Building to Last With Asphalt-Based Roofing

The property owner of this building opted for a BUR/modified-bitumen hybrid system with reflective white coating. Photos: Johns Manville

The advantages of a built-up roofing (BUR), modified bitumen, or hybrid roofing assembly include long life, a variety of maintenance options, and outstanding puncture resistance. This durability means property owners will spend less time worrying about fixing leaking roofs and the associated hassles — lost productivity, disruption in operations, slips and falls, repair bills, and other liabilities.

Recommending clients install a roof system that gives them the best chance of eliminating unproductive distractions is a good business decision for design/construction professionals. A more durable roof will enable property owners to focus on making profits instead of dealing with the aftermath of a roof leak.

“I have no problem endorsing asphalt-based roofing,” says Luther Mock, RRC, FRCI and founder of building envelope consultants Foursquare Solutions Inc. “The redundancy created by multiple plies of roofing is really what sets systems like BUR and modified bitumen apart.”

One can argue BUR’s closest cousin — the modified bitumen (mod bit) assembly — is actually a built-up roof made on a manufacturing line. The reality is the plies of a BUR create a redundancy that can help mitigate any potential oversights in rooftop workmanship.

BUR systems are offered in a variety of attractive and reflective options with a proven track record of performance. Photos: Johns Manville

“I’ve replaced BURs for clients I worked with 30 years ago,” says Mock. “We recently replaced [a BUR] specified in the early 1980s. And the only reason was because some of the tectum deck panels had fallen out of the assembly. Meanwhile, the roof was still performing well after 30 years.”

According to the Quality Commercial Asphalt Roofing Council of the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA), one of the main drivers of the demand for BUR systems is the desire of building owners for long life cycles for their roofs.

“A solid core of building owners and roofing professionals in North America continue to advocate asphalt-based roofing systems because of their long lives,” says Reed Hitchcock, ARMA’s executive director.

Benefits of Asphalt-Based Roofing

Over the years, asphalt-based roofing assemblies have earned a reputation for reliability with building owners, roofing consultants, architects, engineers, and commercial roofing contractors. The original price tag tends to be greater than other low-slope roofing options, but these assemblies offer competitive life-cycle costs. BUR enjoys a track record spanning more than 150 years; it provides a thick, durable roof covering and can be used in a broad range of building waterproofing applications.

An aerial view of a reflective roof membrane. Photos: Johns Manville

Available as part of fire-, wind-, and/or hail-rated systems, BUR and modified bitumen assemblies offer proven waterproofing capabilities, high tensile strength, long-term warranties, and a wide choice of top surfacings (including ‘cool’ options). Their components include the deck, vapor retarder, insulation, membrane, flashings, and surfacing material. The roofing membrane can be made up of a variety of components, including up to four high-strength roofing felts, modified bitumen membranes (hybrid systems) and standard or modified asphalt. Hot-applied asphalt typically serves as the waterproofing agent and adhesive for the system.

The roofing membrane is protected from the elements by a surfacing layer — either a cap sheet, gravel embedded in bitumen, or a coating material. Surfacings can also enhance the roofing system’s fire performance and reflectivity ratings.

Another surfacing option is gravel, commonly used in Canadian applications where the existing roof structure can handle the extra weight. There are also several smooth-surface coating options, the most popular of which are aluminum or clay emulsion products offering greater reflectivity than a smooth, black, non-gravel-surfaced roof. These reflective roof coating options are typically used in warmer regions when required by code. Reflective white roof coatings are also becoming more popular.

Cold-Process BUR

Cold application of BUR has provided an alternative to traditional hot-applied systems for more than 48 years. The term ‘cold-applied’ means the BUR roofing system is assembled using multiple plies of reinforcement applied with a liquid adhesive instead of hot asphalt. These cold adhesives are used between reinforced base/ply sheets to provide a weatherproof membrane.

The owner of this shopping mall chose BUR primarily due to its redundancy. Multiple plies of roofing can provide extra insurance against water intrusion. Photos: Johns Manville

In BUR cold-process roof systems, manufacturers typically require that only fully coated, non-porous felts (such as standard base sheets) are used as base and ply sheets. Generally, an aggregate surfacing or a coating is then applied over the completed membrane to provide surface protection and a fire rating for the roof system.

