Contractual Risk Shifting, Workers’ Compensation and You

During the process of negotiating construction contracts, contractors often use certain clauses to shift the risk of loss onto subcontractors who may have less bargaining power. How do they do this? Most commonly through the use of indemnity and waiver of subrogation clauses. While these clauses apply in a variety of situations, they are particularly concerning with regard to workers’ compensation insurance.

All states have mandatory workers’ compensation statutes. These statutes make employers strictly liable for employee injuries on the job. Strict liability means liability without fault. Therefore, an injured employee of a subcontractor can recover damages from the subcontractor’s workers’ compensation carrier even if a third party is 100 percent at fault for the injury.

What Is Subrogation?

Subrogation arises when an innocent party incurs damages attributable to the fault of another. This most commonly applies when an insurance carrier pays an insured loss and subrogates to the rights—or “stands in the shoes”—of the injured party in recovering against the responsible party. This doctrine is based on equitable principles, primarily to prevent the at-fault party from escaping liability. Makes sense, right? Then how does a subcontractor waive subrogation?

Here’s a sample waiver of subrogation provision:
Subcontractor hereby waives all right of recovery against the Contractor, the Owner and their respective officers, directors, employees, agents and representatives with respect to claims covered by insurance obtained pursuant to insurance requirements under this Subcontract. The Subcontractor agrees to cause its Workers’ Compensation, General Liability and Automobile Insurance carrier to waive their rights of subrogation against the Contractor, Owner and their respective officers, directors, employees, agents and representatives.

Here’s an example:
A subcontractor’s employee is injured by the sole negligence of the contractor. The subcontractor’s workers’ compensation carrier pays out statutory damages to the injured employee. Pursuant to the waiver of subrogation clause, the subcontractor and its carrier have no right to recover the losses from the contractor.

What is the practical effect? The subcontractor suffers the consequences of the contractor’s sole negligence. How? The subcontractor’s experience modification rate (EMR) goes up. What else goes up with the EMR? Premiums!

What Is Indemnification?

Indemnification requires one party to pay damages to another, sometimes without regard to who was actually at fault. These types of clauses often include language requiring the subcontractor to “defend and hold harmless” the contractor, which puts the additional burden on the subcontractor of incurring fees and expenses for the contractor’s legal defense. There are generally three types of indemnity clauses: broad, intermediate and limited.

A broad indemnity clause requires the subcontractor to pay loss or damage regardless of who is at fault, even if the damage is caused by the sole negligence of the contractor. This is the most onerous type of indemnity clause because it shifts the entire risk to the subcontractor.

Here’s a sample broad indemnity provision:
Subcontractor shall indemnify, defend and hold harmless the Contractor, Architect and Owner against all liability claims, judgment or demands for damages and expenses, including, but not limited to, reasonable attorneys’ fees, arising from accidents to persons or property arising out of or resulting from the performance of the work.

An intermediate indemnity clause requires the subcontractor to pay loss or damage for its own sole or partial negligence. Some intermediate indemnity provisions require the subcontractor to pay the entire loss or damage while others only require the subcontractor to pay its pro rata share of the loss or damage.

Finally, a limited indemnity clause only requires the subcontractor to pay loss or damage that is the sole responsibility of the subcontractor.

How do indemnity and subrogation interplay? When the subcontract has abroad indemnity clause and a waiver of subrogation clause.

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Asphalt-based Low-slope Roof Systems Provide Long-term Service Life

Asphalt-based roof systems have a long-standing track record of success in the roofing industry. In fact, asphalt-based roof systems have more than a century of use in the U.S. Building owners, roofing specifiers and contractors should not lose sight of this fact. It is important to understand why asphalt roofing has been successful for so long. Asphalt roofs demonstrate characteristics, such as durability and longevity of materials and components, redundancy of waterproofing, ease and understanding of installation, excellent tensile strength and impact resistance. Each of these characteristics helps ensure long-term performance.

