OMG Roofing Opens Two International Warehouses

To support a goal of accelerating international sales growth in Asia and Europe, OMG Roofing Products has established warehouses in Rotterdam in the Netherlands as well as in Shanghai, China.

The two warehouses are centrally located within their regions to enable OMG to supply products to roofing contractors and OEM partners in each of these markets. Both warehouses will stock a range of products sold locally, including OMG Fasteners and Plates, RhinoBond Tools and Plates, OMG Telescopic Tubes, OlyBond500 insulation adhesives, OlyFlow Drains, and EverSeal Roof Repair Tape.

“OMG Roofing Products has continued to grow and expand beyond U.S. borders,” said Web Shaffer, vice president of marketing. “By adding these warehouses we are building a foundation on which to accelerate our international growth by improving our service and expanding our distribution into new countries throughout Europe and Asia.”

Headquartered in Agawam, Mass., OMG Roofing Products is a global supplier of commercial roofing products including specialty fasteners, insulation adhesives, roof drains, pipe supports, emergency roof repair tape as well as productivity tools such as the RhinoBond Induction Welding System. The company’s focus is delivering products and services that improve contractor productivity and enhance roof system performance.

UL-listed Smoke Vent Skylights Minimize Warehouse’s Power Consumption

Trojan Battery, a manufacturer of deep-cycle batteries, occupies a 160,000-square-foot industrial facility in Santa Fe Springs, Calif., along with several other large industrial buildings in California. Each facility consumes a significant amount of electrical power each month. By adding 100 polycarbonate dome UL-listed smoke vent skylights, Trojan Battery will be able to save upwards of 40 percent on its power consumption for its warehouse in Santa Fe Springs.

By adding 100 polycarbonate dome UL-listed smoke vent skylights, Trojan Battery will be able to save upwards of 40 percent on its power consumption for its warehouse in Santa Fe Springs, Calif.

By adding 100 polycarbonate dome UL-listed smoke vent skylights, Trojan Battery will be able to save upwards of 40 percent on its power consumption for its warehouse in Santa Fe Springs, Calif.

According to a representative of Santa Ana, Calif.-based IRC (Independent Roofing Consultants), a roofing consulting firm: “Typically, a 2 percent density of skylight units are utilized for effective energy reduction. Densities of 2.5 to 3 percent are being provided for newer buildings and being installed in conjunction with roof replacements to reduce energy costs associated with building lighting.”

The roof originally consisted of outdated skylights significantly reducing the benefits of natural lighting. New polycarbonate dome skylights and smoke vents from SKYCO Skylights allow owners to maximize the use of free daylighting. Additional benefits include 10 years against yellowing and breakage.

Aside from the energy benefits, Trojan Battery was able to reduce its safety liability. UL-listed smoke vents with polycarbonate domes not only provide ample daylighting, but they are life-saving devices. The smoke vent is designed with two thermal triggered hatches that automatically open up in the event of a fire.

Fire marshals and insurance companies recognize the benefits of a UL-listed smoke vent skylight because they allow the smoke, heat and hot gasses inside a burning warehouse to escape providing trapped workers a visible route for safe exit. They also reduce smoke damage to warehouse inventories. In many cases, insurance companies will provide a much needed break on rates when UL-listed smoke vents are added to the rooftop.

The smoke vent is designed with two thermal triggered hatches that automatically open up in the event of a fire.

The smoke vent is designed with two thermal triggered hatches that automatically open up in the event of a fire.

The reroof was performed by Highland Commercial Roofing, Baldwin Park, Calif. The commercial roofer specializes in and provided Trojan Battery headquarters with a RainShield seamless single-ply roofing system. The RainShield system, reinforced with a tough polyester mat, uses waterproofing-grade asphalts and highly reflective elastomeric acrylic surfacing to create a seamless, waterproof, highly reflective membrane providing a permanent, high-performance roofing system guaranteed not to leak for at least 20 years. The cool roof system chosen reflects more than 80 percent of the sun’s radiant heat, which can reduce a building’s cooling cost by as much as 50 percent.

