Malarkey Roofing Products Eases Access to Product Resources with New Website Design

Malarkey Roofing Products unveiled a new website design the beginning of November that focuses on ease of use paired with icon based navigation. The new look comes on the heels of multiple product additions from the company this summer, including the new Windsor heavyweight designer shingle as well as an expanded low slope roll roofing product line. These new product additions are now seamlessly integrated into the web design with easy access to product resources.

Among the updates to the Malarkey website are the incorporation of icon images with familiar features from the previous website, including areas tailored to both homeowners and roofing professionals. Quick navigation buttons on the homepage allow users one-click access to the shingle design center and purchase locations, as well as recent news and events. Industry professionals will notice low slope product information can be found as both individual product listings as well as system requirements, to allow for easy access to information to fit individual workflows. The warranty center has also seen an update with a streamlined submission process.

“The new website updates are a springboard for our continued growth of the Malarkey online presence in 2015,” says Katherine McConnell, Marketing Manager at Malarkey Roofing Products. “We are excited to offer these updates and look forward to continuing to build our communications with our customers in the year to come.”

Asphalt Roofing Products Provide a Historic Mansion with Modern Performance Without Sacrificing its Classic Curb Appeal

Historic renovations can pose many challenges to roofing contractors. But when done correctly, a renovation on a classic home maintains the structure’s unique style, provides modern performance and even helps to preserve the rich history of an area. This kind of challenge was presented to Highland, Md.-based Certified Inc. when the roofing company was called upon to install a new roof on a historic mansion in Laurel, Md. By choosing the right roofing materials and utilizing proper techniques, the contractor was able to successfully preserve the home’s Victorian appearance and character using today’s safer, more affordable and reliable products, while also meeting the requirements of the local Historic District Commission.

Formerly known as the Phelps mansion, this Victorian-style house was built in 1888.

Formerly known as the Phelps mansion, this Victorian-style house was built in 1888.

A STORIED PAST

Formerly known as the Phelps mansion, this Victorian-style house was built in 1888. The mansion was the home of Edward Phelps, who served as the first mayor of Laurel. Throughout his seven terms in office, Phelps modernized the rural community by overseeing the addition of electric street lights; brick-paved roads; a telephone system; and a railroad that connected Laurel to Washington, D.C.

Jim Lessig, Certified’s project manager, was immediately drawn to the project when it was referred to him by a previous customer. “I was very interested in the project due to the historic nature and elaborate architecture of the home,” he says. “It wasn’t the largest project of the year for us, but definitely the most interesting and intricate.”

The Phelps mansion is located in the Historic District of Laurel, an area that is part of the original town. In the 1970s, a Historic District Commission was established to ensure the preservation of homes and businesses and keep the area’s small-town charm. When it came time to install a new roof on the mansion in June 2013, the homeowners worked with the commission to receive approval on building materials and roofing techniques based on a set of guidelines drafted by the organization.

Sunny Pritchard, coordinator for the Historic District Commission, describes the mansion as a magnificent old home that “sits on a sweeping piece of land and looks grand and proud with its high roof lines, gables and big open porches.” To Pritchard and the rest of the commission, it was imperative that the roof retained the home’s noble, Victorian look.

AN INTRICATE ROOF

Certified was faced with a historic challenge: How could it imitate the look of the home’s original slate roof while providing the safety and durability of today’s products? The answer came in the form of asphalt shingles, which were selected for the renovation and were approved by the historic commission.

The roofing contractor chose asphalt shingles because they were able to mimic the historic look of the original slate tiles while providing modern performance and reliability.

The roofing contractor chose asphalt shingles because they were able to mimic the historic look of the original slate tiles while providing modern performance and reliability.

“We chose to use asphalt shingles because they were able to mimic the historic look of the original slate tiles while providing modern performance and reliability,” Lessig notes. “The commission approved the shingle because in their view it gave an authentic slate look that maintained the house’s turnof- the century appearance.”

The chosen shingles are individually colored using precision color technology which allows a roof to maintain the color, contrast and authentic look of natural slate. Natural slate is expensive and takes a specialized labor force to install because the process is an art form. Natural slate can also be a heavy product and breakage can occur when you install it. Asphalt shingles provided a great value for the project, while mimicking the look and tone of slate from the curb.

Contractors used a combination of low- and steep-slope materials on the roof, and added built-in copper gutters to really make it stand out. The end result was a roof that is beautiful and durable. The home retains its ability to transport passersby back into a time of horse-drawn carriages, top hats and hoop skirts.

