National Fall Prevention Safety Stand-Down Scheduled for May 6-10

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is joining with occupational safety organizations for the 6th annual National Fall Prevention Safety Stand-Down, May 6-10, 2019. The week-long event will focus attention on preventing falls in construction, the leading cause of fatalities in the industry.

The national stand-down encourages employers and workers to pause voluntarily during the workday for safety demonstrations, training in hazard recognition and fall prevention, and talks about hazards, protective methods, and the company’s safety policies, goals and expectations.

“Falls can be prevented when employers train and educate workers about these hazards properly and provide appropriate protection,” said Acting Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Loren Sweatt. “This should be a priority during the first week of May and must be a priority every day. OSHA has tools readily available for employers and workers to address the prevention of fall hazards.”

OSHA anticipates thousands of work sites and millions of workers to observe the stand down worldwide in 2019. To help guide their efforts, the Agency’s fall prevention webpage provides information on how to conduct a successful event, and educational resources in English and Spanish, including:

  • A series of fall safety videos that demonstrate how to prevent fall hazards from floor openings, skylights, fixed scaffolds, bridge decking, reroofing, and leading edge work.
  • OSHA’s Fall Prevention Training Guide that provides a lesson plan for employers, including several Toolbox Talks.
  • Fact sheets on ladders and scaffolding that describe the safe use of these types of equipment while performing construction activities.
  • A brief video, 5 Ways to Prevent Workplace Falls, encourages employers to develop a fall prevention plan, and to provide workers with fall protection and training.

Employers are encouraged to provide feedback after their events, and to obtain a personalized certificate of participation. The national safety stand-down is part of OSHA’s fall prevention campaign, and was developed in partnership with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, National Occupational Research Agenda, and The Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR). To learn more about preventing falls in construction, visit OSHA’s Fall Prevention Campaign page.

For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

U.S. Department of Labor Issues Final Rule on Crane Operator Certification Requirements

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published a final rule that clarifies certification requirements for crane operators, and maintains the employer’s duty to ensure that crane operators can safely operate the equipment. The final rule will maintain safety and health protections for workers while reducing compliance burdens.

Under the final rule, employers are required to train operators as needed to perform assigned crane activities, evaluate them, and document successful completion of the evaluations. Employers who have evaluated operators prior to December 9, 2018, will not have to conduct those evaluations again, but will only have to document when those evaluations were completed.

The rule also requires crane operators to be certified or licensed, and receive ongoing training as necessary to operate new equipment. Operators can be certified based on the crane’s type and capacity, or type only, which ensures that more accredited testing organizations are eligible to meet OSHA’s certification program requirements. The final rule revises a 2010 requirement that crane operator certification must specify the rated lifting capacity of cranes for which the operator is certified. Compliant certifications that were already issued by type and capacity are still acceptable under this final rule.

The final rule, with the exception of the evaluation and documentation requirements, will become effective on Dec. 9, 2018. The evaluation and documentation requirements will become effective on February 7, 2019.

For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

 

U.S. Department of Labor Kicks Off Safe + Sound Week August 13

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) encourages Americans to commit to workplace safety and health by participating in Safe + Sound Week, August 13-19, 2018.

More than 200 organizations and businesses are partnering with OSHA to promote the importance of safety and health programs. Implementing a safety and health program is one of the most effective ways to reduce injuries and illnesses, and improve business. Effective programs can increase worker satisfaction, improve productivity, and reduce costs associated with workplace injuries.

Establishing a safety and health program is simple. Some steps to get started include worker training, hazard identification, and seeking worker input to maintaining safety on the job.

Participating in Safe + Sound Week is easy. Organizations of any size or in any industry looking for an opportunity to show their commitment to safety can participate. Start by visiting www.osha.gov/safeandsoundweek for more information, resources, and tools to help plan and promote safety events.

For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

OSHA Extends Deadline for Electronically Submitted Injury, Illness Reports

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will continue accepting 2016 OSHA Form 300A data through the Injury Tracking Application (ITA) until midnight on Dec. 31, 2017. OSHA will not take enforcement action against those employers who submit their reports after the Dec. 15, 2017, deadline but before Dec. 31, 2017, final entry date. Starting Jan. 1, 2018, the ITA will no longer accept the 2016 data.

For more information, visit www.osha.gov.