Projects: Office

DPR Construction, Phoenix

Eighty-two Daylighting Systems were installed in the renovated 16,533-square-foot building.

Eighty-two Daylighting Systems were installed in the renovated 16,533-square-foot building.

Team

Roofing contractor: Arithane Foam, Corona, Calif.
Architect/engineer: SmithGroupJJR, Phoenix
Daylighting systems distributor: Norcon Industries, Guadalupe, Ariz.

Roof Materials

Eighty-two Daylighting Systems were installed in the renovated 16,533-square-foot building, formerly an abandoned retail boutique at the corner of 44th Street and Van Buren in Phoenix.

“The use of the Daylighting Systems was an integral part of our sustainability and lighting energy savings plans for the renovated space,” says Dave Elrod, regional manager of DPR Construction, Phoenix. “The products are a cost-efficient solution to provide lighting since they nearly eliminate the need for artificial daytime lighting.”

In addition, the roof is composed of foam with an R-25 insulation value (approximately 4-inches thick) over plywood sheathing.

Daylighting systems manufacturer: Solatube International Inc.
Foam roofing manufacturer: Quik-Shield from SWD Urethane

Roof Report

DPR Construction is a national technical builder specializing in highly complex and sustainable projects. In less than 10 months, the design-build team researched, designed, permit-ted, and built a highly efficient and modern workplace with numerous innovative sustainability features.

In addition to natural daylighting, the office features an 87-foot zinc-clad solar chimney, which releases hot air from the building while drawing cooler air in; shower towers that act as evaporative coolers to regulate building temperatures; 87 operable windows designed to open and close automatically (based on indoor/outdoor temperatures); and two “vampire” shut-off switches to keep electrical devices (radios, cell-phone chargers, microwaves) from using plug energy when no one is in the office.

Access to the building was limited during construction. Spray foam roofing, which took about seven days to complete, had to be done in small quadrants because of the tight schedule as work was progressing in the other sections. The roofing workers were challenged by the barrel-shaped roof, which created footing difficulties, and the many penetrations that had to be flashed, including all PV support legs, Solatubes, skylights and HVAC penetrations. Work was completed in the middle of winter, so additional protections and efficiencies were required.

The circa-1972 building has been officially certified as a Net-Zero Energy Building by the Seattle-based International Living Future Institute through its Living Building Challenge program. It also has received LEED-NC Platinum certification from the U.S. Green Building Council, Washington, D.C.

PHOTOS: Ted Van Der Linden, DPR Construction

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A Green Roof Provides Residents of a Senior Housing Complex with an Improved View

The Findlay Teller Apartments provides affordable housing for low-income seniors in the Bronx, N.Y. The complex includes 32 one-bedroom and 131 efficiency units. Its 9,925-square-foot green roof is its most prominent green-building element and gives residents a welcomed view of green space.

Built in 1906, the dilapidated building was revitalized by three local Bronx organizations.

Built in 1906, the dilapidated building was revitalized by three local Bronx organizations.

“Many green roofs are on top of buildings where no one can see and enjoy them. The Findlay Teller green roof, particularly the sections installed on the terrace level and second-floor roofs, has many windows that look out on the [green roof sections],” says Antonio Freda, owner of Bronx-based Freda Design Associates Ltd., the architect for the apartment building’s renovation. “In fact, 90 percent of the apartments have a view of the green roof.”

RESTORING A NEIGHBORHOOD LANDMARK

Located at 1201 Findlay Avenue in the Morrisania neighborhood of the Bronx, the community landmark has a long history. The building was constructed in 1906. The Daughters of Jacob, a non-profit service organization, originally used the building as a hospital and nursery facility. It was renovated in 1920. The east and west wings were added in 1952.

Converted to subsidized senior housing under the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Section 202 program in 1978, and known as Findlay Plaza, the building deteriorated over the years. By December 2007, the apartments had a lowly score of 34 out of 100 on HUD’s Housing Quality Standards. Buildings must score at least 86 for their conditions to be rated healthy and safe. Eventually, HUD foreclosed on the property.