Using a composite built-up/ modified bitumen roof system provides redundancy helping ensure durability and longevity. Surface reflectivity and a multilayer insulation layer provide excellent thermal resistance. Quality details and regular maintenance will provide long-term performance. PHOTO: Advanced Roofing

Using a composite built-up/
modified bitumen roof system provides redundancy helping ensure durability and longevity. Surface reflectivity and a multilayer insulation layer provide excellent thermal resistance. Quality details
and regular maintenance will provide long-term performance. PHOTO: Advanced Roofing

There are two types of asphalt-based low-slope roof systems: modified bitumen (MB) roof systems and builtup roof (BUR) systems. MB sheets are composed primarily of polymer-modified bitumen reinforced with one or more plies of fabric, such as polyester, glass fiber or a combination of both. Assembled in factories using optimal quality-control standards, modified bitumen sheets are manufactured to have uniform thickness and consistent physical properties throughout the sheet. Modified bitumen roof systems are further divided into atactic polypropylene (APP) and styrene butadiene styrene (SBS) modified systems. APP and SBS modifiers create a uniform matrix that enhances the physical properties of the asphalt. APP is a thermoplastic polymer that forms a uniform matrix within the bitumen. This matrix increases the bitumen’s resistance to ultraviolet light, its flexibility at high and low temperatures, and its ability to resist water penetration. SBS membranes resist water penetration while exhibiting excellent elongation and recovery properties over a wide range of temperature extremes. This high-performance benefit makes SBS membranes durable and particularly appropriate where there may be movement or deflection of the underlying deck.

BUR systems consist of multiple layers of bitumen alternated with ply sheets (felts) applied over the roof deck, vapor retarder, and most often insulation or coverboard. BUR systems are particularly advantageous for lowslope applications. The strength of the system comes from the membrane, which includes the layers of hot-applied bitumen and the reinforcing plies of roofing felt.

FACTORS FOR LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE AND SERVICE LIFE

It is important for building owners and roof system designers to recognize the principles of long-lasting, high-performance roof systems. Roof longevity and performance are determined by factors that include building and roof system design, job specifications, materials quality and suitability, application procedures and maintenance. The level of quality in the workmanship during the application process is critical.

Longevity and performance start with proper design of the asphalt-based roof system. Proper roof system design includes several components: the roof deck, a base layer supporting a vapor retarder or air barrier when necessary, multi-layer insulation and a coverboard, the asphaltic membrane, appropriate surfacing material or coating, and the attachment methods for all layers. Roof consultants, architects and roof manufacturers understand proper design. Roof design needs to follow applicable code requirements for wind, fire and impact resistance, as well as site-specific issues, such as enhanced wind resistance design, positive drainage and rooftop traffic protection. Roof designers can provide or assist with the development of written specifications and construction details that are specific to a roofing project for new construction or reroofing.

Low-slope asphalt-based roof systems are redundant; they are multi-layered systems. BUR systems include a base sheet, three or four reinforcing ply sheets and a surfacing, either aggregate (rock) or a cap sheet. MB sheets include one and sometimes two reinforcing layers and are commonly installed over a substantial asphaltic base sheet. Modified bitumen roofs can be granule surfaced, finished with reflective options or coated after installation. Aggregate, granules, films and coatings add UV protection, assist with fire resistance, provide durability to the roof system and can improve roof aesthetics.

An asphaltic cap sheet with a factory-applied reflective roof coating is installed over three glass-fiber ply sheets and a venting base sheet. The reflective coating reduces heat gain, and insulating concrete provides a stable substrate and high R-value. PHOTO: Aerial Photography Inc.

An asphaltic cap sheet with a factory-applied reflective roof coating is installed over three glass-fiber ply sheets and a venting base sheet. The reflective coating reduces heat gain, and insulating concrete provides a stable substrate and high R-value. PHOTO: Aerial Photography Inc.

Coverboards provide a durable layer immediately below the membrane, are resistant to foot traffic and separate the membrane from the thermal insulation layer. Protecting the thermal insulation helps maintain the insulation R-value as specified and installed.