A CELEBRATED PRESENT

Since the installation, the Phelps mansion’s new roof has gained national attention. In February, the historic home received one of the asphalt roofing industry’s top honors—the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study Awards (QARC) Bronze Award. The annual QARC awards program is run by the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA), Washington, D.C., and recognizes roofing projects that demonstrate the beauty, durability, reliability and affordability of asphalt-based roofing products.

the historic home received one of the asphalt roofing industry’s top honors—the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study Awards (QARC) Bronze Award.

The historic home received one of the asphalt roofing industry’s top honors—the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study Awards (QARC) Bronze Award.

The Bronze Award recognized the contractor’s choice of an asphalt roofing product that was easy to work with and provided a safe working environment while successfully replicating the 19th century look and feel of the home.

Because of Certified’s excellent work and the unique products used for the project, this historic mansion will continue to represent the image of the original Laurel district and help preserve the area’s history for many more years to come.

“I would have loved to be one of the preserved boards in this house so I could have recorded the happenings throughout the years,” Pritchard notes. “That is what old homes have, a history of happenings, and if you let the roofs and boards decay and rot and eventually fall down, all of that history goes with it. We want to preserve both—the boards and the history.”

ROOF MATERIALS
Highland Slate shingles: CertainTeed Corp.

Learn More about Asphalt Shingles
To learn about the color process and how asphalt shingles are made, check out this video from the Washington, D.C.-based Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association.

Learn about ARMA and the QARC awards program.

PHOTOS: EMERY PHOTOGRAPHY

Roof Bracket Allows Staging of Materials without Covering Anchor Screws

Acro Building Systems' Johnny Jack roof bracket

Acro Building Systems’ Johnny Jack roof bracket

The Johnny Jack roof bracket’s patent-pending design provides a better platform for staging materials on steep-slope roofs. Made in the U.S.A. by Acro Building Systems, the roof bracket is designed to stage materials on architectural roofing, including metal shingles, slate, tile and asphalt, while never covering the anchor screws. It features a 5 1/2-inch surface clearance, and is ideal for working around dormers. Operational dimensions are 7 by 1 foot and the bracket folds to 48 inches for storage. The bracket, which weighs 14 pounds, is powder coated safety yellow and spans 6 1/2 feet.

TAMKO Now Produces Heritage IR Shingles in Phillipsburg, Kan.

TAMKO Building Products has begun production of its popular Heritage IR shingles at its Phillipsburg, Kan., manufacturing facility.

“It’s exciting for us at Phillipsburg to be producing Heritage IR,” said Travis Moore, general manufacturing manager at TAMKO Phillipsburg. “We are pleased to help provide additional distribution options for TAMKO customers.”

Reinforced construction enables the Heritage IR shingles to meet the UL 2218 Class 4 impact resistance rating at the time of manufacture. The UL 2218 Class 4 impact resistance test involves dropping a 2-inch steel ball onto a shingle from a height of 20 feet. Other shingles may crack or rupture during the test. Heritage IR shingles on the other hand, have met the test requirements for withstanding the impact.

“Heritage IR from Phillipsburg will be distributed throughout the U.S.,” said TAMKO’s Vice President of Sales and Marketing Stephen McNally. “We’re excited that we will be able to ship orders from Phillipsburg.”

Heritage IR shingles feature the same natural beauty that has made the Heritage series such a popular choice among homeowners. Naturally deep shadow lines portray the look of real wood shakes, and six attractive color choices enable owners to find the perfect complement to their home. The colors include Olde English Pewter, Rustic Black, Harvest Gold, Thunderstorm Grey, Natural Timber and Weathered Wood.

All Heritage shingles come with a Better-Than-“Lifetime” Limited Warranty, offering more upfront protection, which covers both material replacement and labor costs. See TAMKO’s limited warranty for complete details.

Seal of Approval: How to Make the Most of Asphalt-shingle Sealants

Extreme weather events, such as the wide temperature swings during the recent winter and hurricanes that afflict coastal regions, have increased consumer demand for reliable and high-performance roofs. Asphalt-shingle roofs have been proven to provide the protection homeowners need, thanks to the material’s durability and longevity.

Many asphalt shingles rely on built-in sealants to provide a solid installation. This sealant material is an asphalt-based, heat-activated, viscous bonding material, which retains adhesion in difficult weather conditions, after the initial bonding of the shingles has occurred. The sealant will fuse the asphalt shingles together when each course is properly attached to the roof deck and previous courses.

