North Carolina Legislative Building Restoration Poses Unique Challenges

The North Carolina State Legislative Building was the site of a renovation project that included asbestos abatement in the interior and a complete restoration of the building’s roof systems.

The North Carolina State Legislative Building was the site of a renovation project that included asbestos abatement in the interior and a complete restoration of the building’s roof systems. Photos: SkySite Images

Some of the variables that can make a project difficult include a variety of complex, interconnected systems, unique design elements, and a tight schedule. These challenges are heightened on a highly visible, historic building, where the goal of keeping the design historically accurate must be balanced with making improvements to the structure and functionality of the systems. All of these elements and more were in play during the restoration of the one-of-a-kind roof on the North Carolina State Legislative Building in Raleigh, North Carolina. It took a talented team of design, engineering, and roofing professionals to bring the project to a successful conclusion.

Originally designed by architect Edward Durell Stone, the building has been the home of the state legislature since 1963, but water intrusion under its copper pyramids and at windows and doors on the promenade level precipitated a complete restoration project. Renovation work conducted in 2016 and 2017 included asbestos abatement in the interior and a complete restoration of the building’s roof systems.

The roofing phase of the project included removing and replacing the metal roof systems on the five copper-clad pyramids, as well as re-roofing the low-slope sections adjacent to the pyramids with a two-ply modified bitumen system. A liquid-applied waterproofing system was installed in the planter areas and under the pavers in the promenade section. The project also involved the removal and replacement of windows, doors, and skylights, as well as repairing and coating the concrete surfaces at the perimeter of the roof.

The design of the quilted flat lock copper panel system involved 17 different panel profiles. A false batten was added after the panels were in place.

The design of the quilted flat lock copper panel system involved 17 different panel profiles. A false batten was added after the panels were in place. Photos: SkySite Images

Companies involved in the project included Raymond Engineering, headquartered in Raleigh, North Carolina, which provided engineering and architectural services; Owens Roofing Inc., also located in Raleigh, which served as the general contractor on the roofing phase of the project and installed the low-slope systems; and The Century Slate Company, headquartered in Durham, North Carolina, which removed and replaced the copper roofs on the five pyramids.

Some of the key players in the project shared their insights with Roofing, including John Willers, a senior engineer with Raymond Engineering; Bert Owens, president of Owens Roofing; and Mike Tenoever, president of Century Slate.

“This is an iconic state building with a unique roof system which the owner and designer required to be aesthetically replicated,” Tenoever notes. “At the same time, some functionality and technical improvements were incorporated. This is a very high-profile project with a lot of complexity, particularly given the schedule. There were a lot of details compressed into a very short period of time.”

Design and Pre-Construction

Raymond Engineering conducted testing on the existing roofs and specified systems designed to match the originals and provide some necessary improvements, including added insulation and ventilation under the pyramids. Willers worked closely with Jason Mobraten, the senior architect on the project. “We provided the engineering and architectural services, beginning with design and then assisting with bidding and managing the construction phase of this project,” says Willers. “We engineered the copper roof, all of the detailing for the modified asphalt roof, and the detailing for the drainage, the pavers, and the sealants for the promenade.”

Crews from Owens Roofing removed the existing plants, media and drainage system from four 42-foot-by-42-foot fixed planters with skylights. After the substrate was cleaned and primed, a liquid-applied waterproofing system was installed.

Crews from Owens Roofing removed the existing plants, media and drainage system from four 42-foot-by-42-foot fixed planters with skylights. After the substrate was cleaned and primed, a liquid-applied waterproofing system was installed. Photos: SkySite Images

The schedule was an obvious challenge, as the majority of the work had to be completed while the legislature was in recess, and there were substantial financial penalties that would come into play if the work was not completed on time. “The client also required that the asbestos abatement be completed before re-roofing the copper-clad pyramids to avoid the risk of dislodging the asbestos-containing textured ceiling finish. However, doing the work in two phases allowed the asbestos contractor to get started while the rest of the job was designed and bid,” Willers states.

The building houses legislators’ offices, and it was open and occupied during construction, with the exception of the areas undergoing asbestos abatement. The schedule had to be carefully adjusted as the job progressed. “In addition to our role in monitoring the technical aspects of the construction, we closely monitored the construction phasing and sequencing, as it was directly driven by the schedule of the state legislature,” Willers notes. “We had to take a lot of care in developing the schedule and monitoring it.”

Willers and Mobraten knew that the details on this project would be crucial. “There were previously some issues where the copper and the low-slope membrane roofs met,” Willers says. “We detailed that very carefully so that we had redundancy in keeping that watertight.”

Extensive mock-ups of the copper pyramids were constructed and tested to ensure the quilted pattern could be exactly replicated while avoiding the leaks that plagued the existing structure.

Photos: SkySite Images

Photos: SkySite Images

As designers looked for ways to improve construction, they explored the design and construction of the quilted panels. “From a design standpoint, we wondered why we had this odd diamond-shaped pattern,” Willers recalls. “After we played with the dimensions a bit, we realized that if you fly over the building, from above all of those diamond sections look like squares.”

