Key Priorities for Fire Station Project Include Visual Appeal, Resistance to Algae and Wind

When the Burlington Fire Department decided to replace its aging steep-slope system, the goals included finding a system that would look good, stand up to high winds and resist algae growth.

When the Burlington Fire Department decided to replace its aging steep-slope system, the goals included finding a system that would look good, stand up to high winds and resist algae growth.

The firemen and firewomen of the Burlington Fire Department, located in Burlington, Wash., reportedly respond to about 1,800 service calls a year. The members of the department are on call 24/7, handling a variety of emergencies, both big and small.

Whether it is fighting a fire, performing a search and rescue, or something as simple as retrieving a driver’s keys from the car, the city’s bravest are too busy to have roof issues make their days more difficult. When the fire station began to experience leaks that required countless repairs and patchwork solutions, the City of Burlington knew it was time to replace the entire roofing system and ensure that the firefighters were safe from the elements.

Over the last few years, leaks began to appear more frequently in the fire station’s roof, with the worst leaks occurring in the paramedic’s quarters and in the firehouse’s workout room. The water would drip down on the firefighters and ceiling tiles became discolored, creating an unpleasant appearance throughout the firehouse. The intense winds in the area would also cause the shingles of the roof to become loose and fly off.

“The roof was patched several times over the years. We filled the voids as we went,” says Brandon Bond, a lieutenant on the Burlington Fire Department for the last 10 years. “After a while, the patches and replacements weren’t working and the leaks were getting harder to fix. At that point, we knew it was time to replace the whole roof.”

For their new roof, the city wanted a material that was visually appealing and performed against algae and wind. Also, because this was a city project, they wanted to find a contractor who was nearby and a roofing material that was manufactured locally—all of which showed pride in their community. When they considered the criteria, along with the size of the roof—24,000 square feet—the city chose to go with asphalt shingles because they provided a high level of longevity and durability while keeping it affordable.

Asphalt shingles offered a heavyweight, wind-resistant roofing material with a number of color options, making it the optimal choice among the design team. Wind resistance was an important factor because the old roofing system sustained considerable wind damage. The winds in the area can reach 65-70 miles per hour.

Selecting the Right System

Cascade Roofing Company from Burlington was hired to install the new roof on the fire station. The company has been in business for nearly 30 years and works on both commercial and residential roofing projects. The owner of Cascade, Rick Steiner, explains that asphalt shingles were used on the fire station for a number of reasons.

“Shingles were used because of the different pitch heights of the roof, their affordability and their great look,” Steiner says. “The algae-resistance was also a must. Algae grows like weeds in Washington, due to the moisture in the air and fluctuating temperatures.”

Algae flourishes in humid climates and its spores can be carried by the wind. The temperate but rainy weather found in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. produces an environment for algae to thrive in. While algae is not known to cause damage to roofs, the dark streaks are unsightly.

“Burlington is very wet, whether it’s raining or if we’re dealing with the humidity,” says Lauren Wilkins, a firefighter at the Burlington Fire Department since 2012. “We wanted the new roof to provide some resistance to algae so that it looked good as compared to the other surrounding roofs in the area.”

Cascade used shingle manufacturer PABCO Roofing Products, located in nearby Tacoma, Wash. PABCO’s algae-resistant Paramount Signature Cut Shingle in Oakwood color was selected for the project because it provided exceptional curb appeal. An aggressive modified sealant was used as well as high-wind shingle application—6 nails—to add resistance to wind uplift. PABCO Paramount starter shingles were applied over PABCO Universal Starter to provide a double-layer base. A synthetic underlayment along with an ice and water shield on the leading edges were also used. Shasta HD Ridge was applied to the ridge and hips of the roof to complement the roofline.

The roof system was installed by Cascade Roofing Company using shingles manufactured by PABCO Roofing Products.

The roof system was installed by Cascade Roofing Company using shingles manufactured by PABCO Roofing Products.

Keeping it Local

The City of Burlington was thrilled to choose local companies for the project. The manufacturer, contractor and even the supplier were all located nearby. This provided Cascade an avenue for necessary materials to be delivered quickly, allowing them to stay under budget and ahead of schedule. The project took about two weeks and 230 squares of shingles to complete, which is equivalent to the number of shingles necessary for the company to roof six or seven regular-sized homes.