With average temperatures and power costs rising, building owners and occupant are looking for new innovative ways to save money. Highland Commercial Roofing recommends a complete analysis of the skylights when owners consider reroofing their building. Replacing old, ineffective skylights at the time of reroof is the most cost effective method for the investment.

SOPREMA Expands Manufacturing Facility to Accelerate Services

SOPREMA expands its Gulfport, Mississippi manufacturing facility in an effort to increase product offerings and expedite production. The expansion comes as a solution to continued growth that the Gulfport operations team has experienced and will further accelerate service to the market.

The Gulfport facility completes a 21,250 square foot addition, with its location situated on SOPREMA’s campus which encompasses manufacturing, product testing, distribution and a training facility. The expansion is used for both additional product offering and warehouse of product and materials in various stages of the production process.

“The expansion is an opportunity to continue to support the SOPREMA growth initiatives as our business grows,” said Kent Furcron, Gulfport plant manager, SOPREMA. “We are proud that our facility is now able to produce more product and provide additional jobs in the region.”

Garland Company Opens Renovated Training Center

Recruits at the Garland Company will be the first to go through training in Garland’s renovated training center. After nearly 100 years in the Union-Miles neighborhood on East 91st Street in Cleveland, Garland has made another investment in the community – and an investment in their team of employees.

Garland purchased a 16,000 square feet building next door to their corporate headquarters in 2015 and began rennovations. Newly named The Soliday Center — in honor of one of Garland’s first salesmen and trainers — the renovated building serves as the training center for future Garland sales representatives and employees. With the 2,000 square feet training room at the heart of the structure, the building will also offer office space for Garland corporate employees and corporate events.

In the last century, Garland has purchased one dozen adjacent properties in Cleveland totaling more than $10.3 million in investments. In 2009, Garland received the Brownfield Cleanup of the Year award for their purchase and renovation of the former Baker Steel building on East 91st Street. With the addition of the new Soliday Center property, Garland now occupies approximately 200,000 square feet of manufacturing, warehouse and office space on more than seven and a half acres.

“Our people are an asset. The culture that we build with our new employees is vital to our company’s success, and this new facility is a place to build that culture. This space is a great way to show our commitment to our people and our neighborhood,” Scott Craft, VP and general manager at the Garland Company.

Self-flashing Skylights on Commercial Warehouses Are Beginning to Leak

Today, many commercial roofers are dealing with a large-scale problem—reinstalling and replacing leaky self-flashing skylights on commercial warehouses. I have seen firsthand how improper installation of self-flashing skylights has become a headache for commercial property owners.

many of the skylights installed on commercial warehouse properties in the western Sunbelt states were installed improperly because they were installed first and foremost as fall protection for the open floor in the roof during construction by the builder and not by the roofer.

Many of the self-flashing skylights installed on commercial warehouse properties in the western Sunbelt states were installed improperly because they were installed first and foremost as fall protection for the open floor in the roof during construction by the builder and not by the roofer.

Around the late 1970s and early 1980s, intermodal freight became a huge part of global distribution. To handle the increase in freight projects, warehouse construction exploded. The Port of Oakland, for instance, invested heavily in intermodal container transfer capabilities in the ’80s. In fact, the aggressive growth of intermodal freight distribution continued into the early 2000s.

The cheapest and easiest way for skylights to be installed on these warehouses was to use self-flashing skylights. The metal curb or L bracket attached to the bottom of the skylight was, in theory, supposed to be set on top of the built-up roofing material and then stripped in, sandwiching the flange between he roofing layers. The result would be roofing material, then skylight, then more roofing material over the flashing on the skylight.

Unfortunately, many of the skylights installed on commercial warehouse properties in the western Sunbelt states were installed improperly because they were installed first and foremost as fall protection for the open floor in the roof during construction by the builder and not by the roofer. Our teams have seen thousands of these original self-flashing skylight installations where self-flashing flanges are set directly on the plywood roof deck, below all the roofing materials.