The key was to replicate the design with its false battens while avoiding leaks. “We were concerned about how to detail out the joining of the copper sheets that formed the diamond-shaped panels,” Willers says. “What had been done was susceptible to windblown rain getting in. We did two things differently: the little clips that supported these battens were secured by forming the clips with hooks that would be integral with the single-locked seams and soldering the clips to the top surface of the copper panels. Previously they were held in place by pop rivets, which went through the copper.”

The Secrets of the Pyramids

Century Slate was well prepared to tackle the copper roofing on the project. The company has been in business more than 20 years, and it specializes in historic restoration projects including slate, tile, wood, copper and other historical metals.

Crews from Century Slate removed the existing copper panels. The copper was salvaged and recycled.

Crews from Century Slate removed the existing copper panels. The copper was salvaged and recycled. Photos: SkySite Images

Tenoever knew the design of the original quilted flat lock copper panel system needed to be replicated exactly. “There were 17 different panel profiles, each within a very particular location within the roof’s quilted pattern,” Tenoever notes. “Proper placement of each different profile was essential to the whole system working correctly and looking like the original.”

The first step was to remove the existing copper roofs. “We tore off the entire system down to the deck,” Tenoever explains. “We then installed a semi permeable a vapor barrier, insulation, and a vapor retarder.”

Along with added insulation and Carlisle WIP 300HT self-adhering underlayment, crews also installed a vented nail base from Hunter Panels. “The Hunter Cool-Vent is a vented nail base that gets screwed down,” Tenoever says. “The goal was to have a breathable air cavity. All of the hip caps are actually vented to allow the air to get out.”

With the addition of the insulation and nail base, the roof was built up approximately 6 inches from the previous configuration. This added height necessitated changes in the custom flashing at the base of the pyramids but did not change the configuration of the copper panels.

In all, 22,500 square feet of copper panels fabricated by K&M Sheet Metal in Durham were installed. Each of the 17 different panels was labeled with a letter code. “When they were out at the site, we could just grab an A panel or a B panel, as needed, and bring them to that layout,” Tenoever explains. “Four of the pyramids were the same, and the center one was different, as that was the one that had skylights built into it.”

The areas between the pyramids were covered with a two-ply modified bitumen roofing system. Photos: SkySite Images

The panels feature flat-lock clips that were screwed down to the nail base. “It’s a typical flat seam panel system, and the panels interlock together,” says Tenoever. “You can see the batten panel above it, which is an aesthetic feature. The battens and the clips that held them were amazingly intricate, for what they were. They were cut out with a CNC machine and soldered onto the copper panels prior to installation. Later we came back and installed the batten system over the top.”

Century Slate built new curbs in the center pyramid for the new skylights, which were manufactured by Wasco. “The skylights were one of the last things to go on,” says Tenoever. “They were custom made because even though they look square, there isn’t a square angle on them.”

Custom copper flashings were installed at the bases. “One of the trickier parts for us probably would have been the tie-in of the modified roof, because Owens Roofing had to do their bit, and we were also replacing all of the wood blocking and everything all along the bottom edge before we could put our flashing on,” Tenoever recalls. “It took a lot of coordination between the two trades, but it all worked out.”

The Low-Slope Roof Systems

Owens Roofing served as the general contractor on the project and installed the low-slope roof systems. The company was established in 1986 in Raleigh, and focuses on commercial and institutional buildings, almost exclusively re-roofing. Much of its work is on historic buildings, so Owens was confident he could execute the project and complete it on schedule.

A scaffolding system offered secure roof access, but material had to be loaded and removed from one access point, so logistics had to be carefully mapped out.

A scaffolding system offered secure roof access, but material had to be loaded and removed from one access point, so logistics had to be carefully mapped out. Photos: SkySite Images

Crews from Owens Roofing installed 18,900 square feet of modified bitumen roofing from Soprema over concrete decks, including the areas between the pyramids. Tapered polyiso and half-inch DEXcell cover board from National Gypsum were installed using Duotack adhesive, followed by the two plies of modified bitumen membrane.

A liquid waterproofing system from Sika was specified for the large planter areas. Crews from Owens Roofing removed the existing plants, media and drainage system from four 42-foot-by-42-foot fixed planters with skylights. After the substrate had been cleaned and primed, the Sika RoofPro system was installed.

“Once it’s cleaned and primed, it’s pretty simple,” says Owens. “The product is one part, and you don’t even have to mix it. We applied it with rollers on this project. You embed fabric sheets in the system and then topcoat it. It was a cold-weather job, but fortunately we caught a break last winter in that it wasn’t as cold as usual, and we didn’t miss as much time as we might have.”

The 30,000-square-foot promenade section was originally covered by white granite pavers native to North Carolina. The old pavers were removed and replaced over a new roof system, which was comprised of modified bitumen sheets beneath the liquid-applied waterproofing system. “The concrete deck was primed and a modified bitumen base ply heat welded to the deck,” Owens explains. “This surface was primed in preparation for the Roof Pro system, which was then installed.”