“It’s easily the biggest shingle job I’ve ever done,” Steiner says. “But the design of the building along with the high-profile look of the shingles made the project look incredible. The city has a roof that’s going to last a very long time.”

Steiner also points out how smooth operations were due to the local theme of the project. “Everything was on-time. The supplier was right across the street and very easy to work with,” Steiner notes. “Even the weather cooperated – it made a potentially difficult project that much easier.”

The firefighters felt the same way. “We thought the hardest thing about the renovation would be continuing our daily operations, but we didn’t run into any problems,” Wilkins says. “They were very friendly and easy to coordinate with when moving equipment. There were no horror stories here.”

Since the renovation was completed, the firefighters are very happy with the new roof. The firemen and firewomen of the Burlington Fire Department can now focus on keeping the residents of Burlington safe.

The unique installation of the roof also earned Cascade Roofing and the fire station project the 2017 Bronze Award in the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study (QARC) Awards Program. Each year, ARMA seeks out the most beautiful, affordable and reliable asphalt roofing systems in North America.

Award-winning projects are selected based on innovation, performance and beauty, and recognize projects that lead the way in areas like weather protection, green roofing or unique utilization of asphalt shingles in a roofing system. ARMA is currently accepting submissions for both low- and steep-slope roofing project installations completed in 2017 for its 2018 awards program. Roofing contractors can submit multiple projects through Dec. 31, and there is no fee to enter.

For more information about asphalt roofing systems, the QARC awards program and more, visit the website.

PHOTOS: JAROD TROW PHOTOGRAPHY

Retrofit Roofing Project Highlights Advancements in Building Materials and Methods

The roof was replaced on Huntsman Corporation’s Advanced Technology Center, an L-shaped, 70,000-square-foot facility housing expensive equipment and research labs. A TPO membrane roof system was installed over high-density polyiso cover board.

The roof was replaced on Huntsman Corporation’s Advanced Technology Center, an L-shaped, 70,000-square-foot facility housing expensive equipment and research labs.

Over the last few decades, computer and scientific innovations have evolved at a furious pace, with new technologies rapidly replacing only slightly older ones. In this race for the latest and greatest, it sometimes feels like the devices in our pockets and controlling our home stereos are from some virtual reality, while the building materials of our homes and workplaces are relics of a bygone age. But, looks can be deceiving, and the polyiso insulation industry is playing a role in evolving our built environment.

For example, many commercial buildings seem only superficially different from those built a generation ago when seen from a distance. But, from behind the glass curtain walls and updated building amenities, we may not notice the disruptive technologies that have substantially improved building systems in recent years. Informed by sophisticated research and utilizing advanced components, cutting-edge building materials are thinner, stronger and more resilient than traditional products. Adopting them in both new construction and renovation can appreciably improve building performance, while also decreasing environmental impact. These products are particularly attractive to forward-looking companies interested in buildings that will prove cost-effective over the long term.

A Case in Point

When the Huntsman Corporation began considering facility improvements for its Huntsman Advanced Technology Center (HATC) in The Woodlands, Texas, they decided to embrace the most innovative materials available. This four-building campus, located about 35 miles north of Houston, serves as the company’s leading research and development facility in the Americas, so it is appropriate that it be built with products as advanced as the technology it houses. Replacing the aging PVC roof on Building 1 was a key element in this upgrade.

After more than two decades of exposure to the Texas heat, the roof was approaching the end of its useful life. With expensive equipment and valuable research in labs throughout the building, Huntsman didn’t want to take any chances in modernizing the L-shaped, 70,000-square foot facility. With the added incentive of receiving the highest-level certification from its insurer, the company decided to remove and completely replace the existing roof with state-of-the-art materials.

Commercial roofs in Texas are required to have an insulation R-value of 20 or higher, so simply replacing the existing membrane and lightweight insulating concrete on a metal deck that the building had used before with the same materials would not have sufficed. In addition, current codes which say that old roofs need to be brought up to current code when doing a tear-off job. After reviewing the options, they chose to install thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) membrane roofing over high-density polyiso cover board.

