charm of the state and something in which residents take great pride.

Along with delivering the performance desired by the homeowners, the copper roof maintains the traditional look and feel of the house.

Along with delivering the performance desired by the homeowners, the copper roof maintains the traditional look and feel of the house.

There is a real, tangible window to this rich historical tradition in many of the historic homes and buildings all across the state. Great care has been taken to preserve the look and operation of many historic structures and to integrate them into the architectural fabric of communities all around Connecticut.

Like many places and institutions in the state, Litchfield County has a history that goes back to pre-Revolutionary days. Established as a county in 1719, Litchfield County was home to Harriett Beecher Stowe and was also where Sarah Pierce established in 1792 the Litchfield Female Academy, one of the first major educational institutions for women and girls in the U.S.

Today, Litchfield County has 166 properties and districts listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Staying true to the architectural heritage of the state is very important to the people who live there. However, just because a home or building looks like it did a few hundred years ago doesn’t mean it has to operate that way, too. Many owners of historic homes want to bring the function of their houses into modern times while still keeping the look and feel of the past.

This was the case for homeowners in Litchfield County who wanted to make some modern improvements while still preserving the traditional look and feel of their home in Sharon, Conn. For this work, the homeowners turned to the professionals at Anderson Enterprises, a general contracting building and renovation firm in Sharon. The project started with modest goals in mind but quickly grew.

“We were initially hired to replace four oak floors,” recalls Ellen Burcroff with Anderson Enterprises. “That was then extended to changing the mouldings, re-plastering, painting, renovating the third floor and master bedroom, as well as rebuilding the chimney and replacing the roof.”

Anderson Enterprises won the job after an interview. “Our goal was to get the homeowners into a more pleasing interior,” Burcroff says.

The entire home features a brass snow-retention system. PHOTO: MetalPlus LLC

The entire home features a brass snow-retention system. PHOTO: MetalPlus LLC

As part of the interior overhaul, the project included providing the home with proper ventilation and insulation. Along with delivering the performance desired by the homeowners, maintaining the traditional look and feel of the house was extremely important. Performing this kind of retrofit on a historic home without damaging the exterior often means going in through the roof, which was what was decided upon for this project. Removing the old wood shake roof meant installing a new one. The contractor believed this was a perfect time for a change.

“The customers wanted a historically authentic look,” Burcroff explains. “We strongly recommended not using wood shingles again. Ultimately, we all decided on using copper for the new roof.”

A copper roof was a perfect solution for this project for many reasons. On a performance level, the homeowners were interested in the durability and energy efficiency of copper. Aesthetically, copper delivers a striking curb appeal that is still in keeping with the historic nature of the home. And its natural patina will only enhance the look of the home over time.

GETTING IT DONE

With the appropriate decisions made, Anderson Enterprises’ team started work on the home. The wood shakes and wood lath were removed, exposing the rafters underneath. Fiberglass insulation was installed with about a 2-inch space left above the rafters for airflow.

PHOTOS: VLC IMAGES MOBILE STUDIO, COURTESY MARIO LALLIER, unless otherwise noted

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An Oceanfront Elementary School Poses Tough Problems, but a Coated Aluminum Standing-seam Roof Passes the Test

Elementary school students sometimes find themselves staring out the window, but few have a view to rival that of the students at Sullivan’s Island Elementary School in Sullivan’s Island, S.C. The school is located on oceanfront property, and when it was time for the original building to be rebuilt, the site posed numerous challenges.

The standing-seam roof is made up of 0.040-inch coated aluminum panels that are 18-inches wide.

The standing-seam roof is made up of 0.040-inch coated aluminum panels that are 18-inches wide.

The original school had been built in the 1950s. It had been designed for 350 students and built on grade. The new school would have to be elevated to conform to modern building codes and service 500 students. The structure would not only have to withstand high winds, severe weather and a salt-air environment, but it also would have to fit into its surroundings. Many residents feared the larger building would look out of place in the cozy beach community. It was architect Jerry English’s job to figure out a way to make it work.

English is a principal at Cummings & McCrady Architects, Charleston, S.C., the architect of record on the project. He worked with a talented team of construction professionals, including Ricky Simmons, general manager of Keating Roofing & Sheet Metal Co. Inc. in Charleston, to refine his vision and bring it to life. English and Simmons shared their insight on the project, and they both point to the building’s metal roof as a key element in the project’s success.

