DaVinci Roofscapes Lowers Price of Roofing Products

Efficiencies at its Kansas facility in 2016 has permitted DaVinci Roofscapes to lower pricing on the company’s roofing products. Price reductions went into effect during the fourth quarter of 2016 and range from 11 percent to 16 percent on several of the company’s synthetic shake and slate product lines.
           
“Adding more workers and line equipment at our plant along with other advances have enabled us to leverage our operational efficiencies and pass the savings on to our distributors,” says Ray Rosewall, president and CEO for DaVinci Roofscapes. “We’re going outside of the box by sharing our cost savings to make our composite roofing products even more accessible to roofers and owners across the country.”
           
“We’re conscious of what the market is telling us versus what our competitors are doing. For us, it’s all about advancing the growth of our customer’s business.”
           
“When DaVinci started manufacturing synthetic roofing tiles about two decades ago they were considered specialty products. Now, thanks to technological advancements our slate and shake tiles are seen more as main stream products. This means we’re very comfortable competing against products like slate, real cedar, asphalt and other materials. From an aesthetic, performance and cost standpoint synthetic roofing products are competitive.”
           
“Most importantly, we’ve heard from distributors, roofers and builders that our products are becoming preferred to the natural roofing products. People want the expected look of shake and slate, but they want the benefits that a manmade product offers. We’ve achieved that goal by creating realistic-looking products with additional features.”
           
New molds allowed DaVinci to enhance the look of all of its slate profiles in 2016. The thicker profiles replicate the quarried look of slate at a cost less than natural slate. Thanks to recent price reductions, pricing for the company’s Bellaforté Shake tiles falls below pricing of many real cedar shingles, but with the added benefit of resistance to fire, splitting, curling, mold and algae.
           
The team members at DaVinci Roofscapes develop and manufacture polymer slate and shake roofing systems with an authentic look and performance. DaVinci offers a selection of colors, tile thickness and tile width variety. The company’s products have a limited lifetime warranty and are 100 percent recyclable. All DaVinci roofing products are made in America where the company is a member of the National Association of Home Builders, the National Association of Roofing Contractors, the Cool Roof Rating Council and the U.S. Green Building Council.

Correct Side Lap on a Slate Roof

I’ve been asked to examine slate roof installations all across the U.S., and one of the most disheartening things I’ve observed is how often incorrect side laps are used. For example, the photo shows a slate roof that was installed less than one year ago and already has more than a dozen leaks. Why? Among one of the most basic problems is the side lap.

This slate roof was installed less than one year ago and already has more than a dozen leaks. One of the most basic problems is the side lap.

This slate roof was installed less than one year ago and already has more than a dozen leaks. One of the most basic problems is the side lap. PHOTO: John Chan

The side-lap detail drawing that appears on this page is from the National Slate Association’s Slate Roofs: Design and Installation Manual, page 86, Detail 5-B. The side lap also is referred to as a side joint, vertical joint, keyway, bond line or rain course. As defined in the glossary of the NSA manual, it’s “the longitudinal joint between two slate shingles”.

Whenever one is installing a slate roof, it is absolutely imperative the side lap is a minimum of 3 inches. As seen in the detail, if the lap is less than 3 inches, water will flow in between the two slates and leak into the building. When I’m asked to inspect a problematic new slate roof, I find the side and head laps are the problems on a majority of all cases across the country.

If you’re installing a single-sized slate, such as 20 by 12 inches, the slates should be installed so the joints are exactly split in two; the side laps on the whole roof should be 6 inches. Similarly, if the roof has 10-inch-wide slate, the side laps should be 5 inches. Whatever the width, the side lap should always be one-half the width on a single-sized slate.

It gets a little trickier on a random-width slate roof. Slate widths can be as narrow as 6 inches or as wide as 20 inches or more. When dealing with 6-inch slates, the joint obviously must be split exactly in the center, so there are 3 inches on each side. If you question the width, pull out a tape measure; this will save you and the building owner lots of money and headaches. When there are inadequate side laps, inevitably, the owner, architect or general contractor gets concerned, and then I get a phone call to do a full roof survey on the slate roof.

Click to download a larger version of this side-lap detail drawing from the National Slate Association’s <em>Slate Roofs: Design and Installation Manual</em<, page 86, Detail 5-B.

Click to download a larger version of this side-lap detail drawing from the National Slate Association’s Slate
Roofs: Design and Installation Manual
, page 86, Detail 5-B.

As slaters become more advanced, they are able to eyeball 3 inches extremely well, but until that point, installers should use a tape measure, or they should stick with using single-sized slates. It might seem too easy, but this is one of the most common errors I encounter. If a slater studies Detail 5-B and adheres to it, he or she will avoid having this problem with slate roof installations.

Too often, slate is given a bad name because of poor installation. Hopefully, this article and detail will resolve that problem.