Asphalt is a durable and long-lasting material for roof membranes and flashings. Asphalt is stable under significant temperature swings and can be highly impact resistant. Various reinforcements can be used to increase an asphaltic membrane’s durability. All asphaltic membranes are reinforced, during installation (BUR) or the manufacturing process (MB membranes). Polyester reinforcement has excellent elongation, tensile strength and recovery. It provides good puncture resistance and stands up well to foot traffic. Glass fiber reinforcement resists flame penetration and provides excellent tensile strength and dimensional stability.

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Pay Per Click Marketing for Roofers

Homeowners never know when Mother Nature is going to cause significant damage to their roof. Every house is only one bad storm away from thousands of dollars in repairs. In today’s market the majority of homeowners turn to Google, Bing and other search engines to find roofers that can come to the rescue.

I specialize in Pay Per Click (PPC) management. PPC is a form of Internet advertising in which advertisers pay a fee each time their ad is clicked.

PPC can be a powerful tool to generate new business. It is the only way to guarantee that your website appears when a potential customer searches for a term relevant to your business. However, it can also be an expensive waste of money if your account is setup incorrectly. Whether you decide to manage your PPC campaign in-house or outsource it, you need to follow these tips to make the most from your marketing budget:

Set up the Campaign Correctly

The first tip is also the most important. Make sure your campaign is set up correctly so every single website visitor you get is a realistic prospect for your services. PPC can be a black hole if you are paying the search engines for irrelevant terms, like “roofing equipment”. Also, if your account is not set up correctly, you could be paying for clicks that are completely out of your service area.

Remember, even if you get a bad click, Google still gets paid! Make sure your campaign is laser-focused, so that the keywords, location, device and time of day is most likely to turn into a sale.

Highlight Offers and Specials

For all of your ads you need to make sure you highlight specials and features about your company that will separate you from your competitors. The basic fundamentals are always going to remain the same, but you need to give customers a reason they should be excited to do business with you.

Pay Google and Bing Directly

If you outsource your PPC, it is best to work with a company that has the search engines charge you directly. PPC agencies charge a separate management fee for their services. If you pay a lump sum, then the PPC company does not have to tell you how your budget was divided. Keep in mind the average PPC management fee is about 20 percent of your total spend on Google, Bing and other search engines.

Also, if a PPC agency spends less on clicks for a particular month, then you should be the one to keep the money!

(PPC requires an in-depth knowledge of Google AdWords. It is deceptively easy to create a campaign in-house but I recommend working with an expert to make sure you are maximizing your marketing budget.)

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An ERA Study Proves EPDM Easily Lasts More than 30 Years

More and more building owners are seeing the light: Roof systems based on historical in situ performance for more than 30 years are the best roof system choice to benefit the environment. EPDM roof membrane has been utilized as a roof cover for more than 40 years, and there are numerous examples of ballasted roofs greater than 30-years old still performing. New seaming technologies, thicker membrane and enhanced design are creating roof systems with projected 50-year service lives. EPDM roof covers’ physical characteristics have changed little in 30 years, and because potential for 50-year-plus service life is possible, they are a solid choice of design professionals, building owners and school district representatives who truly desire a roof system that benefits the environment.

PHOTO 1: This ballasted 45-mil EPDM roof system has been in service for 32 years.

PHOTO 1: This ballasted 45-mil EPDM roof system has been in service for 32
years.

In 2010, the Washington, D.C.-based EPDM Roofing Association (ERA) was determined to answer the question: “How long can an EPDM roof perform?” Consequently, roof membrane samples from five roof systems with a minimum age of 30 years were obtained for testing of their physical properties. The physical and mechanical properties evaluated (using relevant ASTM standards) were overall thickness, tear resistance, tensile set, tensile strength and elongation, and water absorption. The results were positive, showing that even after 30 years of infield exposure nearly all the physical characteristics of EPDM membrane meet or exceed ASTM minimums. But the question of how long EPDM roofs could last remained. Thus, a second phase of testing was undertaken.