CHALLENGING DESIGN

Cummings & McCrady Architects handles a broad range of commercial, institutional, religious and historic work—new construction and renovation. The firm had done a lot of work with the Charleston County School District over the years, including a small library addition for the original Sullivan’s Island Elementary School after Hurricane Hugo passed through in 1989, and it was awarded the new construction project.

The building’s foundation system had to meet strict regulations regarding resistance to storm surge. The building is elevated on concrete piers, which were topped with a 6-inch reinforced concrete slab. Metal framing was constructed above the slab. “With our building, we had to raise the underside of the structure almost 7 feet above the grade,” English recalls. “What we did is we built it a little bit higher than that so the underside could be left open and used for playground.”

For English, coming up with a design that would reflect the character of the local community was the biggest challenge. To achieve that goal, he broke up the building into four sections and spread them across the site with the tallest sections in the center. “We have four linked segments that transition down on each end to the height of the adjacent residences,” he says.

The roof was also designed to blend in with the neighboring homes, many of which feature metal roofs. “The idea of pitched roofs with overhangs became a strong unifying element,” English explains.

English checked with several major metal roofing manufacturers to determine which products could withstand the harsh oceanfront environment and wind-uplift requirements. “Virtually every one of them would only warranty aluminum roofing,” he says. “The wind requirement and the resistance to the salt air were what drove us to a coated aluminum roof.”

The majority of the panels were factory-made, but the manufacturer supplied the rollforming machine and the operator to handle the onsite rollforming of the largest panels.

The majority of the panels were factory-made, but Petersen Aluminum supplied the rollforming machine and the operator to handle the onsite rollforming of the largest panels.

The standing-seam roof is made up of 0.040-inch coated aluminum panels that are 18-inches wide. Metal trusses give the roof system its shape. English tapped the resources of roof consultant ADC in Charleston and the metal roofing manufacturer to iron out all the details. English wanted to avoid any cross seams in the metal roofing, so he worked with Dave Landis, the manufacturer’s architectural/technical sales manager, to arrange for the longest panels to be formed onsite.

The roof also includes two decks that serve as outdoor teaching areas. These sections were covered with a two-ply modified bitumen roof system and protected with a multi-colored elevated concrete paver system.

Another standout feature is the school’s entry tower, which is topped by a freestanding hip roof featuring curved panels. This roof was constructed with panels that were 12-inches wide. “We found other examples on the island where the base of the roof flares a little bit as a traditional element, and with the closer seamed panels they were able to get those curves,” English says. “It’s a refinement that’s a little different than the rest of the roof, but it’s the proper scale and the fine detailing pulls it together and sets if off from the main roof forms that are behind it.”

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

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Atlas Roofing’s Roadshow Aims to Strengthen Business Skills

Atlas Roofing is on the road, connecting with contractors in six major markets across the country to help them strengthen business skills.

“We want to help contractors stand out in a crowded market and close more jobs,” Stan Bastek, director of marketing and sales development/shingles and underlayment division, said of the 2016 Roadshow. “We’ve got some differentiating products, some marketing programs and ideas. Most of those ideas came from doing events like this and talking to roofing contractors and listening to what we can do to help their businesses.”

In this year’s sessions, participants can discover:
• How to become a 3M Scotchgard Specialist.
• How HP Shingle Technology saves time and money.
• How Atlas shingles compare to other brands.
• How Atlas Class 4 Impact Resistant Shingles and premium underlayment can benefit any application.
• How Atlas shingles featuring Scotchgard Protector can help land more jobs.
• 10 tips to boost your social impact.

Residential contractors can learn about the latest in shingle and roofing system innovations from Atlas. Rounding out the event are FREE professional headshots and a game show that encourages everyone to get involved – plus great giveaways and roadshow-themed prizes.

Atlas Roadshows are half-day sessions open to contractors, their employees and distributors. Admission is free, but registration is required.

Malarkey Roofing Products Expands #KnowYourRoof Education Series

Malarkey Roofing Products continues to expand its website and social media channels #KnowYourRoof video library to educate customers. Ten educational videos were introduced in the first quarter of 2016 with additional videos being released later this year.

The videos are part of the #KnowYourRoof education series from Malarkey that can be found on their website and social media channels. Recent video topics include the importance of roofing granules, polymer modified asphalt, solar reflective roofing, underlayment, multi-ply built-up roofing, and available product lines. The educational videos range from approximately one to three minutes in length and can be accessed through low slope education and steep slope education video playlists on the Malarkey Roofing Products YouTube channel.