IMAGE: Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association

Click to view a larger version of this image. IMAGE: Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association

The bonding sealant is factory-applied on the front or back side of the shingle, depending on the manufacturer’s design. Heat from the sun activates and softens the sealant, initiating the bonding process. After the bonding of the shingle sealant, the shingles provide a home with superior wind-resistance.

If not installed correctly, the sealant will not be able to do its job, which could result in shingle blow-offs and other performance issues. For the roofer, shingles that are not properly installed and allowed to bond could mean an unwanted call back to the job site. The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) recommends contractors follow these essential steps to ensure asphalt shingles are installed properly the first time and that sealant adhesion is not impeded:

Scheduling: If an asphalt-shingle installation takes place in cold or windy weather, it could impact the ability of the sealant to cure. The sealant cannot bond in cold weather, and the wind could shift the shingles and break the bond before it has a chance to complete the process. Follow manufacturer instructions for cold-weather installation or plan for projects when weather conditions are more suitable.

Roof Deck: Making sure the substrate and roof deck are not damaged or deteriorated is key to maximizing the potential of the asphalt-shingle sealant. If these elements are overlooked, the shingles will not have a solid base for fastener attachment, and the sealant between the shingles could be less effective.

Underlayment: Proper installation of an approved underlayment will provide the appropriate surface for shingle installation and will help manage water. Ice-barrier underlayment materials, compliant with ASTM D 1970, are recommended for use in northern climates where accumulation of snow or ice on the roof is likely. The ice shield provides extra protection from the potential for water damage; this is especially important on reroofs of older homes where the placement or quantity of attic insulation allows heat to flow to the roof.

Accessories: Roofing accessories, such as flashings at penetrations, valleys and changes in direction of the roof, are essential to making sure the sealant can do its job. Roofers should select approved accessories, whether they are drip edges, ridge vents or other architectural details.

Nailing: The actual attachment of the asphalt shingles is where a roofer has the most control over the installation process. It is important to make sure shingles are attached to the deck with the proper type, size and quantity of nails, as well as in the precise location required. Make sure the nails are in the right place by driving them in the indicated “nailing zone.” Always ensure nails used in laminated shingles are driven through the double-thickness overlap area.

Selecting a shingle that meets or exceeds wind-speed requirements in local building codes will help a roof covering withstand windstorms and protect a home. Further, roofers should always follow all building codes and manufacturer installation requirements for shingle applications.

Asphalt shingles are manufactured to provide homeowners with beautiful, affordable and reliable protection for their homes. It is up to the installer to ensure the sealants can do their job by making sure other facets of the proper installation process are followed.

GAF to Air National Commercial During Duck Dynasty Feb. 19

GAF is excited to announce the inclusion of a national television commercial highlighting GAF Master Elite Contractors as well as GAF Premier Roofing Dealers and Pro-Grade Master Distributors during the Feb. 19 episode of the top-rated show, Duck Dynasty.

Airing on A&E on Wednesdays at 10 p.m. EST, Duck Dynasty is a record-breaking reality show that follows the lives of the Robertson family, who run a family-operated duck call business, Duck Commander. The show has broken several ratings records—last season’s premiere drew 11.8 million viewers, making Duck Dynasty the most-watched nonfiction cable series in history.

“Airing this commercial builds not only the GAF brand but also the brands of our contractors and distributors,” explains Paul Bromfield, senior vice president of marketing and business development at GAF. “This truly demonstrates our commitment to investing in our brand for the benefit of our customers. Airing during a top show with such high viewership supports our position as the industry’s premium brand, helping our customers to create pull-through sales.”

IKO Launches Video Showing Time-lapse Installation of Cambridge Shingles versus Competitor Shingles

IKO recently uploaded a new video to the company’s YouTube channel. The video, titled “Time & Material Study: IKO vs. Competitor” is narrated by IKO’s Manager of Sales & Contractor Development John DeRosa who sets the scene in a suburb of Toronto. He explains there’s nothing special about the roof; it’s about 10 squares and has a pitch of approximately 9:12.

What is special is the side-by-side video of time lapse photography as the same roofing crew installs a competitor’s product and IKO’s advantage-size Cambridge shingles. A counter keeps track of how much time has elapsed as well as how many shingles, nails and total bundles were used.

Even with a 7-minute break, the time needed for the crew to install IKO’s shingles on the entire roof surface is nearly 30 minutes shorter, requiring fewer bundles of shingles and nails. The real “advantage”, DeRosa explains, is how IKO’s advantage-sized shingles put contractors in a more favorable cost position, offering them the potential for higher profits.

