Snips Provide Durability and Longevity

Stanley's FATMAX Snips feature extended-life cutting blades compared to previous FATMAX Snips, providing a new level of durability and longevity.

Stanley’s FATMAX Snips feature extended-life cutting blades compared to previous FATMAX Snips, providing a new level of durability and longevity.

Stanley launches its robust line-up of FATMAX Snips for professional construction markets.

Stanley is offering 19 FATMAX Snips which include aviation, tin and specialty HVAC snips. They feature extended-life cutting blades compared to previous FATMAX Snips, providing a new level of durability and longevity.

Aviation Snips have become popular recently because the linkage on the snips increases the mechanical advantage without increasing the blade length of the snips. Previously known as compound-action snips, they were developed for the aviation industry in the construction of aircraft, but are widely used in many construction trades today.

Research shows that pros want snips with high-longevity and durability of cutting edges for fast and precise cutting. In fact, pros who use snips frequently will buy new ones up to once a month.

To achieve cutting longevity, the FATMAX Snips are manufactured with forged Cr-V steel blades and induction-hardened. They are also rated for 18 gauge cold-rolled steel and 22-gauge stainless steel, which meet ANSI specifications. The FATMAX Bulldog Snip is rated for 16-gauge cold rolled steel or 20-gauge stainless steel, also meeting the ANSI specifications.

The 1/4-inch blade markings offer quick, precise cutting, eliminating the need to measure and mark the cut. Spring-loaded external latches provide quick one-handed operation and allow for quick and easy access in and out of work pouch. FATMAX Offset Snips have offset angled blades to provide clearance between the snip and the material while cutting.

Low-profile hardware includes a slim bolt that helps provide strength, while keeping a low profile for access. Flush-mount hardware also helps prevent catching on materials or opening in the tool pouch versus external hardware as found on others. Slim bi-material grips provide comfort for a full day’s work.

These snips are backed with a limited lifetime warranty. If the product fails during its useful life due to any deficiencies in material and product, they will be replaced. A person must contact customer service or send damaged tool to Stanley Tools, Quality Assurance, 1000 Stanley Drive, Concord, NC 28027.

PERC Provides Safety Tips for Using Propane Heaters on Job Sites

During the cold winter months, construction professionals who use temporary, propane-powered heating equipment on the job site can be more productive, making it easier to finish projects on time and on budget. In addition to providing more comfortable working conditions, propane-powered heaters can also maintain the ambient temperatures necessary for common tasks like drywall installation or painting. However, like any portable heating device, propane-powered heaters must be used and maintained properly.

A temporary propane unit that pumps hot air through existing ductwork.

A temporary propane unit that pumps hot air through existing ductwork.


“Considering the cold and snowy weather that much of the country has experienced lately, it’s an ideal time to remind builders and remodelers how important it is to properly install, maintain and use propane-powered heaters,” says Bridget Kidd, director of residential and commercial programs for the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC). “By following a few simple guidelines, they can ensure optimum job site performance, comfort and safety.”

PERC offers the following advice to help construction professionals stay safe and warm this winter:

At sites using propane cylinders to power heaters:
  • Ensure that propane cylinders are in good condition without bulges, dents, excessive rust or signs of fire damage.
  • Always transport cylinders to the job site in an upright and secured position.
  • Do not use a cylinder indoors that holds more than 100 pounds of propane.
  • Connect no more than three 100-pound propane cylinders to one manifold inside a building. All manifolds should be separated by at least 20 feet of space.
  • Check all cylinders for leaks with a suitable leak detector solution—not soap and water, which may have corrosive properties.
At sites using external propane tanks to power heaters:
  • Locate tanks a sufficient distance from property lines and the structure under construction. Consult local building codes to ensure proper compliance.
  • Place the tank on stable ground, and when locating the tank consider the potential effects of freezing and thawing.
  • Use rigid piping from the tank to the building. Flexible tubing may be safely used indoors.
  • Have a qualified propane technician ensure that all connections between the tank and heater are free of leaks.
  • Protect tanks and piping on the work site from the possibility of vehicle impact.
  • Do not store combustible material within 10 feet of any tank.
When using salamanders and other propane heaters:
  • Choose a heater that’s sized appropriately for the square footage you want to heat.
  • Keep heaters away from potentially combustible materials.
  • Only operate heaters in ventilated areas. Make sure there’s sufficient air both for combustion and to prevent carbon monoxide accumulation.
  • Use only those heaters with 100 percent safety shut-off valves.
  • When the project is complete, first turn off gas at the container valve to drain hoses or pipes before shutting off the heater itself.
  • Only allow a qualified LP gas technician to make any repairs to faulty equipment.

While kerosene and electric heaters are also available, propane is the cleanest and smartest fuel choice for job site heating. Kerosene heaters can produce an undesirable film on nearby equipment or walls. Electric heaters can’t generate nearly as many BTUs as propane-fueled heaters and they put additional load on the mobile generators used to produce electricity for power tools used around the job site.

“When it comes to heating a temporary construction site, and for other uses around the job site, propane’s benefits are clear,” Kidd adds. “Because it’s a low-carbon, alternative fuel, construction professionals who use propane-powered heaters, generators, light towers and other equipment can maintain a cleaner environment without sacrificing power or performance.”

For more information about the benefits of using clean, efficient propane on residential or commercial building sites, learning about new propane-powered products, or considering the financial incentives available on propane equipment purchases, visit the Build With Propane website.

Portland Cement Association Announces Housing Starts Will Increase by 20 Percent in 2015

Residential housing starts will be on the increase in 2015, according to the Portland Cement Association (PCA). During the 2015 International Builders’ Show, PCA Chief Economist and Group Vice President Edward J. Sullivan announced that housing starts will increase 20 percent to 1.2 million units in 2015. This is up from roughly 950,000 units in 2014, and strong gains are also expected for 2016.

Multifamily units in particular should see a significant increase in starts compared to previous years with a 12 percent jump from 2014 levels. Nearly 400,000 multifamily starts are expected in 2015 in addition to 800,000 new units in the single-family market. The trend in multifamily construction is expected to persist throughout the forecast horizon as high student debt keeps millennials out of the new home market and baby boomers leave the market.

“The forecast is based on sustained strength in the labor markets with more than 3 million net new jobs created in both 2015 and 2016,” Sullivan says. “In addition, wage gains in the context of sub-6 percent unemployment are expected to reinforce labor market fundamentals.”

Sustained strength in job creation, coupled with a gradual shift in the mix of jobs toward higher skill and more significant wage pressures suggest added strength to consumer spending. Debt to household income now lies at an 18-year low. Consumer balance sheets have endured a healing period and with improvement in the labor markets will be more able to spend than they have been in quite some time.

Construction Unemployment Rate Falls

The unemployment rate for construction workers fell to the lowest July level in five years, even though employment has stagnated in the past four months, according to an analysis of new government data by the Associated General Contractors of America. Association officials urged Washington leaders to act on stalled infrastructure funding measures to help jump start construction hiring. The unemployment rate for workers who last worked in construction declined to 9.1 percent from 12.3 percent in July 2012, not seasonally adjusted, and the number of unemployed construction workers dropped by 227,000 to 767,000. Construction employment in July totaled 5,793,000, seasonally adjusted, up by 166,000, or 3 percent, from July 2012 but down by 6,000 from the revised June level. Although residential and nonresidential contractors have added workers in the past year, employment growth in July occurred only on the residential side.