Synthetic Underlayment Is Approved for New and Reroofing Applications

Summit 180 synthetic underlayment by Atlas Roofing offers many advanced benefits not available with conventional felt.

Summit 180 synthetic underlayment by Atlas Roofing offers many advanced benefits not available with conventional felt.

Roof underlayment is the last line of defense that protects a home from serious damage if a roof covering is blown off or damaged in a storm. Summit 180 synthetic underlayment by Atlas Roofing offers many advanced benefits not available with conventional felt. It is an approved underlayment for new and reroofing applications and can be used with most types of code-approved steep-slope roof coverings, including metal.

On certain roof projects, underlayment may face a long exposure time from the dry-in to the completed roof covering. Atlas developed Summit 180 with performance characteristics that ensure its reliability during extended uncovered exposure to damaging UV rays. This lightweight, extremely strong, polypropylene fabric contains UV and water-resistant coatings that allow for up to 180 days of open exposure before being covered.

Summit 180 can withstand extreme temperatures from -40 F to 240 F. Unlike conventional saturated felt, Summit 180 is not prone to wrinkling or buckling. This allows it to lie more flat, which helps a roof protect against invasion from water.

Roofing crews benefit from a textured, wrinkle-free top surface and a slip-resistant coating applied to the face and base surfaces of this underlayment. This dial coating slip resistance provides improved grip to allow safer walkability during installation.

Summit 180 synthetic underlayment exceeds ASTM D226 Type I and Type II, the standard specification for asphalt saturated felt. It has earned ASTM D6757, the inorganic shingle underlayment standard. It is also UL 790 compliant for fire resistance.

Summit 180 roof underlayment is packaged for convenience in 10 square rolls weighing approximately 30 pounds each. For more details on Atlas Roofing’s synthetic underlayment, contact an Atlas sales representative.

CertainTeed Metal Roofing Exceeds Industry Standards

Roof specifiers and installers can now achieve project goals in fire resistance and solar reflectance more easily with CertainTeed Presidio Metal Roofing as a result of testing to the latest editions of industry performance test standards. Introduced last year, the line of steel roofing products blends the look of classic roofing materials with the exceptional wind/hail resistance and solar reflectance of metal roofing.

Specifiers now can achieve Class A fire rating with Presidio applied over a layer of a specific fire-resistant roofing membrane product paired with a single layer of select CertainTeed underlayments – a barrier board is no longer needed. Further, the Presidio metal roofing products now earn a Class B fire rating when applied over a single layer of a variety of CertainTeed roofing underlayments.

In regards to solar reflectance, seven colors from the Presidio roofing product line have recently been listed for solar reflectance and thermal emittance by the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC). Presidio Tile colors English Toffee, Nutmeg, Speckled Bronze and Terra Cotta, and Presidio Shake colors Ash, Sand Dune and Weathered Wood are listed by CRRC with initial solar reflectance values ranging from 0.26 to 0.34.

“Sustainability and providing customers with products that help ensure the safety of homeowners have long been top priorities at CertainTeed,” says Dale Walton, residential products manager for CertainTeed Roofing. “And, the recent ratings from Intertek and the CRRC serve as proof of this commitment. With Presidio, specifiers and contractors will have the peace of mind to install the highest quality energy-efficient, fire- and weather-resistant roof, all while more easily meeting project certification goals.”

Each easy to install Presidio panel has overlaps that conceal the joints and create a seamless appearance. Presidio Tile embodies the same Mediterranean magnetism of traditional clay, but weighs hundreds of pounds less, and at a fraction of the cost. Presidio Shake is pre-weathered, aged and distressed to recreate the look of wood. Lastly, Presidio Slate showcases the natural beauty of stone in a lightweight, fully recyclable, energy-efficient material.

Underlayment Complies with Florida Building Code

MetShield HT underlayment from Drexel Metals was issued a Product Control Notice of Acceptance (NOA No.: 16-0322.26) for use in Miami-Dade County and its municipalities.

MetShield HT underlayment from Drexel Metals was issued a Product Control Notice of Acceptance (NOA No.: 16-0322.26) for use in Miami-Dade County and its municipalities.

MetShield HT underlayment from Drexel Metals was issued a Product Control Notice of Acceptance (NOA No.: 16-0322.26) for use in Miami-Dade County and its municipalities.

MetShield HT has been designed to comply with the Florida Building Code, including the High Velocity Hurricane Zone of the Florida Building Code. MetShield HT meets the requirements of ATSM D1970, for self-adhering polymer modified bituminous sheet materials used as steep slope roofing underlayment for ice dam protection.