“In the re-roofing market, we’re definitely seeing more cold-applied systems being specified, particularly with modified bitumen,” says Mock. “It’s a natural alternative when a building may be occupied during the reroofing process and hot asphalt is not an option.”

Adhesives can be manually applied with a squeegee, brush, or spray application equipment. When numerous roof penetrations or rooftop access become issues, manual application of adhesives is usually the best option. Proper coverage rates are vital to a successful, long-term, cold-applied roof system. Both spray and manual application methods require the proper amount of adhesive material be installed. If too little adhesive is applied, there is a potential for an improper bond to be formed between the felts. If too much is applied, then the potential for longer setup times and membrane slippage is increased. Additionally, ambient temperatures must be 40 degrees Fahrenheit (5°C) and rising before installation. This limits, but does not preclude, use of cold-process BUR in much of the northern United States and Canada.

“I’m also comfortable specifying BUR, because I’m confident I will have a seasoned contractor on the job,” says Mock. “The commitment in terms of skilled labor and equipment is simply too great for these contractors to be first-timers.”

Flashings are another critical component of every roofing system, particularly in cold-weather applications. Four-ply BURs use modified bitumen flashings almost exclusively. These membranes are predominantly styrene butadiene styrene (SBS)-modified and offer greater elongation in frigid climates where it counts most — at the interface of the roof system with other building components.

Use of a modified-bitumen base ply is one way of handling general flashing requirements, although modified bitumen cap sheets are more common.

BUR Repair and Maintenance

Like all roof systems to some extent, the life expectancy of a BUR system depends on the property owner’s commitment to routine maintenance. All roof systems can benefit from an owner willing to undertake a proactive management plan. BUR installed over an insulation package lends itself well to non-destructive testing in the future (e.g., infrared) as a means to maximize service life.

“Asphalt roofing systems have the potential for a very long life, and preventive maintenance is the key to realizing that potential,” says Hitchcock.

Non-gravel BUR surfacing options include aggregate, a mineral surface cap sheet, or a smooth, surface-coated membrane. Photos: Johns Manville

The goal is for problem areas to be detected and fixed before they develop into leaks. Inspections can reveal potentially troublesome situations, such as a loss of gravel surfacing, which could lead to felt erosion or brittleness. Less commonly, punctures and cuts to the membrane can occur, so it is wise to remove sharp objects and debris from the roof. Clogged drains or poorly sealed flashings also present problems that are repaired easily. The effects of chemical exhausts on roofing materials should also be monitored.

Preventive maintenance actions can help catch problems before they damage larger areas of the roof system. Inspections should be performed not only on aging roofs, but also on newly-installed roofs to guard against errors in installation, design, or specifications.

BUR and modified bitumen also have a long history of proven performance in the northern United States and Canada, where snow and ice buildup are common. Perhaps more than any other roof membrane, the BUR system shrugs off minor abuse.

BUR has proven to be a low-maintenance roofing system, and it can also be effectively repaired when needed. This means property owners can usually get more life out of a BUR. The ability to enhance the performance of existing BUR membranes with coatings, mod bit cap sheets, or flood coats of asphalt explain the long service lives of these systems in demanding applications.

“Property owners rarely have to replace a four-ply BUR until it is absolutely, positively worn out,” says one roofing contractor who asked to remain anonymous. “Based on experience, these asphalt-based systems ‘hang in there’ longer than less-robust roof options.”

When BUR Is Not the Best Option

There is no roofing product solution that will fit every building specification, and that certainly holds true for BUR. Probably more than any other roofing system (except spray polyurethane foam), the built-up roofing application is more of a skill than a science. As alternative systems have been introduced into the market, the job of finding experienced BUR contractors has become more difficult. This is especially true for the hot mopping of multi-ply BUR systems.

BURs are labor intensive and their installed cost will fluctuate with crude oil prices. However, as oil prices have continued to fall, BUR manufacturers have enjoyed the lowest asphalt pricing since the 2008-09 recession. (The price of oil peaked at about $117 a barrel in September 2012 and is $50 a barrel at this writing.) Typically BUR manufacturers will pass on a portion of these savings to their customers.

BUR has always held up well in life-cycle cost analyses. However, if a roof is not expected to last 20 years or more, it usually does not make sense to specify a premium four-ply BUR.