The video also shows the beauty of IKO’s Cambridge HD Sedona shingles. The company introduced its “Nature’s Accents Collection” of premium architectural laminated asphalt shingles in 2013. The collection currently includes five color blends made possible with IKO’s patented color blending technology and named for the national parks and landscapes that inspired them: Sedona, Glacier, Appalachian, Biscayne and Pacific Rim.

DeRosa says: “With their high-definition profile and truly striking color blends, Cambridge HD shingles are quickly proving popular among homeowners and contractors. As this new video clearly shows, the ‘IKO Advantage’ is realized by the contractor needing to install fewer bundles on a project. Less bundles means lower material costs, less labor to complete the job and a better bottom line for the roofer. In today’s competitive market, contractors need every possible advantage. And this is a HUGE one.”

Comments Sought on PV Racking Criteria for Asphalt Shingle Roof Integration

The Center PV Taskforce is releasing the first public draft of PV Racking and Attachment Criteria for Effective Asphalt Shingle Roof System Integration for an initial round of public comment. The first draft has been prepared by the PV Taskforce.

The Center PV Taskforce will accept public comments until 8 p.m. EST on Friday, Feb. 14, 2014.

The document is intended to enhance collaboration between key stakeholders from the solar and roofing industries, and accelerate the deployment of rooftop-integrated solar. Members of the solar industry and other interested parties are encouraged to submit comments and engage the Taskforce in future stakeholder discussions. Taskforce members also will accept comments from the at-large community and consider those comments within internal stakeholder discussions.

Directions for submitting public comments:

  • Download a copy of PV Racking and Attachment Criteria for Effective Asphalt Shingle Roof System Integration.
  • All comments shall be submitted no later than 8 p.m. EST, Friday, Feb. 14, 2014.
  • All comments shall be submitted using the Center PV Taskforce online survey form.
  • Additional details can be found on the first page of the criteria document.

If you have questions, please contact James Kirby, (202) 380-3371.

Next Generation Solar Roofing System

CertainTeed Corp.'s Apollo II next generation solar roofing system

CertainTeed Corp.’s Apollo II next generation solar roofing system

CertainTeed Corp. has introduced its Apollo II next generation solar roofing system featuring integrated photovoltaic (PV) panels that combine greater efficiency and improved aesthetics with easier wiring installation. Featuring 54-watt monocrystalline panels, Apollo II is lightweight, durable, resistant to wind uplift, and can easily be integrated into an existing roof or with the installation of a new roof that combines solar panels and asphalt shingles.

Like its predecessor, Apollo II fully integrates with roofing shingles for a clean, seamless appearance not found with rack-mounted systems. Each slim, 12-pound module features 14 high-efficiency monocrystalline silicon solar cells. Its low profile design does not require structural reinforcement or evaluation, and the sleek black frame, cells and backsheet visually blend with surrounding shingles. The enhanced product also features an open space under the modules to allow for easier electrical wiring. New water channels and raised fastener locations further improve roof deck integrity.

The Apollo II system is offered in pre-engineered kits containing all components necessary for installation. Modules are Class A fire rated and meet UL 790 requirements. Apollo II is also rated for wind resistance up to 110 mph and loads up to 250 lbs per square foot. In addition, the product is backed by the industry’s only warranty for both electricity output and installation workmanship. Apollo II qualifies for a 30 percent federal tax credit and may be eligible for state rebates and incentives. Additional incentives may also be available through local utility providers.

CertainTeed offers a powerful portfolio of photovoltaic roofing systems, including, Solstice rack-mounted, high-performance monocrystalline panels featuring one of the best ratios of energy per area and PowerMax premium class, copper-indium-selenium (CIS) thin film rack mounted panels for residential and commercial applications. Designed to meet the demands of sustainable construction and replacement roofing, these products leverage next generation technology to generate unrivaled performance without compromising aesthetics.

Shingles Feature Oversized Dimensions

Atlas Roofing's "Built with HP Technology"

Atlas Roofing’s “Built with HP Technology”

Atlas Roofing Corp. has added its “Built with HP Technology” stamp to Pinnacle Pristine, StormMaster Slate and StormMaster Shake shingles. HP Technology features oversized dimensions, which translate into faster installation and less labor. It offers 1 1/4-inch-wide nailing, which ensures layers of shingles are accurately and securely fastened. FASTAC sealant lines adhere quickly and ensure a strong, long-lasting seal. HP Technology also provides shingles with a 130-mph-rated wind warranty with a standard four-nail application.