These properties were studied for “as received” and “after heat-conditioning” for up to 1,500 hours at 240 F. Results showing how these membranes performed before and after heat-conditioning are presented with the intent of defining characteristics for long-term service life of roof membranes.

TESTING PHASE ONE

Ethylene-propylene-diene terpolymer (EPDM) has been used in waterproofing and roof applications for more than 45 years in North America. Introduced into the roofing market in the 1960s, EPDM grew, especially after the 1970s oil embargo, to be a roofing membrane choice for new construction and roofing replacement projects. EPDM has achieved long-term in situ performance in part because of its chemical structure, mostly carbon black, which resists ozone and material decomposition, as well as degradation caused by UV light, which is the No. 1 degradation element to roofing materials exposed to the sun (see photo 1). The carbon black also provides reinforcement, yielding improved physical and mechanical properties.

Long-term performance of roof-cover material is dependent upon its resistance to the combined effects of ponding water, UV radiation, ozone, heat and thermal cycling. Geographical location can exacerbate or reduce the impact of climatic factors. In ballasted systems, the ballast acts to provide protection from the UV rays and minimizes the effect of climatic influences.

ERA’s study had three specific goals:

    1. Verify the long-term performance characteristics of EPDM membranes over 30 years. (At the time of the study, the only in situ membranes that were around for 30 years were 45-mil EPDM membranes. Currently 60- and 90-mil are the standard choices. It is assumed that results for the 45-mil material can be prorated for the thicker membrane.)

    2. Scientifically validate the empirical sustainability experiences.

    PHOTO 2: This recently installed, ballasted, 90-mil EPDM roof was designed for a 50-year service life.

    PHOTO 2: This recently installed, ballasted, 90-mil EPDM roof was designed for a 50-year service life.

    3. Create a foundation for specifier-to-owner discussions in regard to long-term service life. Five roofs, four ballasted and one fully adhered, with in situ service lives approaching or over 30 years were identified and samples were taken. All roofs were fully performing without moisture intrusion.

The samples were sent for testing per ASTM D4637 for:

  • Elongation
  • Tensile strength
  • Thickness
  • Factory seam strength (psi)

PHOTOS: HUTCHINSON DESIGN GROUP LTD.

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Essential Ladder Rack Features

As a roofing professional, you rely very heavily on your ladder for work. Keeping that ladder secure during transportation should be a priority. If you recently purchased a new work vehicle or a new ladder and are in the market for a secure storage solution for your ladder, it’s important to understand all of your ladder rack options before you make an investment.

At first glance, a ladder rack is just that—a piece of equipment that attaches to the roof of your van or truck to aid in the transportation of your ladder. But did you know that different ladder racks have different elements that may benefit you as a roofing professional?

Take a look at some of the most important features to consider when shopping for a ladder rack for your work vehicle:

  • Ergonomics: You use your ladder on a daily basis, if not more! Overtime, all of that loading and unloading can really take a toll on your back, shoulders and overall body. Even if you’re in fantastic physical shape, if you twist wrong or lose your balance while unloading a ladder, you could get seriously injured. An ergonomic ladder rack is ideal for professionals just like you. These types of ladder racks allow users to lower the ladder down to an easily reachable height. No more straining to reach your ladder!
  • Security: When you choose a ladder rack, you will want to make sure that it’s one that will keep your ladder secure during transportation. The last thing you want is to deal with a lawsuit because your ladder fell off your vehicle’s roof while driving. Look for ladder racks with lockable, gripping mechanisms to ensure safe transportation of your ladder.
  • Durability: No one wants to invest in a ladder rack just to have it rust out in a few years. Like with most products, the cost of a ladder rack is often directly correlated with its quality. A high-quality ladder rack may have a high sticker price but, in the long run, its durability and reliability will prove to be more cost-efficient. However, if you’re just looking for a short-term solution, a cheaper ladder rack maybe a better fit for your situation.
  • Versatility: Sometimes you may need to transport things other than your ladder on the roof of your work vehicle because of their size. If this is the case, you may want to consider a roof storage solution that has the ability to secure ladders and cargo. Look for a utility rack that features heavy-duty tie-down cleats to secure loads on the roof while traveling. Ladder racks come in all shapes and sizes with many different features available. So if you’re in the market fora new ladder rack, do your homework before you buy to ensure you’re getting the right product for your trade.