Most of the original roofers didn’t budget in the time and money it took to pull the skylight assembly apart from the roof deck and re-install it the proper way. Nor did they wash the oils off the new metal from the galvanizing process or use asphalt primer to prep the steel flanges of the assembly and ensure the roofing asphalt would stick properly. Over the years, as the metal of the skylight flanges expanded and contracted and the built-up roof did the same, but at a different rate, the roofing system eventually separated from the skylight, leaving a self-flashing skylight that’s now turned into what we jokingly refer to as a “self-leaking skylight”. This is part of the reason why everyone thinks skylights always leak.

The best way we’ve found to install leak-free skylights on a commercial warehouse roof, especially when re- placing the self-flashing skylights on an existing building, is to use a curb-mounted skylight. A curb-mounted skylight fits like a shoebox lid over a new curb the roofing contractor fabricates as part of the installation. This curbed design eliminates the metal flange and offers waterproofing redundancy in critical areas of the installation, so water can’t get into the building at the skylight opening. Because the new skylight is installed on a curb, it’s also much easier to address any future issues with the skylight or to replace it down the road if necessary. This especially comes in handy when owners lease to new tenants. New building occupancy regulations mean skylights may be required by municipalities to be changed out for smoke vents to comply with fire codes.

If you’re dealing with one or more self-flashing skylight leaks, there are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Check if there is condensation on the inside of the skylight; a lot of skylights have a trough where condensation runoff will leak into the building.
  • Be sure to check the juncture where the skylight and the roof meet (the skylight base flashing), which can sometimes include up to 5 inches of mastic at the base flashing.
  • If the skylight has a frameless acrylic cap without a metal frame around the outside, check the acrylic dome for stress cracks. It is possible to replace some acrylic domes on some skylights but often the cost of an acrylic dome is roughly the same as the cost of a new skylight, and if you’re already considering installing a new roof with a 15- to 20-year warranty, it doesn’t make much sense to leave the “self-leaking skylight” frame in place. Replacing the skylights during the reroofing project is much more cost-effective than re- turning to replace skylights later. In addition, skylight technology is far better now than it was 15 or 20 years ago (think about today’s impact-resistant polycarbonate and better UV and fall protection).

Above all else, don’t let self-flashing skylights give you and your roofing business a bad name. Instead, address the issue with your commercial clients and educate them about the best choices for their skylights and how they can stay current with the International Building Code and municipal codes. You’ll be helping them protect one of their biggest assets by ensuring their skylights stay leak-free.

PHOTOS: Highland Commercial Roofing

RM Lucas Establishes New Headquarters and Manufacturing Plant

RM Lucas announces the new Lucas headquarters and manufacturing plant.

RM Lucas moved into a new Lucas headquarters and manufacturing plant.

RM Lucas moved into a new Lucas headquarters and manufacturing plant. The facility is located at 12400 S. Laramie Ave. in Alsip, Ill. The location has frontage on Interstate 294 that circles Chicago and provides easy access for shipping and receiving to all points in North America.

The 92,000-square-foot facility features 12,000 square feet of offices, 5,000 square feet of research and development space and 75,000 square feet of warehouse and manufacturing. New mixing, filling and laboratory testing equipment will be installed in the new facility. Production is scheduled to start in late 2015. This facility will replace a smaller sealants plant opened in 2013. The Chicago plant will continue operations with expanded capacity for asphalt products.

Roofinox Expands Sales and Distribution of Products in the U.S.

Roofinox International, a European-based, 30-year-old manufacturer of metal roofing materials, has announced plans to expand sales and distribution of three key products in the U.S. through its subsidiary, Roofinox America Inc.

Products include Roofinox Classic, a brush-rolled material designed for roofing and wall cladding, Roofinox Plus .0157, a ribbed surface material for smoother roofing results and economy and Roofinox Terne-Coated with a tin-plated surface that develops a matt grey patina finish over time.

The announcement comes in response to an increasing demand for Roofinox products since 2012 when the only domestic manufacturer of terne-coated steel products went out of business.

