Working From Home

After more than three decades working in an office setting, I recently joined the ranks of the people working from home. The situation has its obvious advantages — my commute time has been cut down to less than a minute — but I must admit I’m still getting used to it.

There are a few problems I’ve encountered in my home office that I didn’t have to cope with before. The other day our cat, Boo, ran across my keyboard and renamed a file “;;;;////.” Luckily it jumped to the top of the folder I was working in, or I’d probably still be looking for it. I’ve gotten better at timing the delivery of a Kong toy stuffed with peanut butter to keep our dog, Josie, from barking during phone interviews, but it still sometimes happens, especially when packages are delivered on our block.

Working from home and working in an office have their challenges, but I realize how lucky I am. Every week I talk to people who work at the top of buildings large and small, making the roof of a commercial building or a home their temporary office. I’ve learned each jobsite has its own obstacles and its own set of risks. Each project also has its own rewards.

This issue puts the spotlight on hospitality and entertainment projects, and as a sports fan it was a thrill to cover stories about new construction projects including the PVC roof installation atop U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, and MB Arena in Chicago, the practice home of the NHL’s Chicago Blackhawks, which sports a TPO roof and two garden roof systems.

This issue also explores the roof renovation that took place at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, known as “The Q.” The project was completed during the Cavaliers’ historic NBA World Championship run and while the Cleveland Indians were hosting the World Series right next door at Progressive Field.

Working from home has its small hurdles, but making sure the jobsite looks pristine when viewed from a blimp is not one of them.

That was the case in Cleveland, where crew members worked on their hands and knees to restore the roof under the giant LED sign at The Q before the World Series. It was also the case in Chicago, where Willie Hedrick of All American Exterior Solutions in Lake Zurich, Illinois, was proud to see his work on display during aerial views televised during the Stanley Cup playoffs. “When the Blackhawks went to the Stanley Cup championship and the blimp was hovering over the arena, I could see a couple of my projects on TV,” he noted. “It reminded me of all the time, effort, attention to detail, and collaborative hard work that it took to produce the final product.”

Remind me never to complain about my cat ever again.

PVC System Is the Answer for U.S. Bank Stadium Roof

U.S. Bank Stadium is topped with a PVC roof system that display’s the company’s logo. Photo: Johns Manville

When discussions began about the new U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota, there was a request for an outdoor stadium. However, state and local government provided funding specifically for an indoor stadium that would be able to host major events like the professional football championship game and the college basketball championship game. As a result, a translucent roof and mobile front windows were designed to allow natural light to enter the stadium and to give fans a view of downtown Minneapolis. The mobile windows also allow fans to experience outdoor elements while providing protection from snow, rain and cold winter weather. The roof design was developed taking into consideration the budget and the region’s weather; it would be costly to make it retractable, and a sloped roof lends to a more secure option for snowy weather.

Challenging Task

Berwald Roofing Company Inc., headquartered in North St. Paul, Minnesota, installed an adhered PVC roof system manufactured by Johns Manville over the structure’s metal deck. In all, 280,000 square feet of grey 60-mil PVC were installed. The system also included a vapor barrier and two layers of 1.6-inch ENRGY 3, a rigid roof insulation board composed of a closed-cell polyisocyanurate foam core with fiberglass reinforced facers. Half-inch DensDeck Prime cover board from Georgia-Pacific was also installed.

The roofing portion of the project began in April 2015, with an aggressive completion deadline of November 1, 2015. The schedule and logistics on the project posed major hurdles. “Getting material 300 feet up to the roof was our biggest challenge,” says Berwald Roofing Senior Project Manager Steven Hegge. “A big part of that was scheduling time to share the cranes with the iron workers and general contractor.”

Another challenge was storing material during the installation due to the limited amount of space on the roof. “All the decking had to be installed as we went along, just before roof installation,” Hegge states. “We were on a very tight time schedule in this multiple-phase construction project.”

“The general contractor and Berwald Roofing have worked with Johns Manville on numerous stadium projects in the past and preferred to use JM PVC on this complicated stadium project,” notes Johns Manville sales rep Bob Deans. “This application is on a 3.75-inch to 12-inch slope on the north side of the building, which adds to the difficulty of installing a fully adhered PVC roof assembly.”

The Solution

Due to restricted loading space at the jobsite, materials arrived to Berwald’s yard directly from the manufacturer. They were then loaded on Berwald Roofing semi-trucks each day for delivery. Once they arrived at the site, they were immediately lifted to the roof via tower cranes and installed in the most efficient time frame, to meet the owners expected installation timeline.

The stadium seats approximately 65,000 people for most games. However, this space is built to be expandable to hold up to 73,000 attendees for special events such as the professional football championship game, which the stadium is scheduled to host on February 4, 2018, and for events like the college basketball championship game, which will be held there in 2019. U.S. Bank’s logo is prominently displayed on the rooftop. Charcoal grey 60-mil PVC membrane was cut to specification using a computerized cutter to create an exact replica of the U.S. Bank logo. Berwald Roofing then adhered the charcoal grey PVC on top of the grey 60 mil PVC membrane using JM PVC low-VOC membrane adhesive and then heat-welded the edges of material to finish the application of the logo.

TEAM

Architects: HKS Inc., www.hksinc.com; Studio Hive, www.studiohive.com; Studio Five; and Lawal Scott Erickson Architects Inc., http://lse-architects.com
General Contractor: Mortenson Construction, Minneapolis, Minnesota, www.mortenson.com
Roofing Contractor: Berwald Roofing Company Inc., North St. Paul, Minnesota, https://berwaldroofing.com

MATERIALS

Roof System: 60-mil PVC, Johns Manville, www.jm.com/roofing
Vapor Barrier: Johns Manville
Insulation: ENRGY 3® Insulation, Johns Manville
Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.gp.com