On larger projects, gravel-surfaced BURs are typically not practical from a cost standpoint unless a source of gravel is available locally. Projects where roof access is difficult often present challenges when roofing kettles are used. And despite the preponderance of low-fuming asphalts and kettles, re-roofing occupied buildings is often unacceptable to neighbors and/or the property owner.

Built-up roofing systems have sufficient strength to resist normal expansion and contraction forces that are exerted on a roof; however, they typically have a low ability to accommodate excessive building or substrate movement. Rephrased, if the roof must be used to “hold the walls” together or if the use of “loose-laid insulation” has a benefit, then a traditional three- or four-ply built-up roofing system is not a good choice.

A built-up roof typically provides high tensile strength with low elongation. Guidelines about where expansion joints should be installed in the roofing system should not be ignored by the designer. These guidelines include installing expansion joints where the deck changes direction, approximately every 200 feet (61 meters), although many consider that this dimension can be expanded for single-ply roofing membranes; where there is a change in deck material; and, anywhere there is a structural expansion joint, etc. Based on these requirements, on some projects it simply isn’t practical to use a BUR.

BUR materials must be kept dry before and during installation to prevent blistering in the roof system. Proper storage is the key: Do not overstock the roof; use breathable tarps to cover material on the roof; store material on pallets to minimize the possibility of material sitting in water; and store rolls on-end to prevent crushing. In general, polymeric single-ply membranes like TPO (thermoplastic polyolefin) are less susceptible to storage issues.

Many roof consultants and product manufacturers clearly state that there should be no phased construction of a built-up roof. If phasing is required, then a BUR should not be specified. This is a clean and simple rule to understand; if the roof being constructed is a four-ply BUR, then only as much insulation should be installed as can be covered the same day with all four of the plies in the built-up roofing membrane. Phased construction of a built-up roof greatly increases the potential for blistering of the membrane and does not allow for the total number of plies to be installed in a shingled fashion. Phased application contains other perils, such as roofing over a small amount of overnight precipitation or dew that, even with the best of intentions, can cause harm.

As stated above, costlier modified bitumen materials should be specified for flashings and to strip in metal. Stripping in two plies of felt will most likely result in splitting at the joints in a gravel stop because the two-ply application cannot accommodate the movement in the edge metal. On new or existing buildings where significant expansion/contraction is expected, a TPO, PVC or EPDM roof membrane can save the property owners money and eliminate premature roof failure due to roof splitting.

Conclusion

Manufacturers across North America are making asphalt roofing systems like BUR better and more versatile for architects, builders, contractors, roofing consultants, and building owner/managers. Thanks especially to the addition of polymers that add stretch and strength, architects can now specify a commercial, low-slope roof as part of a multi-ply BUR system any way they want it — hot, cold, torch, or self-adhered (hybrid BUR) — to meet the individual low-slope roofing project’s needs.

Most importantly, asphalt-based roofing products offer exceptional life-cycle cost performance. They have proven to be reliable, easy to maintain, and are trusted to perform exceptionally well in extreme weather conditions.

ARMA Honors Top Asphalt Projects With QARC Awards

The QARC Gold award was presented at the International Roofing Expo in New Orleans, where Imbus Roofing received a $2,000. Pictured are Bob Gardiner, CertainTeed; Steve Sutton, Imbus Roofing; Andrew Imbus, Imbus Roofing; Tom Smith, CertainTeed and Ron Gumucio, ARMA.

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) recognized a historic music hall, a home with a roof built to withstand high-wind events, and a museum dedicated to the United States’ fight for independence as 2017’s top asphalt roofing installations. ARMA’s annual Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study (QARC) Awards Program awarded the projects that exemplify the most beautiful, affordable and reliable asphalt roofing systems in North America.

Imbus Roofing Co. Inc. received the Gold QARC Award for its new roof installation on the 225,000 square-foot, 139-year-old Cincinnati Music Hall. The Kentucky-based contractor installed designer asphalt shingles to replicate the Music Hall’s slate tile roof, while also providing crucial durability against Cincinnati’s tough climate.

Reliant Roofing Inc. was honored with the Silver QARC Award for its completion of Topsail Residence, a 10,600-square-foot asphalt shingle roofing system designed to endure high-wind events in Ponte Vedra, Florida. This high-performance roofing system not only provided the homeowners with a durable option, but also a visually stunning roof for years to come.