The polyiso cover boards are lightweight and easy to cut, which reduces both time and labor costs for installation. They add strength and protection to a roofing system, enhancing the system’s long-term performance. They can be shipped with approximately three times more square feet per truckload than gypsum products, so fewer trucks are needed, leading to fuel and transportation savings. Plus, they can be cut without specialized tools and workers don’t have to worry about the dust that is created when sawing, as they would with other types of cover boards. And most importantly, these high-density boards are based on proven technology.

A TPO membrane roof system was installed over high-density polyiso cover board.

A TPO membrane roof system was installed over high-density polyiso cover board.


Drawn to polyiso for its high R-value per inch of thickness, compressive strength, impressive fire-, wind- and moisture-resistance, long-term durability, and low environmental impact, Huntsman partnered with roof mechanics experienced in working with these materials and committed to both safety and quality.

If the original installers of the previous roof 22-years earlier had witnessed this new project, they would have been amazed. Instead of hoisting heavy materials up ladders, pallets are deposited on the roof by crane. Boards are attached with fasteners and plates or foam adhesives to the deck, and robotic welders seal the seams in the TPO membrane.

The new roof is resistant to ultraviolet, ozone and chemical exposure, which contributes to a lifespan of more than 20 years, while being virtually maintenance-free. Workers who access the roof to remove debris from the tall trees on the HATC campus can easily stay on the safety-taped walk pad areas. The roof materials are all recyclable later, leading to a very low environmental impact.

Increasing the thermal resistance to an impressive R-21 for the combined roof system, the building now exceeds local, state and international building codes. This added insulation and the reflective white surface of the new roof are going to lower energy consumption and lead to greater indoor comfort and a decreased load on HVAC systems. The roof is much less susceptible to the mold, mildew, and will help prevent water from pooling and ponding as it did on the old roof.

A new commercial roof is a substantial investment. Luckily, with all the cost savings inherent in both the installation process and the whole-life use of high-density polyiso cover boards, companies don’t have to forego state-of-the-art materials for financial reasons. Factoring in the ease of installation (from cutting to less dust) and weight of the cover boards, retrofitting an older building with updated roof systems can be a win-win for both clients and crews.

PHOTOS: HUNTSMAN CORPORATION

Re-Roofing Project Protects Medical Center’s Critical Interior Space

The medical center is pleased with the decision to use FiberTite to protect their facility and trusts the roof system will be durable and reliable for many years to come.

The medical center is pleased with the decision to use FiberTite to protect their facility and trusts the roof system will be durable and reliable for many years to come.

Maintaining the building envelope is essential to the success of a facility with critical interior space. This is especially true with hospitals and medical centers, where facility managers need to be on top of the building envelope integrity so patients and valuable assets are protected.

When the staff at an acute care medical facility in Florida realized the building’s existing roof was reaching the end of its service life, they knew they had to take action right away. The medical center offers a 24-hour emergency department, surgical services and various other outpatient services, and avoiding interruptions caused by roof leaks was critical. Hospital officials sought out a roofing consultant to offer a recommendation for the best roofing system to protect the facility.

McEnany Roofing, located in Tampa, Fla., has been providing commercial and industrial roofing solutions for more than 27 years. “We worked on the medical facility’s behalf to recommend a roofing system for this environment,” says Mark Sloat, vice president and senior estimator at McEnany Roofing. “We used the services of an engineer to conduct an uplift test to help us determine the best roof to suit their needs.”

Roof Materials

After all the testing and research was complete, McEnany Roofing concluded that a FiberTite Roofing System was the best choice. The proven performance advantages in puncture resistance, durability, wind uplift and severe weather protection supported McEnany Roofing’s recommendation and after careful review of the data, the medical facility agreed. In 2016, McEnany Roofing installed more than 130,000 square feet of Elvaloy KEE membrane on the main hospital and two adjacent medical buildings.

Roof Report

The sensitive environment of the hospital setting also had to be taken into account. The water-based adhesive used to adhere the 45-mil FiberTite Fleeceback membrane on the upper roof of the main hospital helped mitigate odor. Other areas of the hospital had 45-mil FiberTite-SM installed using the mechanically attached securement. Both processes minimized disruption and allowed the medical center to maintain strict standards of patient care during installation. The medical center is pleased with the decision to use FiberTite to protect their facility and trusts the roof system will be durable and reliable for many years to come.