Manufacturer Donates Roofing Materials and More to Camp that Assists Veterans Suffering from Brain Trauma

Rick Briggs is in his element. The retired Air Force major has just spent the better part of the afternoon chatting with a steady stream of military veterans and their families, all of whom have come to get a closer look at Camp Liberty, a rehab facility of sorts designed to help wounded soldiers and those suffering from brain trauma.

Camp Liberty, Brooklyn, Mich., is a rehab facility designed to help wounded soldiers and those suffering from brain trauma.

Camp Liberty, Brooklyn, Mich., is a rehab facility designed to help wounded soldiers and those suffering from brain trauma.

Now, he’s enjoying a drive through the property’s northwest end in a Polaris multi-seat ATV. He is away from the crowds. Away from the rumblings of the nearby roads. Away from the jack-hammering of the nearby construction. All that can be heard now is the gurgling of the nearby Raisin River and the wind gently bending the wildflowers in a vast field within the 137-acre complex. Briggs points to a landmark in the distance and begins to tell one of his favorite stories. It’s apparent that he’s told this tale many times in the past year.

Just last year, Briggs recalls, Britani Lafferty, a 29-year-old veteran who spent time in Iraq as a combat medic, visited the Camp Liberty site. Suffering from debilitating physical and mental wounds from her tour, Lafferty tried countless medical treatments to no avail. Desperate for something that might work, Lafferty turned to the healing power of nature. Invited to spend time at Camp Liberty, Lafferty tried her hand at deer hunting. From a blind overlooking the Raisin River, Lafferty bagged her very first buck. And for Camp Liberty, it marked the first successful hunt for their program.

To Briggs, the moment symbolized that Lafferty could overcome her own afflictions, that she was still able to do things without the help of others. This is the sort of therapy Briggs and the Camp Liberty project hope to impart. “I know vets who are really dealing with severe difficulties,” Briggs says. “They don’t want to be around people. They won’t go to a mall. They won’t go to a movie. We have actually gotten them out here and back to where they can get out and start doing stuff.”

And that’s Camp Liberty’s ultimate goal. “When we get out here doing recreation with guys, it gives them the opportunity to listen and realize that PTSD is treatable,” Briggs adds. “These guys don’t want to believe it. They don’t want to think about it. They don’t want to admit they’re dealing with it. ”

The story of Lafferty is just one example of what Briggs thinks could be a new way to tackle the effects of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) to the body and mind. With the construction of a new program facility, scheduled to be completed by the end of the year, the full vision of Briggs and his childhood friend Allan Lutes is within reach.

Lutes and Briggs aim to construct a wilderness recreation facility focused on helping military veterans recover from debilitating injuries, brain trauma, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Frustrated by the lack of attention paid to veterans (just two years ago, Michigan ranked dead last in the U.S. in military spending on vets), the two vowed to make a difference. And after years of planning, preparation and fundraising, the project, which is located just a few miles from the Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, is nearly complete.

From hunting to fishing to kayaking, Camp Liberty offers veterans a quiet, tranquil location where rehabilitation can flourish.

From hunting to fishing to kayaking, Camp Liberty offers veterans a quiet, tranquil location where rehabilitation can flourish.

With the help of volunteer crews, Lutes and Briggs are overseeing one of the last steps of the project, the construction of a 2,880-square-foot, handicapped accessible lodge that has taken shape over the past five months. Upon completion, the three-bedroom, two-bathroom structure will allow injured veterans and their families to lengthen their stay and take advantage of all of the outdoor activities the massive site has to offer—and it won’t cost them a cent.

Amidst this huge habitat stand 10 state-of-the-art hunting blinds and wildlife observation towers, all fully handicapped accessible. Along with guided hunting expeditions, the veterans can fish in the nearby Raisin River, hike along numerous nature trails, and enjoy the serenity of a reflection area and outdoor chapel. From hunting to fishing to kayaking, Camp Liberty offers veterans—particularly those who have suffered injuries in combat or are challenged by traumatic brain injuries or post-traumatic stress disorder—a quiet, tranquil location where rehabilitation can flourish.

“Hunting is just a small part of what we offer here,” Lutes notes. “Every inch of this facility has been thought through as a way of something that is going to make someone feel comfortable, feel at peace, feel part of nature, and be able to reflect on their life.”