The Bronze QARC Award was given to Thomas Company Inc. of Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, for its low-

slope installation on Philadelphia’s Museum of the American Revolution. Designed to achieve LEED Gold certification, the project featured a high-quality modified bitumen roof membrane to prevent water penetration and create a more stable surface for the facility’s vegetative roof.

According to ARMA, the 2018 QARC Award program received some of the most impressive and innovative submissions of asphalt roofing installments to date. “This year’s submissions demonstrated asphalt’s ability to provide a durable and reliable roofing system against harsh weather while simultaneously offering an array of beautiful colors, designs and installation options,” said Ralph Vasami, ARMA’s acting executive vice president. “These projects are true examples of what asphalt roofing can offer commercial businesses and private homeowners alike.”

The 2018 QARC Award recipients are:

Gold
Project Name: The Cincinnati Music Hall
Company: Imbus Roofing Co. Inc.
Project Description: This steep-slope roof was installed with CertainTeed’s Grand Manor luxury asphalt shingles in the colors Stonegate Gray and Brownstone, as well as DiamondDeck and WinterGuard underlayments. The size, complexity and steepness of the project presented a great challenge to the contractor, who managed to install a durable asphalt roofing system that was also visually stunning.

Imbus Roofing received top honors for its work on 139-year-old Cincinnati Music Hall. Photo: CertainTeed

Silver
Project Name: Topsail Residence
Company: Reliant Roofing Inc.
Project Description: GAF Grand Canyon Lifetime Designer Shingles in the color Stone Wood was selected not only for its beauty, but its superior high-wind protection. Hand sealed Timbertex Premium Ridge Cap Shingles and GAF self-adhering Leak Barrier were also installed for added leak prevention.

Reliant Roofing received the Silver QARC Award for its completion of Topsail Residence in Ponte Vedra, Florida. Photo: Justin Alley and Kyle Brumbley

Bronze
Project Name: Museum of the American Revolution
Company: The Thomas Company Inc.
Project Description: The historic project required a high-quality roofing membrane that offered an aesthetic appeal to the building. Thomas Company chose SOPREMA’s SBS Modified Base Ply – ELASTOPHENE Flam with the SBS Modified Bitumen Flashing Base Ply – SOPRALENE Flam 180 to keep the roof water-resistant year-round, protect the roof membrane from foot traffic and add a beautiful appearance to the museum.

The Bronze QARC Award was given to Thomas Company Inc. of Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, for its work on Philadelphia’s Museum of the American Revolution. Photo: Soprema

Honorable Mentions:
Big House Castle Rock
Jireh 7 Enterprises
Castle Rock, Colorado
Malarkey Roofing Products

Closson Chase Winery Church Roof
AI Anthony Roofing LTD
Hillier, Ontario
IKO Production Inc.

Tiny House & Top Shop
M & J Construction
Erhard, Minnesota
CertainTeed Corporation

West Loch Village Senior Apartments
M & R Roofing
Ewa Beach, Hawaii
PABCO Roofing Products

For more information about this year’s winners or to submit an asphalt roofing project, visit www.asphaltroofing.org.

Perforated Starter Shingle Designed to Save Time and Reduce Waste

TAMKO Building Products, Inc. introduces the Perforated Starter shingle to its roofing product line. Made from fiberglass mat coated with asphalt and surfaced with ceramic granules, the Perforated Starter course shingle is the answer to roofing contractors need for an easy to install starter strip prior to shingle application. The perforation ensures that contractors no longer lose time field cutting shingles to the appropriate size while reducing related waste.

“Roofing contractors need more ways to make their jobs hassle-free,” said Vice President of Sales and Marketing for TAMKO, Stephen McNally.  “With TAMKO’s Perforated Starter shingle, you remove the tedious time-consuming job of field cutting shingles for the starter course so roofing contractors can finish a job quicker with less waste.”

TAMKO’s Perforated Starter shingle is intended for application to the eave or rake edge of a roof to assist with proper alignment of the shingle course. The starter strip also fills in the spaces under the shingle joints and helps the first course of shingles to seal. Perforated Starter comes in a bundle of 16 full-size (13 ¼ inches) perforated shingles to be separated into 32 starter strip shingles (6 ⅝ inches).