It Is the Roofing Industry’s Responsibility to Help Clients Recognize the Importance of Roofing Insulation

In many cases, commercial roofing insulation is the most expensive component of a new roof assembly. Often, building owners do not understand how the insulation selection made today is really a long-term financial decision. The advice a roofing contractor provides to a building owner regarding insulation is critical to helping the building owner make the correct decision from a technical-roofing perspective and business-decision perspective. Many questions we typically hear from prospective low-slope commercial roofing clients revolve around the insulation to be utilized in their new roof system.

  • What is the best type of insulation?
  • How much insulation is most appropriate?
  • What are the advantages of certain types of insulation?

As with everything else in roofing, there is no “one size fits all” insulation solution. There are endless permutations of building use, geography, investment-time horizon, and other factors that can and should influence the amount and type of insulation used in roof systems. However, in most cases, we’ve found that polyisocyanurate insulation is the optimal insulation for a roof system.

Polyisocyanurate insulation provides a substrate for the waterproofing membrane and thermal resistance.

Polyisocyanurate insulation provides a substrate for the waterproofing membrane and thermal resistance.

THE ADVANTAGES OF POLYISOCYANURATE

From a purely technical roofing perspective, polyisocyanurate insulation in a low-slope roof assembly performs two basic functions. First, it provides a substrate for the waterproofing membrane. Second, the polyisocyanurate insulation provides thermal resistance.

There are all sorts of ancillary benefits and purposes for the polyisocyanurate insulation, but the primary function of the insulation is simply to provide the substrate for the roof system and to complete the thermal envelope on the top of the building.

Much like concrete work, or any other kind of construction for that matter, the performance of a roof system is 100 percent correlated to the substrate upon which it is placed. The math is simple: the better the substrate, the better the roof will perform.

The current industry standard for polyisocyanurate insulation comes with an organic facer and a published density of 20 psi. The standard polyisocyanurate insulation is the most widely specified and utilized insulation in the industry by a wide margin.

Standard polyisocyanurate insulation is widely used, frankly, because it works well. Polyisocyanurate provides several attributes that make it the first choice in most commercial roof assemblies.

PHOTOS: BLOOM ROOFING

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Galvalume-coated Metal Roofs Will Last at Least 60 Years with Minimal Component Repair

The term “infrastructure sustainability” continues to gain importance because of rapidly increasing building infrastructure components around the country needing major repairs and/ or replacements. Consequently, roof maintenance or replacement materials and methods must last at least 60 years; consider LEED v4 from the Washington, D.C.-based U.S. Green Building Council. For more than 30 years, millions of square feet of Galvalume-coated roofs have resisted the atmospheric conditions to which they are exposed with little or no maintenance and are well prepared to continue protecting building interiors for more than 30 additional years. Material science and professional project engineering and installation prove Galvalume-coated metal standing-seam roofs will perform for that period of time.

This is a nine-year-old painted Galvalume roof in Alabama.

This is a nine-year-old painted Galvalume roof in Alabama.

MATERIAL SCIENCE

The first standing-seam metal roof was introduced by Armco Steel Corp., Middletown, Ohio, at the 1932 World’s Fair in Chicago. Armco Steel ceased doing business many years ago, but its standing-seam metal roof design has been adopted by all manufacturers in today’s commercial metal roofing market. The second longest-lasting introduction into this market was in the early 1970s when Bethlehem, Pa.-based Bethlehem Steel introduced a Zinc/Aluminum coating—now known as Galvalume—for carbon-steel metal roofs. This coating, applied to both sides of the steel coil, has been successfully used for the majority of metal standing-seam roofs ever since.