Innovative Roof Services of Raleigh was called in to conduct a high-voltage electrical testing to ensure there were no voids in the system before the pavers were re-installed. The pavers had originally been set in a bed of mortar, and they had to be removed and cleaned, which revealed a problem. “When we took the pavers up, we found out that they ranged between 1-1/8 and 1-3/4 inches thick,” Owens notes. “That wasn’t a problem when they were set in a bed of mortar, but over extruded polystyrene, they would have been all up and down. We put in a change order and had the pavers set in a bed of sand on top of one layer polystyrene.” The sand was adjusted by hand to ensure the pavers were level. New pavers were added to replace those broken over the years.

On the roof’s concrete eyebrows, damaged areas of concrete were repaired, joints were sealed, and a cold-applied waterproofing system from Sika Sarnafil was used to cover 8,800 square feet of concrete.

Numerous Challenges

Important considerations on the project included safety and logistics, as well as the tight schedule. Safety was paramount, and a third-party safety monitor was on the site to ensure the safety plan was designed and executed properly. During the time between when the original skylights were removed and when their replacements installed, the voids in the roof deck needed to be cordoned off and covered according to OSHA regulations. Personal fall arrest systems were used on the pyramids and outside of the safety perimeter, which was marked with flags. “With the promenade, you had a wide concrete eyebrow, so it made it easier to set up the safety lines and keep everyone safely away from the edge,” Owens notes.

This aerial photo taken before the restoration project shows the copper roofs with their green patina. Photos: SkySite Images

“Safety is a key concern as on all jobs, but this one in particular was highly visible out the windows of the nearby Department of Labor,” Owens continues. “We were paid a courtesy visit and agreed with them that an on-site safety meeting conducted by their personnel might be useful. The owner allowed us use of one of their auditoriums and we had a very productive half-day meeting for all trades. Every week we had a meeting with a state construction monitor.”

A scaffolding system was set up that offered secure roof access, but there was only one point for loading and unloading material, so logistics at the site were a concern. “We had to use wheelbarrows and roof carts to transport materials back and forth to the scaffolding tower,” Tenoever notes. “Between the removal of the original roof and the installation of the multiple layers of the new roof system, over 150,000 square feet of roofing materials were moved by hand over an average distance of approximately 200 feet.”

Loading and unloading added another wrinkle to the complicated schedule. “The schedule was based on when the legislature was scheduled to come back to town—not how long the job was supposed to take,” Owens says. “We were all concerned with the ambitious time frame and $1,000 a day liquidated damages included with this job.”

Willers cited excellent communication as one of the keys to completing the project on time. “Fortunately, the project managers for the general contractor and other trades were highly organized individuals,” Willers says. “Regular site meetings were detailed and thorough. Although setbacks did occur, communication kept the ball rolling.”

The roof system on the building’s iconic copper clad pyramids was removed and carefully recreated, matching the original design while adding a vented cavity and increasing the thermal insulation. Photos: SkySite Images

A Unique Experience

Copper removed from the existing roof was salvaged and recycled, notes Willers, with the exception of a few pieces that

were cut into the shape of the state of North Carolina to serve as mementos of the unique project. “We’re very proud of the design and the outcome—and the assistance we got from all of the contractors involved,” Willers says. “We had some pretty heavy rains after the project was completed, including some high winds, and there were no leaks.”

Tenoever also looks back on the project with pride. “A one-of-a-kind roof system was custom built and delivered on schedule and with the owner and designer’s praises,” he says. “Taking something so amazing and restoring it to the beauty it originally had—we all get a kick out of that.”

TEAM

Design and Engineering Services: Raymond Engineering, Raleigh, North Carolina, RaymondLLC.com
General Contractor: Owens Roofing Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina
Metal Roofing Contractor: The Century Slate Company, Durham, North Carolina, CenturySlate.com
Leak Testing: Innovative Roof Services, LLC, Raleigh, North Carolina, IRS-LLC.net

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System
Copper: 20-ounce copper sheet metal
Vented Nail Base: Hunter Cool-Vent, Hunter Panels, HunterPanels.com
Underlayment: Carlisle WIP 300HT, Carlisle, Carlislewipproducts.com
Skylights: Wasco Skylights, Wascoskylights.com

Modified Bitumen Membrane Roof System

Membrane: Sopralene Flam 180 and Sopralene Flam 180 FR GR, Soprema, Soprema.us
Adhesive: Duotack, Soprema
Insulation: Sopra-Iso, Soprema
Cover Board: DEXcell, National Gypsum, NationalGypsum.com

Waterproofing System

Liquid Applied Membrane: RoofPro 641, Sika Corp., USA.Sika.com
Reinforcing Fabric: Reemat, Sika Corp.
Primer: Sikalastic EP Primer/Sealer
Extruded Polystyrene Insulation: Foamular 604, Owens Corning, OwensCorning.com

Contractor Restores the Roof on the Museum Beneath St. Louis’ Historic Gateway Arch

Western Specialty Contractors restored the roof of the Museum of Westward Expansion located beneath the Gateway Arch in St. Louis. This photo shows the protection board being installed prior to adding the leak detection system.

Western Specialty Contractors restored the roof of the Museum of Westward Expansion located beneath the Gateway Arch in St. Louis. This shows the protection board installed prior to adding the leak detection system.