Available now to customers nationwide, the Perforated Starter shingle is being produced at TAMKO’s Frederick, Maryland manufacturing facility. The Perforated Starter shingle can be used with TAMKO’s full line of asphalt shingles including the Heritage series laminated asphalt shingles and Elite Glass-Seal 3-Tab shingles.

For more information, visit TAMKO.com.

Asphalt Shingles Offer Algae Resistance Warranty

PABCO Algae DefenderPABCO Roofing Products announces its new premium asphalt shingles featuring Algae Defender with an algae resistance warranty. Many areas of the United States are susceptible to black streaks on rooftops caused by algae – especially coastal regions or those that experience high humidity. Preventing those black streaks helps preserve your home’s curb appeal.

PABCO shingles and accessories featuring Algae Defender prevent black streaks caused by algae from forming on your roof, according to the company. “We have a precise target blend of copper containing granules in the manufacturing process and our results are closely monitored during every production run,” explains Rebecca Newman, Plant Operations Manager, “When moisture contacts your Algae Defender protected roof in the form of dew or rain, copper ions are gradually released over time to provide reliable protection from black streaks caused by blue-green algae.”

With more than two decades of experience in producing algae resistant shingles, PABCO has seen proven results from our manufacturing techniques. Newman adds, “We are constantly monitoring our algae resistant shingles in actual field installations to ensure they are performing to our high standards.”

PABCO shingles with Algae Defender are available in most markets where PABCO is sold. “We are excited about the Algae Defender warranty – which is Limited Lifetime for many products – and are confident in the performance.” States Gerry Kilian, General Sales Manager. “It is such a benefit to the homeowner to have that kind of protection.”

For more information, visit pabcoroofing.com.

Ventco Makes New Technical Catalog Available Online

Ventco Inc. has published its 2018 Technical Catalog and made it available for download on a revamped website.

“We’re excited about our new website and being able to offer our new Technical Catalog as a download there,” says Marty Rotter, owner of Ventco. “If you have a question about the compatibility of ProfileVent with 47 metal roofing panels or how to install ProfileVent, the information is available in the Technical Catalog.”

The new Technical Catalog and other Ventco brochures can be downloaded at: http://profilevent.com/brochure.html.

The 54-page catalog, which can be downloaded and printed, also includes information on Hip&RidgeVent, Contractors’ Choice, The RidgeVent and Mongoose ridge vent for asphalt, slate and cedar shingle roofs. The catalog features testing information and proper installation instructions for all Ventco products.

For more information, visit www.profilevent.com

Shingle Starter Material Is Non-porous

SBS Shingle Starter is a SBS modified starter strip coated on both sides with SBS rubberized asphalt compound and surfaced with black ceramic granules.

SBS Shingle Starter is a SBS modified starter strip coated on both sides with SBS rubberized asphalt compound and surfaced with black ceramic granules.

MB Technology’s SBS Shingle Starter is a premium SBS modified starter strip completely coated on both sides with SBS rubberized asphalt compound and surfaced with black ceramic granules. The SBS rubberized membrane provides a flexible starter roll and, because it’s non-porous, it provides a watertight membrane by itself. The fiberglass-reinforced product is used for eave and rake starter material for composition roofing. It is used with minimum 3/8-inch head roofing nails, fastened 12 inches on center and at 4 to 6 inches above the edge of the roof or as required by the shingle manufacturer.

Enter ARMA’s Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-study Awards Program

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) is searching for the top asphalt roofing projects in North America. Roofing contractors, architects, consultants and specifiers are invited to submit commercial and residential roofing projects to the association’s Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-study (QARC) Awards program, now and through the end of the year.

Each year a Gold, Silver and Bronze winner are chosen. These roofing professionals receive cash prizes and gain national recognition. Winners and their projects receive media coverage and are featured in top trade publications. This year, ARMA has redesigned its submission process to make it easier than ever. Simply upload photos of your project along with a description and details about why asphalt roofing materials were chosen. High-resolution photos of the completed project are strongly encouraged for submission. Both new construction and renovation projects are eligible for the program.

Submissions for the 2016 Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-study Awards Program are currently being accepted through Saturday, Dec. 31. Roofing professionals can submit as many projects as they want without any cost to enter.