“From then on we supplied to various projects all over the U.S. with increasing quantities every year,” notes Pascal Metzler, who with his brother, Marc, own the company. “In 2014 we decided to move to the U.S. by opening an office and warehouse from where we could service the increasing demand,” he notes. Meanwhile, sales in Europe were also continuing to grow with marketing and distribution to Poland, Russia, Slovenia and Sweden. The company also regularly supplied its unique products to various commercial projects in strong markets like Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia and Singapore. Last year, the company started selling the Roofinox product range in Turkey as well. And while Roofinox is currently examining business relations in several more countries, Metzler emphasizes the main efforts are now to grow market share in the U.S.

He notes the technology for his products date back to 1995 with the development of inoxidable (stainless) steel as a roofing material. The idea behind the product was to create a stainless steel specifically designed for roofing and roll-forming. “We found two major features that made it ideal for the application—mechanical properties and surface design with an architecturally distinctive matt finish for rollformed roofing panels. The product features within these two areas differentiated Roofinox from any other product in the roofing market, he contends and the success of Roofinox Classic and Roofinox tin-plated led to the development of several more products available today.

Architectural demand for Roofinox as a natural metal is very high, notes Metzler. “Aging is no problem for Roofinox because the surface is all natural and typically does not change over time.” In addition, he notes that Roofinox products achieve superior results for LEED-related construction and the sustainability of building products. “More and more building owners are looking into long-lasting and environmentally friendly products,” he notes. And there’s the issue of durability.

“Increasing weather extremes require more durable solutions for roofing and Roofinox stainless steel is the best solution for these environments because it was originally developed for Switzerland and Austria in a region known for challenging weather conditions.”

The current goal is to develop nationwide relationships with metal fabricators and installers who need a reliable source for quality architectural grade stainless steel and tin-plated materials the company offers.

Roofinox materials also offer growth potential to contractors who can now differentiate through specializing into more sophisticated work. “Some of the largest institutional building owners, such as the armed forces, school and education authorities, hospitals and churches, are specifying stainless steel for these reasons—it simply is a very high-quality roofing material,” Metzler notes.

One of the brothers’ first steps toward expansion has been the recruitment of David Rowe, a 28-year veteran of the metal roofing and wall panel industry, who has been named vice president-sales of Roofinox America Inc. Rowe joined Roofinox from Englert Inc., an American manufacturer of metal and aluminum roofing and wall panel coil, where he was director of product management responsible for the planning, development and introduction of all new products.

CertainTeed Opens Warehouse in First Phase of Midwest Production and Distribution Site

CertainTeed Corp. has commemorated the opening of a new state-of-the-art 150,000 square-foot roofing product warehouse, located 60 miles west of St. Louis in Jonesburg, Mo. The warehouse is the first phase of a planned $100 million complex set to open in 2016, which will serve as the Midwestern production and distribution site for all of the company’s high-performance roofing products, optimally servicing Central U.S. customers.

The baseball-themed open house event, “Rounding Third and Heading for Home,” allowed guests, including contractors, architects, distributors and local dignitaries, an opportunity to participate in educational seminars, product demonstrations and tours of the new facility.

“Opening this spectacular new warehouse on schedule is a testament to our firm commitment to the St. Louis community, as well as the graciousness of state and local officials,: says Tom Smith, president of CertainTeed Roofing. “Our company was founded over a century ago in St. Louis, and we’re proud to say we’re well on our way to having another home base in the area, which will guarantee efficient, local order delivery.”

Construction is already underway for the 60,000 square-foot manufacturing facility that will produce CertainTeed’s highly popular Landmark roofing shingles. When complete, the facility will serve as the production and distribution site for residential roofing shingles, bringing approximately 100 new permanent, local jobs to the community over the next few years, along with an estimated 400 ancillary local jobs in trucking, welding and maintenance services.

In addition to the Jonesburg facility, CertainTeed operates 10 asphalt shingle plants, one low-slope commercial roofing facility and three stand-alone granule production plants throughout the U.S. ‹ which includes the world’s largest roofing plant in Oxford, N.C.