Since Galvalume was introduced, there have been several evaluations, reports and predictions as to how this product would “weather” the test of time. In 2012, the Chicago-based Metal Construction Association (MCA) and Olympia, Wash.-based Zinc Aluminum Coaters Association (ZAC) commissioned a study to perform forensic tests at 14 existing Galvalume standing-seam metal roof sites throughout the country in varying climates and precipitation pH. The average age of these roofs was more than 30 years at the time of testing.

Initially, the sites were selected based on temperature and humidity zones throughout the U.S. As the field results were processed, however, it became apparent the expected lives of these roofs were directly dependent on the precipitation pH levels with very little correlation to temperature and humidity. The building sites chosen were located in the following states:

  • Massachusetts (2 sites)
    This Galvalume roof in Missouri is nine years old.

    This Galvalume roof in Missouri is nine-years old.


    Ohio (3 sites)
    South Carolina (2 sites)
    Georgia (1 site)
    Colorado (1 site)
    New Mexico (1 site)
    Arizona (1 site)
    Oregon (1 site)
    Wyoming (2 sites)

The study was directed by MCA and three independent consultants and their firms, which managed and performed the field work: Rob Haddock of Metal Roof Advisory Group, Colorado Springs, Colo.; Ron Dutton of Ron Dutton Consulting Services LLC, Annapolis, Md.; and me and my firm Metal Roof Consultants Inc., Cary, N.C. This group, plus Scott Kriner, MCA’s technical director, authored the actual report, which was issued by MCA and ZAC in November 2014 and is available online.

The team harvested and analyzed actual field samples of Galvalume-coated metal standing-seam roof panel materials and sealants and examined all the individual roofs’ ancillary components. Finally, it created an experienced assessment of the roofs’ conditions and associated costs to replace.

PHOTOS: METAL ROOF CONSULTANTS INC.

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Lessons Learned During a Merger

In August 2014, I purchased the assets of a fourth-generation, 133-year-old roofing contracting company with which I had been competing locally for a few years. As a relatively new contractor in the area (I had been in business just under nine years), I wanted a larger share of the commercial roofing market. The clients I hoped to inherit with this acquisition would help me to accomplish that goal.

I had no formal business training, nor knowledge of how to make such a merger work. I started my company with very little industry experience back in 2005; I had a working knowledge of roofing and a desire to be my own boss. Things had gone well, so I trusted that my instincts would guide me through the merger. I was operating on nothing more than a gut feeling that this merger would be a good thing and a blind assumption that I would be able to handle whatever challenges might come my way.

I began the dialogue with the company’s owner in early 2013 and it took until August 2014 to close the deal. There were plenty of challenges created by this process—definitely some things I handled well and some I did not.

The primary goal of this acquisition was to retain the company’s customer base, thus growing my own. Relationships were in place that went back years, even generations, and maintaining those relationships was of utmost importance. I had a plan in place to personally visit with or reach out to all of these customers within the first two weeks. I thought this would be one of the main challenges—certainly the most important thing to get right—but, surprisingly, it was one of the easiest things to achieve. The previous owner assured these customers I would continue to take care of them well and I think these customers’ trust and loyalty already was so solid that the accounts transferred over to me almost without question. As planned, I personally met most of my new customers within the first couple weeks, continued to serve their needs with the same people and took care of them with the same high level of service to which they had become accustomed. I am proud to say, after six months, we have retained 100 percent of these customers.

I am fond of saying, “I don’t know much, but I know exactly what I don’t know.” It’s the tenet to which I attribute what modicum of success I have had. I knew that I did not know how to manage a process like this! It was definitely a good move on my part to work with a consultant. It did not answer all the questions, nor did it eliminate all mistakes, but the insight and advice of someone who had been through similar processes was invaluable.

Before we closed on the deal, I told myself that despite what problems, issues or frustrations might arise, I would treat the first five months as an observational period rather than a time to implement changes. I was patient and held true to that timeframe. Trust takes a while to establish and people take a while to know. I am glad I waited to learn what I needed to know before making any significant changes.