“The QARC program helps ARMA recognize the most beautiful and innovative asphalt roofing projects being built or restored today,” says Reed Hitchcock, executive vice president of ARMA. “By celebrating the use of asphalt materials in these low- and steep-slope projects, we shine a light on skilled roofing contractors who demonstrate the benefits of asphalt roofing.”

For more information on the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case Study Awards Program, visit ARMA’s website.

Asphalt and Polyurethane Create Durable Membrane

The Garland Co. Inc.’s OptiMax polyurethane-modified asphalt-based roof membrane is developed with a process that combines asphalt with polyurethane to create a durable and long-lasting modified membrane.

The Garland Co. Inc.’s OptiMax polyurethane-modified asphalt-based roof membrane is developed with a process that combines asphalt with polyurethane to create a durable and long-lasting modified membrane.

The Garland Co. Inc.’s OptiMax polyurethane-modified asphalt-based roof membrane is developed with a process that combines asphalt with polyurethane to create a durable and long-lasting modified membrane. OptiMax becomes increasingly resilient as it ages because, with time, polyurethane molecules are chemically linked with one another. The process was first used in Europe in the paving industry.

When traditional SBS-modified membranes age, the oils within the membrane heat up and “cook out”, causing cracking and eventually leaking. OptiMax utilizes an “active modification” process, which involves chemically reacting the polyurethane modifier to specific molecules within the asphalt. This modification provides enhanced long-term performance characteristics and weatherability.

Its performance is further improved by the fact that minerals are more strongly attracted to the polyurethane in the OptiMax membrane. The result is improved adhesion thus providing UV protection, preventing the likelihood of cracking and leaking issues common in traditional membranes. During advanced surface testing, OptiMax had fewer cracks when compared to traditional asphalt-modified membranes and retained its tensile strength in the face of damaging UV radiation.

“OptiMax has the ability to literally change the face of the roofing industry. This new technology will revolutionize the market and redefine expectations of building owners in terms of performance and protection. OptiMax has been engineered to outperform other commercial roofing products in the industry,” explains Melissa Rus, Garland’s director of research and development.

PHOTO: The Garland Co. Inc.

RM Lucas Establishes New Headquarters and Manufacturing Plant

RM Lucas announces the new Lucas headquarters and manufacturing plant.

RM Lucas moved into a new Lucas headquarters and manufacturing plant.

RM Lucas moved into a new Lucas headquarters and manufacturing plant. The facility is located at 12400 S. Laramie Ave. in Alsip, Ill. The location has frontage on Interstate 294 that circles Chicago and provides easy access for shipping and receiving to all points in North America.

The 92,000-square-foot facility features 12,000 square feet of offices, 5,000 square feet of research and development space and 75,000 square feet of warehouse and manufacturing. New mixing, filling and laboratory testing equipment will be installed in the new facility. Production is scheduled to start in late 2015. This facility will replace a smaller sealants plant opened in 2013. The Chicago plant will continue operations with expanded capacity for asphalt products.

ARMA Is Looking for Asphalt Roofing Projects to Showcase

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) is looking for the top commercial and residential asphalt roofing projects to showcase in its 2016 Quality Asphalt Roofing Case Study (QARC) Awards Program.

The QARC Awards are open to contractors, consultants, architects and specifiers working with asphalt roofing products. The top three projects that best demonstrate the beauty, affordability and reliability of asphalt roofing will take the prize.

Submissions for the 2016 QARC Awards Program are currently being accepted through Thursday, Dec. 31. Roofing professionals can submit as many projects as they want without any cost to enter.

Industry professionals can enter their project online through the QARC Awards page of ARMA’s website by providing a description of the project and explaining why and how asphalt products were used. High-resolution photos of the completed project are also required for submission. Both new construction and renovation projects are eligible for the program.

“The gold, silver and bronze winners of the QARC Awards Program are selected by leaders in the roofing industry,” says Reed Hitchcock, executive vice president of ARMA. “Previous recipients have been chosen for the beauty that their project displays, as well as how it demonstrates the benefits of asphalt roofing systems. From weather protection and energy efficiency to fire and wind resistance, QARC winners demonstrate the breadth of performance that asphalt roofing systems provide.”

ARMA awards cash prizes to the top three roofing projects, and the winners are featured in national roofing trade publications. For more information on the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case Study Awards Program, please visit ARMA’s website.