The St. Louis branch of Western Specialty Contractors recently completed a project to restore and waterproof the roof of the Museum of Westward Expansion located beneath the iconic Gateway Arch on the St. Louis Riverfront. The work is part of a multi-phase project, spearheaded by nonprofit organization CityArchRiver Foundation, to expand and renovate the underground museum, plus renovate the grounds surrounding the Arch. The Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, which includes the Gateway Arch, Museum of Westward Expansion and the surrounding park, is maintained by the National Park Service.

Opened to the public in 1976, the Museum of Westward Expansion has undergone very few changes since its grand opening. The size of a football field, the museum features rare Native American Indian artifacts and materials documenting the days of Lewis and Clark and the 19th century pioneers who shaped the history of the American West.

Work on the 100,000-square-foot museum roof project began with removing sod and sandy soil covering the top of the roof and 10-28 inches of Elastizell engineered fill using a bulldozer. Next, the existing waterproof membrane was removed from the structural concrete deck.

After two layers of modified bitumen sheet waterproofing were installed, crews apply a coat of adhesive to adhere the asphaltic protection board.

After two layers of modified bitumen sheet waterproofing were installed, crews apply a coat of adhesive to adhere the asphaltic protection board.

Once the deck was exposed, Western crews went to work identifying and repairing leaks in the existing museum lid that had been present for many years, as the existing waterproofing had exceeded its lifespan. Several methods were used to evaluate the condition of the structural concrete deck, which included a chain-drag sounding along with visually identifying delamination and cracks.

Western crews then installed a two-ply Laurenco modified bitumen sheet waterproofing system covered with WR Meadows PC2 protection board. An electronic leak detection system followed by a permanent leak detection grid system were installed over the protection board. Crews then installed a layer of 1-1/2 inch, 60-psi Dow extruded polystyrene with an additional layer of the protection board and a J-Drain 780 drainage mat.

The next phase of the project involved waterproofing the 42,000-square-foot horizontal lid and the 37,000-square-foot vertical walls of the museum addition. Western’s scope of work in this area included installing a two-ply modified bitumen sheet waterproofing and protection board, as well as an electronic leak detection system, along with two layers of extruded polystyrene. A layer of extruded polystyrene was also installed on the vertical walls, followed by the drainage mat on both the horizontal and vertical walls.

During portions of the project Western crews were working over occupied space, as the museum was largely operational during construction.

During portions of the project Western crews were working over occupied space, as the museum was largely operational during construction.

Additional waterproofing of the north and south museum entrances encompassed approximately 13,800 square feet, which included approximately 5,000 square feet of deck around each leg of the Arch.

The museum was largely operational during construction, and for much of the project Western crews were working over occupied space. The company sequenced the removal of existing roofing material so that they could remove, clean and install new roofing material daily to keep the museum dry during construction.

Testing was a daily requirement during the waterproofing installation. Western was required to complete a pull test for every 500 square feet and take moisture readings for every 100 square feet. Daily observation reports had to be completed during the waterproofing application, with all testing results and location tests documented along with the weather conditions. Additionally, Western crews took 50 photos daily to document the testing and work area.

Construction on the Arch grounds began in August 2013, while renovations to the museum and visitor center began in April 2015. The multi-phase project is still underway, and the improved underground Museum of Westward Expansion is expected to be finished by summer 2018.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Western Specialty Contractors, St. Louis, Westernspecialtycontractors.com

MATERIALS

Waterproofing System: Laurenco Waterproofing, Laurencowaterproofing.com
Protection Board: WR Meadows, WRmeadows.com
Extruded Polystyrene: Dow, Dow.com
Drainage Mat: J-Drain, J-Drain.com

ATAS Promotes Sales Team Members

ATAS International announced three new District Sales Managers and a new Architectural Business Development Manager. The realignment of the sales team will provide for additional education and communication with its employees and customers.

Steven Minunni is the new Northeast District Sales Manager for ATAS. He has worked for ATAS for 19 years and has been a Product Representative in Upstate New York for his entire tenure. His sales expertise and ATAS product knowledge have earned him the Malan S. Parker Award for Salesman of the Year in 2001, 2007, and 2011.

The new ATAS Southeast District Sales Manager is David Srokose. He has almost 30 years of experience in the construction industry. His first position in construction sales was with ATAS as a Product Representative from 1989 to 1996. Since then, he worked in sales for companies that provide products for different applications within the industry, including low slope roofing, waterproofing and air barriers. Srokose returned to ATAS in 2013, taking the position of Architectural Business Development Manager, which includes managing corporate accounts.

Pat Starr is the new Midwest District Sales Manager for ATAS. He has 23 years of experience in the industry, selling ATAS product the whole time. He was first part of the ATAS family from 1994 to 1998. Starr returned to ATAS in 2014, taking on the Product Representative position in the Pittsburgh area.

ATAS’ new Architectural Business Development Manager is Dave Weidl. Weidl has worked for ATAS for 16 years and has been a Product Representative centrally located in Ohio for his entire tenure. His sales expertise and ATAS product knowledge have earned him the Malan S. Parker Award for Salesman of the Year in 2004. According to the company, he will continue the development of unique solutions that benefit our customers, including corporate accounts.

“As ATAS has continued to grow, we saw the need to add additional employees in district, product, and specific market management roles. Education and training for our customers and our employees is of high importance to ATAS, and these individuals were chosen for their new positions due to their commitment to this key component of our quality policy,” said ATAS National Sales Manager Mark Bus.