The biggest challenge the merger created was in dealing with the significant increase in my employee count and all the associated human-resource issues that resulted. I had kept my business pretty light on hourly employees in the field, whereas the company I purchased had close to 30 full-time roofers. I had written an employee handbook prior to the merger but many of the policies had not yet been questioned or tested. Of course, in the first few days after the merger, I had a wave of guys coming at me with issues and problems with the new systems to which they would be subjected. I modified a few policies based on legitimate concerns and to ease the transition while I held firm on others. I should have had clearly defined and time-tested policies in place, so I would have been better prepared for the questions I was asked.

In hindsight, I think the biggest mistake I made was to agree to keep this sale completely confidential until the deal was confirmed and I had officially taken over. This meant the first time I met any of the employees they were already on my payroll. There had been no opportunity to meet existing employees, interview the office staff, or gain any insight into systems and processes prior to the day of the merger. I basically had to jump right in! That could have been avoided and would have prevented a lot of stress and at least one early layoff I had to make.

I should definitely have hired, if only temporarily, an additional office person to assist with the mountain of paperwork that was created. We used a Small Business Administration loan to finance the purchase, which added significantly to an already overwhelming workload. A backlog of paperwork was created that took a few months to sort out.

Although I do not consider the merger process completed, we are definitely over the hump and, despite a few challenges, it has turned out as I hoped it would. Our commercial revenues have increased as forecast and I feel good about the fact that, had I not purchased this business, the employees I gained would be unemployed right now. Instead, they are part of a growing company that aims to provide long-term security for them and their families.

Twice in the same day earlier this month I was asked, “What one thing have you learned from the process of buying another business?” I did not have a clue how to answer that question. Certainly I have learned a great many individual lessons and become the wiser for it, but I’m not sure how to boil it down to one thing. I guess it can be summed up with my favorite cliché:
“That which does not kill you makes you stronger.” Mistakes are inevitable, and they are good. If you are afraid to make them, you will accomplish nothing. You will learn way more from one mistake than you will from 10 good decisions. People will not notice your mistakes nearly as much as you think. So don’t hesitate; make the call; learn from it if you can; and move on.

On a personal note, I owe a very heartfelt and big thank you to Horace Thompson King III (Tommy) for being such a pleasure to work with and for making a difficult process much easier than it could have been.

Metal Roofing Underlayments Protect Structures in Hawaii

The newly constructed Safeway Shopping Center, Honolulu, happens to be the largest Safeway on the Hawaiian Islands. It contains a parking garage below—in part, because of its location in a densely populated neighborhood.

The underlayment manufacturer worked on and approved a design in which the underlayment could be installed directly on the metal deck.

The underlayment manufacturer worked on and approved a design in which the underlayment could be installed directly on the metal deck.

ITS METAL ROOF WAS INSTALLED by Kapolei, Hawaii-based Beachside Roofing, which has been doing business in Hawaii for more than 25 years. The company, which installs all kinds of roofing and waterproofing systems, specializes in high-rise buildings, resorts and complex projects.

The 20,000-square-foot metal roof on the Safeway store had to meet strict color requirements in keeping with the Safeway brand. The color of the roof is Gargoyle, which is a greenish-brown.

The metal roofing was designed to be installed over corrugated 20-gauge steel decks. The underlayment manufacturer worked on and approved a design in which the underlayment could be installed directly on the metal deck.

The metal deck (HSB-36SS type) was installed with the wider corrugations facing up and parallel to the eaves (horizontally). The self-adhering underlayment also was installed horizontally, and the metal panels were then attached to the horizontal corrugations of the deck using panel clips and self-drilling fasteners penetrating through the underlayment into the flattop of the corrugations of the steel deck.

The self-adhering underlayment also was installed horizontally, and the metal panels were then attached to the horizontal corrugations of the deck using panel clips and self-drilling fasteners penetrating through the underlayment into the flattop of the corrugations of the steel deck.

The self-adhering underlayment also was installed horizontally, and the metal panels were then attached to the horizontal corrugations of the deck using panel clips and self-drilling fasteners penetrating through the underlayment into the flattop of the corrugations of the steel deck.