Team

ROOFING CONTRACTOR: McEnany Roofing, Tampa, Fla.
ROOF SYSTEM MANUFACTURER: FiberTite Roofing Systems, Seaman Corp., Wooster, Ohio

Photo: FiberTite Roofing Systems

Shingle Line Adds to Color Portfolio

IKO Dynasty shingles with ArmourZone adds three colors to its color portfolio.

IKO Dynasty shingles with ArmourZone adds three colors to its color portfolio.

The IKO Dynasty shingles with ArmourZone color portfolio provides three additional colors: Driftshake, Brownstone and Frostone Grey.

Contractors can enjoy eleven color blends offered in the IKO Dynasty shingle line, along with ease-of-installation and wind-resistance benefits thanks to the ArmourZone technology.

The three colors are engineered using a color blend technology process that enhances any roofscape.

Coordinating IKO Hip and Ridge Cap Shingles, both standard and high profile (in limited markets), are also available to help protect vulnerable roof areas and to accentuate the roofline. Complementary colors for the three Dynasty swatches include Driftwood (for Driftshake), Dual Brown (for Brownstone) and Dual Grey (for Frostone Grey).

Ease of Installation & Wind Resistance

IKO Dynasty shingles also offer ease of installation thanks to ArmourZone, an enlarged nailing area that makes project installation more accurate.

Two nailing lines that are 1-1/4-inches apart identify the ArmourZone, which is 40 percent wider than IKO’s standard 7/8-inch roofing shingle nailing zones and also guides installers for correct nail placement. Plus, Dynasty shingles require only four nails per shingle for installation compared with the typical six nails for most traditional shingles. Be sure to check your local building code for specific nailing requirements in your area.

Additionally, the reinforced woven band within the ArmourZone helps provide resistance to high winds and carry a 130 miles-per-hour wind limited warranty. The ArmourZone also provides fastening strength over a large surface area of the shingle, helping to resist nail heads from pulling through the shingle in high winds.

For more information about IKO’s Dynasty shingles with ArmourZone and the limited warranty, and its complete portfolio of roofing products and accessories, visit the IKO website.

Flashless Metal Edge Protects the Roof Perimeter

The flashless metal edge system eliminates the need for flashing plies that would ordinarily be installed at the roof’s edge.

The flashless metal edge system eliminates the need for flashing plies that would ordinarily be installed at the roof’s edge.

Garland’s flashless metal edge system eliminates the need for flashing plies that would ordinarily be installed at the roof’s edge, saving time during installation and costs on labor and material. R-Mer Force has re-engineered the way flashing is installed without compromising strength or longevity.
 
A roof’s perimeter is vulnerable to wind damage and moisture intrusion, requiring special details and flashing procedures to protect the building. R-Mer Force is anchored to exterior walls with aluminum anchors, which means there are no penetrations on the roof surface. Fascia cover pieces snap onto installed anchors, completing the installation and blocking out the elements to protect your building. 
 
Thermoplastic elastomer compression seals also contribute to the finish of R-Mer Force. Because the seals keep surface tension balanced, the oil canning effect that plagues other metal edge systems doesn’t affect the level edge surface of R-Mer Force. To complete the finish, customized splice plates make the transition between edge pieces uniform for a finished look. The system is available in a variety of colors to fit any aesthetic goals. 
 
These innovations don’t compromise on the strength and longevity expected from Garland’s metal systems. R-Mer Force meets building code ANSI/SPRI ES-1 requirements for structural integrity and wind resistance, ensuring security. The extruded aluminum anchor was designed and tested to withstand severe wind speeds, keeping the fascia secured. The fascia is available in steel and aluminum options.

ARMA Helps Update Wind-resistance Standard for Asphalt Shingles

DURING THE past year, the Washington, D.C.-based Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has led the process to update the ASTM International wind-resistance standard for asphalt shingles to help ensure that it complies with the latest methods to determine design loads for roofs and cladding used on buildings. ASTM standards are consensus standards that are used around the world to improve product quality and build consumer confidence.