For more information, visit www.atas.com.

Preserving History at Indiana State University

The State of Indiana approved a $16 million renovation project

The State of Indiana approved a $16 million renovation project that restored Normal Hall to its former glory. This photo shows the exterior after the renovation was completed. Photo: Indiana State University

Completed in 1909, Normal Hall is the second oldest surviving building on the Indiana State University campus in Terre Haute, Ind. Since then, Normal Hall has undergone multiple renovations, including an addition added in 1957. But by 2010, the grand neo-classical building was largely unoccupied and falling into disrepair. The hall maintained its perch at the center of campus, but years of service to its tens of thousands of students had taken their toll.

“We try to preserve the history of ISU here on campus,” says Seth Porter of ISU facility management. “But between roof leaks and other issues, it was becoming an eyesore.” So, the State of Indiana approved a $16 million renovation project and partnered with architectural firm arcDESIGN to bring the building back to life.

“This renovation will return Normal Hall to its rightful place in the center of campus life,” says ISU President Dan Bradley. “The project will provide a valuable new resource to students while preserving and re-energizing a significant historic structure in the heart of campus.”

Aside from the stately Indiana limestone, the building had to be redone from the foundation to the roof. And the history that makes Normal Hall special also made for unique challenges in the design and renovation process.

They Don’t Build Them Like They Used To

“People will say, ‘They don’t build them like they used to,’” says Greg Miller, project manager from arcDESIGN. And in many cases, “It’s a good thing they don’t!”

Normal Hall has undergone multiple renovations

Normal Hall has undergone multiple renovations since it was completed in 1909, but by 2010, the neo-classical building was largely unoccupied and in need of major structural repairs. Photo: Indiana State University Archive

Normal Hall was originally designed for and used as the university’s central library. At that time in history, after the Civil War and before the 1920s, libraries were built in a certain way. Due to open flames of gas lighting and unreliable supply of electricity, indoor lighting at the time could have been dangerous to a library’s collection. So, libraries were designed to maximize natural light, with plenty of windows, skylights, and even glass floors. Instead of structural walls, Normal Hall’s six levels of bookshelves—or “stacks”—were designed to be structurally self-supporting, independent of the rest of the building.

Miller led the design team through the challenging process of removing the six-level stacks and replacing them with four new floors for offices and building systems. A portion of the stacks system was salvaged and reconstructed, providing the same view patrons would have had more than 100 years ago.

The Biggest Challenge

During construction, crews discovered unstable structural conditions on the north side of the building adjacent to the original six-story stacks system. The entire exterior wall had to be removed and replaced, all while supporting the existing attic and roof nearly 60-feet above the ground floor.

To do this, crews constructed a mammoth 60-foot-high temporary structural system in and through the six-story iron stacks system still in place to support the original attic and roof deck. The north wall was completely removed and reconstructed. Structural steel columns supporting roof trusses were replaced while ends of deteriorated roof trusses were reconstructed in place.

“It was a monumental feat,” Miller says. “It was a great example of teamwork by Indiana State University, design consultants and the contractor.”

The Roof System

For the roof replacement portion of the project, arcDESIGN collaborated with The Garland Company Inc., a leader of high-performance roof and building envelope solutions. Garland worked with local roofing contractor Associated Roofing Professionals (ARP) to install a new modified bitumen roof system with a high albedo coating.

All existing roofing was removed to structure and Garland’s StressPly EUV fiberglass-polyester reinforced, SBS and SIS modified bitumen membrane was installed to provide long-term waterproofing protection.

Associated Roofing Professionals installed a new modified bitumen roof system

Associated Roofing Professionals installed a new modified bitumen roof system manufactured by The Garland Company. After the modified bitumen membrane was installed, the roof was then coated with Garland’s Pyramic white, nontoxic, reflective acrylic coating. Photo: The Garland Company Inc.

The roof was then coated with Garland’s Pyramic white, nontoxic, acrylic coating, which helps preserve asphaltic or modified bitumen surfaces and significantly reduces under-roof temperatures to create a more energy-efficient environment.

“ISU has a strong commitment to the environment, and we were able to help them achieve their performance goals while also contributing to LEED credits with our environmentally-conscious products,” explains Rick Ryherd, area manager for Garland.

The largest—and brightest—rehabilitation involved the stained-glass dome atop Normal Hall. The original dome had deteriorated so extensively that, by the middle of the 20th century, the remaining glass panels were completely removed and the dome was completely hidden. A suspended plaster ceiling sealed off the once grand rotunda. “Imagine just a skeleton, an empty dome with only the ribs visible,” said Miller.

The dome restoration began with historic photos, documents and forensic analysis. The glass art featured distinguished educators and philosophers. Some of the original stained-glass panels were recovered from the building, whiles others had to be recreated. Conrad Schmitt Studios, in Wisconsin, restored the stained glass to its former glory. With the stained glass restored, rehab on the rotunda continued. Inside Normal Hall, the rotunda mural was restored and more than 140 light bulb sockets were re-wired to light the dome. Above the dome, a new 40-foot octagonal skylight was installed, along with supplemental lighting. Below the rotunda, 20 original columns that stretch through the open hall were restored with scagliola and paint finishes.