An ambitious project like this doesn’t just happen, of course. The financial barriers would be too daunting for most people, even if they were smart enough to come up with such a unique vision. Briggs, Lutes and the Camp Liberty team have raised close to $300,000 toward their building projects and have recruited volunteers to help with completing the site’s projects. The primary contributor, Lutes adds, has been the Eisenhower Center, the country’s leading brain injury facility, which has donated more than $200,000 to the project. Among a bevy of donors, Atlas Roofing Corp. has provided almost $30,000 in building products for the construction of the program facility, including the ThermalStar Radiant Comfort in-floor heat panels that will regulate heating within the complex, ThermalStar LCI-SS insulated structural sheathing, AC Foam Crossvent Insulation roofing product, WeatherMaster Ice and Water Shield, Gorilla Guard EverFelt Underlayment and Pinnacle Pristine Green Shingles.

“I think the right word [to describe his reaction to the financial support] would be overjoyed,” Lutes says. “Overjoyed that other people have bought into our vision, that other people have seen the value and need for helping our veterans and to help people who have mobility issues enjoy the outdoors. I mean, that is really heartwarming.”

Atlas Roofing Corp. has provided almost $30,000 in building products for the construction of the program facility.

Atlas Roofing Corp. has provided almost $30,000 in building products for the construction of the program facility.

To Charlene Zezawa, the project would have been stalled from the outset had it not been for Briggs’ uncanny ability to advocate for the camp’s vision. She was so taken by a presentation by Briggs at a golf fundraiser several years ago, Zezawa signed on to help out. Before she knew it, she was asked to serve on Camp Liberty’s board of directors as its secretary. Briggs’ passion is contagious, she said. “Rick is the best fundraising person I have ever met in my entire life,” Zezawa states. “He will go after it. You have to have heart and Rick has heart. That’s what drives him.”

Zezawa is among a steady stream of volunteers who have lent a hand. Throughout the summer, members of the Jackson County Habitat for Humanity jumped on board to lead the construction of the program facility’s foundation, structure and roof. The crew, ranging in age from 60 to 93, spent the better part of the summer in what crew chief David Behnke called “a wonderful experience”. “If you can’t get behind this project, you can’t get behind anything,” he says.

A.J. Mikulka is a 33-year old Army National Guard veteran who has been hunting since she was a kid, learning how to carry a shotgun from her father. She is not unlike many of the veterans that Lutes and Briggs hope to help. On Aug. 9, 2007, Mikulka, serving in Mosul, Iraq, was in the midst of helping to train Iraqi police when the station started taking enemy fire. When she stepped out from behind a barricade, insurgent forces launched a rocket-propelled grenade. “It was a direct hit. It took my leg clean off,” she recalls. Mikulka now walks with a prosthetic, which is attached to her leg just below the knee.

Her physical recovery didn’t take nearly as long as the emotional recovery, though. Mikulka believes the mental recuperation offered by Camp Liberty will have a “profound effect” on wounded veterans like herself. “There’s always going to be stuff that you deal with [emotionally],” she says. “I know a lot of [injured veterans] who are still dealing with it years later. The hard part for me was [dealing with] the loss of career.”

Lutes and Briggs hope that Camp Liberty will be a place that people like Mikulka can come to heal and feel “normal again.” Research supports their hunch. A 2013 study by the University of Michigan indicated that time spent in nature can improve cognitive abilities, particularly for those who suffer from post-deployment issues. “The research clearly shows that extended outdoor recreation helps combat-injured veterans,” Briggs notes. “And the more severe their injuries, the more significant the outcomes.”

It’s nearly impossible to not come away impressed by what has happened in this remote area in southeastern Michigan. Roger Barnett, a 66-year-old veteran, who was “in the mud” in Vietnam, spent an afternoon with his wife Dottie chatting with other visitors at a recent Camp Liberty open house. “It’s just really great to have for these guys with disabilities,” Barnett states. “It’s all set up for them. It’s all set up for recreation, for them [to have] some kind of an outlet and get together and spend time in front of the fireplace and relax. It’s great. It’s just what they need.”

Now, Briggs and Lutes are just antsy to get the construction completed. While they enjoy bringing attention to Camp Liberty, raising funds and chatting with the press, they’re eager for the property to begin hosting those who need it the most. “We hope to be able to help the veterans realize that they may have a TBI issue or a PTSD issue and that there is a treatment option that can improve it without them sacrificing their jobs, their military rating or their relationships,” Lutes says. “We’ve proven to ourselves that what we do can change lives for the better.”