The 2016 version of ASTM D7158 is now coordinated with the American Society of Civil Engineers standard ASCE 7-10, “Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures”, which is the document that the International Building Code relies on for its structural provisions. The ASCE 7-10 standard had significant revisions in wind design. ARMA worked with recognized structural engineers who are leaders in the wind-engineering field and industry stakeholders who provided specific updates to D7158 that ensure consistency with ASCE 7-10. Although the building code includes conversion factors to account for differences between versions of ASCE 7, ARMA and other industry stakeholders recognized the value of correlating D7158 with the latest version of ASCE 7. The updates were balloted and approved via the ASTM consensus process.

“ARMA has always been a leader of progress and innovation in the roofing industry,” says Reed Hitchcock, executive vice president of ARMA. “Spearheading the revision of the test standard that determines wind resistance of asphalt shingles shows ARMA’s commitment to the roofing community, building owners and home-owners alike. We continue to strive to make asphalt the leading roofing technology.”

ASTM D7158-16, “Standard Test Method for Wind Resistance of Asphalt Singles (Uplift Forces/Uplift Resistance Method),” is now available for purchase on the ASTM website. Learn more about ARMA at AsphaltRoofing.org.

Roofing Adhesive Features One-Step Application Process

Helix Low-Rise Adhesive is ready to use from the container, no mixing required.

Helix Low-Rise Adhesive is ready to use from the container, no mixing required.

With a one-step application process, Helix Low-Rise Adhesive from Mule-Hide Products Co. provides adhesion of approved roof insulations, thermal barriers, cover boards and fleece-backed single-ply membranes to a variety of roofing substrates.
 
The polyurethane foam is applied in a single step. Both parts of the adhesive are ready to use from the container – no mixing required – and are applied simultaneously in a 1:1 ratio through a static mix tip. It is applied in continuous ribbons or beads spaced 4, 6 or 12 inches apart, depending on the project and code requirements. There is no overspray, and it cures in minutes.
 
Helix Low-Rise Adhesive contains no volatile organic compounds (VOCs), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or hydro chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs). 
 
It does not require mechanical fasteners, maintaining a puncture-free vapor retarder, preventing thermal bridging and protecting the structural integrity of the roof deck.
 
The bond created by Helix Low-Rise Adhesive provides wind uplift resistance, allowing it to be used on buildings in higher wind zones. In addition, it provides hail resistance when used as an adhesive for fleece-backed membranes.
 
Helix Low-Rise Adhesive comes in cartridge twin-pack tubes or two-tank sets. Both include one container of each of the adhesive’s two components – Part A and Part B. Cartridge twin-packs cover approximately 200-600 square feet of roof and tank sets cover approximately 1,000-3,000 square feet of roof, depending on bead spacing.
 
The cartridges fit most dispensing guns currently available on the market. Tank sets come with a Helix Gun Assembly (25-foot dual-hose with attached spray gun), petroleum packet, wrench, and 10 Tank Static Mix Tips. Contractors need not purchase specialty pumps or spray rigs. No external power source is required to run application equipment.

McElroy Metal’s Shingle Recover System Brochure Is Available for Download

McElroy Metal’s 138T Shingle Recover System brochure is now available for download.

McElroy Metal’s 138T Shingle Recover System brochure is now available for download.

McElroy Metal’s 138T Shingle Recover System brochure is now available for download. The 138T symmetrical standing-seam panel offers ease of installation, the ability to replace individual panels, wind-uplift resistance and improved weather tightness. The system does not require tear-off and disposal of the existing roof or underlayment while yielding reduced utility expenses, leading to a quicker return on investment for the building owner.

The BTI-Greensburg John Deere Dealership Installs Tornado-Resistant Daylighting Systems and Other Sustainable Materials

On the night of May 4, 2007, brothers Kelly and Mike Estes saw their BTI-Greensburg John Deere Dealership obliterated by an EF5 tornado nearly 2-miles wide (according to the Enhanced Fujita Scale, which rates the strength of tornados by the damage caused; view the scale on page 3). Astoundingly, 95 percent of their town—Greensburg, Kan.—was also destroyed that day. The tornado did much more than rip roofs off buildings and toss things around; it turned the entire community into what looked like kindling.