In 2009, three local organizations, the Citizens Housing and Planning Council, the Local Initiatives Support Corp. and the Belmont-Arthur Avenue Local Development Corp. (BAALDC), worked together to win the support of the building’s tenants and neighborhood leaders to acquire and rehabilitate the property.

Roofing workers spread the growing media on the roof.

Roofing workers spread the growing media on the roof.

BAALDC, which strives to prevent the deterioration, blight and abandonment of at-risk housing in the Bronx, established the Findlay Teller Housing Development Fund Corp. (Findlay Teller HDFC) to take on the challenge of assembling financing and renovating the building.

“The building was in a very sad state of disrepair,” notes Joe Cicciu, executive director of BAALDC and president of Findlay Teller HDFC. “We put together $20 million in funds from many different sources, including a major grant from JPMorgan Chase, to save and rehabilitate the building.”

GREEN BUILDING AND A GREEN ROOF

Notias Construction Inc., Flushing, N.Y., was the general contractor for the project. The firm managed the renovation according to Enterprise Green Communities Criteria, a program of Columbia, Md.-based Enterprise Community Partners, a non-profit dedicated to creating opportunity for low- and moderate-income people through affordable housing in diverse, thriving communities. Required by the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development, the criteria define standards for green-building practices applicable to affordable housing. Thus, the renovation included a new structural roof with two layers of insulation, high-efficiency boilers, replacement windows and new energy-efficient lighting. In addition to the green roof, permeable pavement in the parking area reduces stormwater runoff.

PHOTOS: XERO FLOR AMERICA

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Downtown Storm-water Management

Founded in 2002, Xero Flor America (XFA) is the official U.S. distributor of the Xero Flor Green Roof System. XFA has made its home in Durham, N.C., since 2006 when the company relocated its national headquarters from Lansing, Mich. In July 2012, it moved locally into renovated offices in The Republik Building, located at 211 Rigsbee Avenue in downtown Durham’s historic district.

Originally constructed in the 1940s for the Durham Insurance Service Co., The Republik Building is perhaps known to local history buffs as the home of WSSB radio. Robert Shaw West, chairman and CEO of The Republik, a local firm offering brand strategy and communication services, purchased the property from the city of Durham. He renovated the outmoded offices into a more contemporary, open and collaborative work environment in 2006. XFA decided to become more connected to the business community downtown and searched for offices in the historic district—ideally in a building where the company would have the opportunity to showcase its green roof system. West had space available on the second floor for XFA to lease.

Completed in February 2013, the 2,343-square-foot Xero Flor green roof atop The Republik Building is the first green roof installed on a building in Durham’s downtown historic district.

Completed in February 2013, the 2,343-square-foot Xero Flor green roof atop The Republik Building is the first green roof installed on a building in Durham’s downtown historic district.

“It was serendipity,” West says. “Xero Flor was looking for offices downtown, and we had space. Plus, we had to reroof our building last year. Since we needed a new roof, it was an ideal time to also consider adding a green roof, which supports our commitment to sustainability.”

Completed in February 2013, the 2,343-square-foot Xero Flor green roof atop The Republik Building is the first green roof installed on a building in Durham’s downtown historic district.

Going Green on the Roof

In addition to the standard building-permit process, putting a green roof on a historic building required additional review and approval.

According to Anne Kramer, urban designer with the Durham City-County Planning Department, except for certain minor items, such as repainting a previously painted surface, most changes to building exteriors within an official historic district require a Certificate of Appropriateness (COA). The Durham Historic Preservation Commission oversees the process locally.

The commission’s goal is to ensure preservation of the architectural character of the historic district’s buildings and, therefore, had to ensure adding a green roof to the building would not alter or disrupt the appearance of downtown Durham. Demonstrating a green roof would not be visible from the street level was especially important. With the COA from the preservation commission, XFA and The Republik had the green light for the green roof. But first Baker Roofing, Raleigh, N.C., installed the new structural roof.

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