The crew worked to save original hardware and finishes that hadn’t already been lost to time. They were able to restore and replicate plaster moldings and cornices, save original wood doors and casings, and restore the grand marble and bronze staircase. “The general contractor did a great job preserving the historic detail with the extra time they put into restoring this building,” notes Porter.

The Future of Normal Hall

With all the time and effort put into preserving the history, the team did not forget to focus on the future of Normal Hall. The team, starting with arcDESIGN, incorporated the old and the new seamlessly.

The north exterior wall had to be removed

The north exterior wall had to be removed and replaced, so crews constructed a 60-foot-high temporary structure to support the existing attic and roof. Photo: Greg Miller, arcDESIGN.

For starters, Miller said the design was intended to respect but not imitate the building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Rather, he said, “the design clearly communicates original versus new construction to patrons.” Miller consulted experts from the team, from historians to a representative from the roofing manufacturer to gather the full scope of the project.

Today, the original stately limestone structure is accentuated by the addition, comprised predominantly of glass and Indiana limestone. The addition houses functional requirements such as stairs, elevators, restrooms and mechanical services, maximizing use of the historic interior spaces.

The renovation was planned and constructed to achieve LEED Certification by the USGBC. Renovation included new HVAC systems utilizing the university’s existing central steam heating plant that runs on natural gas. LED lighting throughout is an energy efficient replacement for the building, originally built with combination gas and electric light fixtures.

100 Years in the Making

Re-dedicated in October 2015, Normal Hall is back in action at the center of campus as home to the university’s Center for Student Success and numerous tutors, counselors and mentors. Below the rotunda, more than 100 years after the building opened its doors, students gather in the university Reading Room and Gallery modeled after the original hall when it opened to students in 1909.

TEAM

Architect: arcDESIGN, Indianapolis, Arcdesign.us
General Contractor: Weddle Brothers Construction, Evansville, Ind., Weddlebros.com
Roofing Contractor: Associated Roofing Professionals, Terre Haute, Ind.
Roof System Manufacturer: The Garland Company Inc., Garlandco.com

Firestone Acquires Silicone Roofing Systems Provider

Firestone Building Products Company LLC has announced its acquisition of Gaco Western, a provider of silicone roofing systems, waterproofing systems and spray foam insulation. The deal, which includes all assets and operations held by Gaco, closed April 3, after a definitive agreement was signed and announced earlier this year.

The acquisition allows Firestone to introduce even more options to customers with Gaco’s silicone and acrylic liquid coatings. The enhanced portfolio creates alternative solutions when full roof tear-offs and rebuilds are not feasible, and it presents contractors with products requiring less labor-intensive installation.

“Combining the best of two brands, Firestone and Gaco, represents an opportunity for growth and long-term value as we aim to create new levels of service and innovation in our industries,” says Tim Dunn, president of Firestone Building Products, Bridgestone Americas Inc. “Operations will conduct business as usual across all teams as we begin bringing our portfolios, employees, best practices and distribution platforms together to continue serving as a total solutions provider for our collective customers.”

In addition to expanding Firestone’s roofing product portfolio with silicone polyurethanes, epoxies and acrylic liquid coatings, the deal offers new positions in commercial and residential sectors with decking and waterproofing products that protect pedestrian surfaces, concrete, metal and plywood, and open- and closed-cell foam products which protect and insulate buildings.

Gaco products will continue to be sold under the Gaco brand and will continue to be made at a state-of-the-art manufacturing, research and development facility in Waukesha, Wis.

Financial details of the transaction are not being disclosed.

ASTM Test Method Prevents Air Leakage, Supports Liquid-applied Polymers

A new ASTM International test method aims to prevent air leakage in and around roofs, helping improve energy efficiency, reduce moisture problems and prevent pollutants from entering a building.

“It is critical that each assembly of the building envelope be investigated for air-leakage performance with appropriate standards,” says ASTM Member Sudhakar Molleti. “What cannot be captured in the material and full envelope air leakage testing—the structural strength and continuity of the air barrier assembly—can be quantified in the assembly testing. To achieve energy efficiency of building and to adapt for climate change, comprehensive data of material, assembly, and full envelope air leakage testing are needed. By quantifying air leakage in roof assemblies, this new standard can serve as a platform for supporting code compliance and for constructing energy-efficient and sustainable roof assemblies.”

Molleti, a research officer with more than 10 years of roof assembly testing at the National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, notes roofing membranes are air impermeable but can be compromised by factors, such as lack of continuity of the membrane seams, improper detailing around rooftop preparations, improper selection of flashing materials and improper connection of roof membranes to the exterior wall barrier.

Specifically, this new test method is a laboratory technique to determine air leakage in low-slope membrane roof assemblies and accounts for the wind fatigue expected during the life span of a roof by simulating negative air-pressure differences.

The new standard (soon to be published as D8052/D0852M, “Test Method for Quantification of Air Leakage in Low Sloped Membrane Roof Assemblies”) was developed by ASTM’s committee on roofing and waterproofing (D08).