Rarely do communities get hit by an EF5 tornado, which can come about when air masses collide. Sometimes warm, humid air from the Gulf of Mexico rises above drier air from the Southwest deserts in the U.S. This can create unstable conditions resulting in thunderstorms and worse. A strong collision of air masses creates a strong storm. Additionally, wind patterns and the jet stream can magnify the storm, resulting in what people refer to as “the perfect storm”.

After being completely destroyed by an EF5 tornado, the BTI-Greensburg John Deere Dealership has been rebuilt in Greensburg, Kan., in a better, greener way.

After being completely destroyed by an EF5 tornado, the BTI-Greensburg John Deere Dealership has been rebuilt in Greensburg, Kan., in a better, greener way.

Despite the large-scale losses incurred by the entire town, 100 customers and friends of the Estes family showed up the morning of May 5 to help them salvage what remained of their business. Shortly after the tornado disaster, Kansas Gov. Kathleen Sebelius stated her wish that Greensburg become the “the greenest city in the state”.

As part of their commitment to their community, Kelly, Mike and their family decided to rebuild their business in a better, greener way. They wanted the new 28,000-square-foot prefabricated metal building to be the world’s greenest farm-machinery facility; attain a LEED Platinum rating from the Washington, D.C.-based U.S. Green Building Council; and use the least energy possible. One of the most important considerations was using building materials that could withstand future tornados.

DAYLIGHTING

To help achieve LEED Platinum and outlast any future high-velocity winds, they incorporated 12 Daylighting Systems in their retail area’s roof to showcase their merchandise; reduce lighting energy costs; and flood the area with natural light, a benefit for customers and employees.

The Daylighting Systems capture light through a dome on the roof and channel it down through a highly reflective tube. This tubing is more efficient than a traditional drywall skylight shaft, which can lose over half of the potential light. The tubing fits between rafters and installs with no structural modification. At the ceiling level, a diffuser that resembles a recessed light fixture spreads the light evenly throughout the room.

The dome is made from high-quality acrylic resin that is specifically formulated for increased impact strength, chemical- and weather-resistance, and high clarity (a polycarbonate inner dome is used for high-velocity hurricane zones). Domes are engineered to deflect midday heat and maximize low-angle light capture. The tubing is made from puncture-proof aluminum sheet coated with the highly reflective material for maximum light transfer. The units (independently tested by Architectural Testing in Fresno, Calif.) comply with various building codes including the 2009 International Building Code and 2010 Florida Building Code, including high-velocity hurricane zones.

“When our power went out one time for four hours, we were able to keep the shop open and operating due to daylight strategies, which includes the Daylighting Systems,” notes Mike Estes. “We didn’t anticipate this benefit but we’re really happy to have this bonus.”
PHOTO: SOLATUBE INTERNATIONAL INC.

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Shingles in an Open-tooth Design Create a Dramatic Look on Large-scale Roofs

Paramount is the original PABCO Signature Cut Shingle. The open tooth design creates rich depth for a dramatic look on large-scale roofs while its strength and durability provide a functional roof for many years to come.

Paramount is the original PABCO Signature Cut Shingle. The open-tooth design creates rich depth for a dramatic look on large-scale roofs while its strength and durability provide a functional roof for many years to come.

Paramount is the original PABCO Signature Cut Shingle. The open-tooth design creates rich depth for a dramatic look on large-scale roofs while its strength and durability provide a functional roof for many years to come. Paramount features up to a limited lifetime warranty for single family residential structures and a 50-year fully transferable limited warranty for all other structures. All colors are available with Scotchgard Protector, which PABCO Roofing warrants that your roof will resist the black streaks caused by algae for 20 years.

Paramount comes in Antique Black, Driftwood, Oakwood, Pewter Gray, Weathered Wood, Barkwood and Rocky Beach.

Paramount is UL classified to meet ASTM wind resistance standards, UL 790 Class A, Fire Resistance Standard and complies with CSA A123.5, Fiberglass Shingle Standard and ASTM D3018 Type I, Fiberglass Shingle Standard.