The walkability of the underlayment was an important factor, considering that the roof slope was 4 inches per 12 feet in some places. Also, the 120-day exposure allowance for the underlayment was reassuring, though not necessary for this project.

The metal roofing system included many architectural elements, such as canopies, penthouses and mansards. It covers not just the Safeway supermarket, but also other shops in the Safeway Shopping Center. The way the metal was used architecturally really dressed up the exterior of the project.

Secondary Water Barrier

A self-adhering metal roofing underlayment, like the one on the Safeway Shopping Center, perfectly complements metal roofing panels. The underlayment provides a watertight secondary membrane while the metal panels serve as the primary roof to protect against wind-blown objects and UV radiation. If the primary roof is damaged, the secondary roof acts as the water barrier.

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Perseverance Will Keep You Ahead of the Competition

I have never climbed a ladder to inspect a job my company bids on, but that has never been an obstacle to winning roofing contracts. I know a great many roofers who have climbed the proverbial “ladder” to the top of a company they now run from the windowed corner office. A lack of hands-on experience has never been an obstacle for me. In fact, just ignore that I’m a woman working in a predominately male construction industry and I will also ask you to disregard that I’m paralyzed from the chest down. That has not been an impediment either—as difficult as that may be to believe.

No, I have not allowed this long list of potential challenges to be an obstacle (for long!) to my business success. Doing so would just not make good business sense.

When I see an obstacle in business, it’s a boulder in the road and my business sense shifts into full gear: Get over it, around it, smash through it or phone a friend with a crane. I never choose another path. I never give up. I simply don’t allow an obstacle to loom larger than my own determination.

The unwavering willingness to “get the job done” is a common thread I share with many hard-working roofers. However, there is a secret weapon that separates those who marginally succeed and those who are, well, let’s just say “comfortably successful”. I call it perseverance.

Many industry people are silently nodding their heads in agreement saying to themselves, “yeah, that’s me”. But are you too comfortable? It takes more than true grit to persevere in the highly competitive roofing business world of today.

Not only do we face the ever-present competition, there are increased regulations, greater safety standards, high costs for workers’ compensation, not to mention the shrinking pool of qualified professional roofers. We have a lot that challenges us!

Today, perseverance will cement your future success because if you don’t stay ahead of the curve, boulders, like the newest technology, higher industry standards in energy efficiency, new and improved environmentally responsible products and guaranteed safety standards, will stop you. These boulders require greater perseverance, as does meeting customer demands for knowledge and understanding their needs.

To persevere in the roofing business, you have to continue to challenge your team (and yourself) at every turn. Encourage learning and invest in employee training and professional development. As a business owner, I take the lifelong approach to learning in my business. When I had questions and was hungry to learn more about how to run a successful business, I reached out to the community for answers. I discovered allies, like The Women’s Business Development Center that provides workshops, business counseling, networking and access to knowledge that empowered me. No matter where you are in business, you have to keep learning and growing to persevere. Even the largest of boulders look small in the rearview mirror once you have overcome them.

In 1999, I was a young sailor in the U.S. Navy when Hurricane Floyd blew into Virginia where I was stationed and hurled me off a balcony that was just 1-story up. That gust changed my physical world forever. But I had something that storm could not steal from me: perseverance—a willingness to overcome challenges and a commitment to succeed. There are blockades up for each of us, but there are also ways around them, over them and through them if you refuse to accept failure as an option.

My military training has always helped me to stay “mission focused” with a commitment to excellence. The Navy also gave me a strong work ethic and the ability to work under pressure. It taught me to put an emphasis on teamwork and gave me the leadership skills to build a great business. I seek out opportunities to not only learn and grow, but also to become involved in communities of knowledge, such as The Bunker, the nation’s first veterans incubator for small businesses.

Although being a woman- and service- disabled veteran-owned business can bring advantages over many competitors, I still have to earn each and every opportunity. We have been successful at this by building relationships with our customers and earning their trust by performing projects on time, on budget, and with the quality and safety expected. In addition, just as importantly, we bring determination, knowledge and truckloads of professionals who gladly climb all kinds of ladders for me.