In other news, a set of proposed ASTM International test methods will help support the growing number of roofing projects that use liquid-applied polymers. The proposed standard (WK40123, “Test Methods for Sampling and Testing Liquid Applied Polymeric Roofing and Waterproofing Membranes that Are Directly Exposed to Weather”) will help manufacturers; testing labs; and the construction industry as they sample, test and compare products. It is being developed by ASTM’s committee on roofing and waterproofing (D08).

The proposed standard includes ways to test liquid-applied polymeric materials that are cured to form roofing and waterproofing membranes that are directly exposed to all kinds of weather. By their nature, these materials are seamless. They are also useful when working with complex surfaces and custom-fit projects.

ASTM Member Philip Moser notes these membranes have been traditionally used for waterproofing of elevated parking decks, but their use for applications like roofing is quickly rising. Moser, a senior project manager specializing in building technology at Boston-based Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc., says, “Delivery to the exact point of application in relatively small containers makes these products particularly attractive for small rooftop terraces, congested urban areas and roofs that are not accessible by crane where delivery of larger containers would create logistical problems.”

The test methods would be used by manufacturers and testing labs, as well as the people who write specifications that indicate which test methods should be used to evaluate physical properties.

To purchase standards, visit ASTM. org and search by the standard designation, or contact ASTM Customer Relations at (877) 909-ASTM or Sales@ASTM.org. ASTM welcomes participation in the development of its standards. Become a member at ASTM. org/JOIN.

Polyglass USA Celebrates 25 Years of Roofing, Waterproofing Materials Production

Polyglass USA Inc. is celebrating 25 years of producing roofing and waterproofing materials for the North American roofing industry. Polyglass will commemorate this milestone with its customers throughout 2017.

Polyglass is a manufacturer of modified bitumen roof membranes, elastomeric roof coatings and underlayments. Founded in the early 1950s by roofing contractors in northern Italy, Polyglass established its first manufacturing plant in the 1960s serving roofing contractors across Europe. The company grew and expanded operations into the U.S. in 1992 with its first location in Fernley, Nev. By 2006, Polyglass had grown to three US facilities with the addition of plants in Pennsylvania and Florida.

In 2008, Polyglass was acquired by Mapei, a global manufacturer of adhesives, sealants and construction materials for the building industry. Since the acquistion, Polyglass has added a manufacturing location in Arizona, with an additional facility in Texas slated to be operational at the end of 2017. The Polyglass manufacturing facilities are ISO 9001:2008 certified and strategically located to serve its customers.

“Celebrating 25 years of successfully developing and producing roofing solutions that has helped transform the roofing industry would not be possible without our committed employees,” says CEO Natalino Zanchetta. “With a focus on quality, Polyglass has developed solutions for use in every climate and we continue to innovate to meet the changing needs of our customers.”

Since developing its first compound formula decades ago, Polyglass has added hundreds of products that extend the roof-life cycle, help manage building energy loads and enhance building aesthetics. With the launch of patented ADESO Technology, Polyglass provided a way to install modified bitumen membranes. Polyglass also developed patented CURE Technology, a thin film technology applied to membranes during the manufacturing process to increase reflectivity, durability, stain and UV resistance, granule retention and energy efficiency.

As part of its commitment to customers, Polyglass offers continuing education through Polyschool, a two-day training program that teaches best practices in the installation of Polyglass’ commercial and residential products. Polyglass has also developed a customer loyalty program with its Q Rewards program – rewarding its customers for their Polyglass product purchases.

Firestone Acquires Provider of Waterproofing, Spray Foam Insulation Solutions

Firestone Building Products Company LLC (Firestone) has announced that it has reached a definitive agreement to acquire Gaco Western (Gaco), a provider of waterproofing and spray foam insulation solutions for a variety of commercial and residential applications. The acquisition strengthens Firestone’s leadership in commercial roofing and offers positions in residential and commercial building products, reinforcing its commitment to be a leader in the building envelope solution. Firestone Building Products is part of Bridgestone Americas, the largest subsidiary of Bridgestone Corp., a tire and rubber company.

“This acquisition supports our strategic plan to penetrate adjacent product segments,” says Tim Dunn, president of Firestone Building Products. “Adding Gaco’s product portfolio will expand our offering, broaden our customer base, and reaffirm our commitment to being a total solutions provider. We are now also in a position to better capitalize on the demand for liquid coating products and are excited about the opportunity to unearth the value that exists in the combination of the two businesses.”

Financial details of the transaction are not being disclosed. The acquisition is expected to be completed before the end of the first quarter 2017, subject to regulatory approvals and other customary closing conditions.

Founded in 1955, Gaco is privately-owned and headquartered in Seattle. With brands including GacoFlex, GacoRoofFoam and GacoWallFoam, the company produces silicone polyurethanes, epoxies and acrylic liquid coatings for roofs; decking and waterproofing products that protect pedestrian surfaces, concrete, metal and plywood; and open- and closed-cell foam products which protect and insulate buildings. All Gaco products are made at its manufacturing, research and development facility in Waukesha, Wis.

The combination will allow Firestone to provide customers with additional products for their roofing needs. By delivering a repair product at a competitive price point, Gaco’s portfolio of silicone and acrylic liquid coatings offers an alternative for situations when full roof tear-off and rebuild are not an available solution. For contractors, these products allow for less labor-intensive installation, reducing costs. Additionally, the transaction enables Firestone to offer its customers access to Gaco’s waterproofing solutions.

Firestone is a leader within the roofing industry and has a vision for the broader building envelope, combining service, product, and innovation, with a substantial distribution platform. We are excited at the prospects of joining Firestone as it allows us to continue to drive R&D, deliver products to our customers, and offer additional career opportunities to our employees,” says Peter Davis, Gaco chairman and CEO.

Kemper System Will Showcase Liquid-Applied Protective Solutions at IRE

Kemper System America Inc. will showcase a range of cold liquid-applied protective solutions for the building envelope at the International Roofing Expo (IRE) in Las Vegas, March 1-3, and demonstrate product application at booth 217.

Kemper System protects surfaces across the globe. Solutions to be featured at IRE include:

  • Two fully reinforced membrane systems that can transform roof decks into reflective cool roofs, or provide monolithic protection for green roofs, blue roofs, and a range of other projects.
  • Two new coatings systems for protecting surfaces prone to heavy wear such as parking garages, balconies and walkways.

Waterproofing Membrane Systems

The two reinforced waterproofing membrane systems are cold liquid-applied and ideal for cool roof applications:

  • Kemperol AC Speed FR system is a Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA)
  • Kemperol Reflect 2K FR is a low-VOC system

Both are fire rated for Class A assemblies and exceed LEED solar reflective requirements with SRI ratings of 108 and 110, respectively.

Durable Wear Coatings

For protecting parking garages, pedestrian decks, and loading docks, the COLEAN Parking System can withstand deterioration caused by natural elements and vehicular traffic. In addition, the COLEAN Balcony System, which is designed to expand and contract with normal structural movements, protects balconies, terraces, walkways, patios, sun decks, and machine rooms from freeze/thaw damage and chemical exposure.

Kemper System America also offers a way to prolong the life of existing roofs with elastomer-based coating systems, one of four technologies added through the acquisition of STS Coatings Inc. in December.

“Our building envelope solutions go beyond roof waterproofing to make the building specifier’s job easier. These solutions create opportunities for contractors and value for building owners,” says Richard Doornink, president and managing director of Kemper System America Inc.

For over 60 years, Kemper System has led in cold-liquid applied, reinforced roofing and waterproofing, having invented the technology and holding the first patents. Today the company offers a range of building envelope solutions to protect against weather, preserve the integrity of surfaces, and enhance the comfort and value of public buildings and commercial real estate.

Visit IRE booth 217 to learn more, or contact Kemper System at inquiry@kempersystem.net, or call 8(800)541-5455.

Kemper System Announces Acquisition of STS Coatings Inc.

Kemper System America Inc. announces that it is building on its strength in liquid-applied waterproofing with the acquisition of STS Coatings Inc. and its four major brands to address more than waterproofing across the building envelope.

“Specifiers want to work with suppliers that can solve multiple building envelope challenges, including walls and foundations, and this extends our range,” says Richard Doornink, president and managing director, Kemper System America.

“These brands offer cost-performance advantages, and will continue to be available through existing and new distribution channels, including retail. Liquid-applied products are easy to transport to the jobsite, are economic to install, and can be applied to a variety of surfaces.”

  • Wall Guardian Air Barrier – This spray- or brush-applied water-based liquid air barrier system offers three benefits in one — air barrier, water barrier, and vapor retarder. It is for use in cavity-wall constructions, including CMU/brick veneer, steel stud, insulated (continuous insulation), and insulated tilt-up construction.
  • Roof Guardian Technologies (RGT) – These liquid-applied elastomeric roof coating systems help prolong the life of roofs, including metal, smooth-surfaced BUR, polymer-modified asphalt and single-ply roof systems. The RGT line includes 12 products including two Cool Roof rated systems, and two ENERGY STAR certified systems.
  • HeatBloc Ultra Radiant Barrier – This low-emissivity, water-based (low-e) aluminum coating is engineered for attic spaces. Applied to interior underside of the roof deck, it can block over 80 percent of radiant heat to reduce cooling requirements.
  • GreatSeal Construction Sealants – This premium line of caulks and sealants is used on doors and windows, masonry, roofing and siding. All products in the GreatSeal line are 100 percent solids, with no solvents and very low VOCs, and formulated for performance even in damp, dry or cold conditions down to 40F.

Synergies

“There are synergies with distribution and our existing lines, and we intend to build these in the marketplace,” Doornink states. “For example, Roof Guardian Technologies elastomeric coatings now make us competitive on more building envelope projects with a lower price point. In addition, HeatBloc moves us into retail, which creates a trail for other opportunities.”

Doornink says the news is also in keeping with Kemper System America’s vision for 2020. “We intend to continue growing through strategic acquisitions as we become more than waterproofing for our building products customers.”

Kemper System America is a wholly owned subsidiary of Kemper System GmbH & Co. KG | Holländische Straße 32-36 | D-34246 Vellmar. Kemper System is part of the IBG group of Companies, a mid-sized industrial holding company with more than 50 sales and distribution, as well as production companies all over the world.

For more information, visit STS Coatings Inc. or contact Kemper System at inquiry@kempersystem.net, or call (800)541-5455.