Silicone Sealant Repairs Roofs, Masonry and Sheet Metal

The 100 percent Silicone Sealant seals and repairs roofs, masonry, architectural sheet metal, and metal roof seams and fasteners.

The 100 percent Silicone Sealant seals and repairs roofs, masonry, architectural sheet metal, and metal roof seams and fasteners.

Mule-Hide Products Co. has added 100 percent Silicone Sealant choices to its Silicone Roof Coating System, expanding the color offering to include clear and the packaging options to include 10-ounce tubes.
 
100 percent Silicone Sealant is a mastic version of the Mule-Hide 100 percent Silicone Roof Coating. It is a moisture-cure silicone sealant designed for use in sealing and repairing roofs, masonry, architectural sheet metal, and metal roof seams and fasteners. 
 
The addition of clear sealant allows contractors to complete projects that would otherwise require color-matching. It is available packaged in tubes only.

In addition to clear, the tubes are available filled with white sealant. The plastic cartridges are an option for use in smaller applications or when precision is required. They also can be submerged under water to repair roof leaks, gutters and downspouts.
 
100 percent Silicone Sealant provides adhesion to concrete, masonry, polyurethane foam, EPDM membranes, TPO membranes, aged PVC membranes, aged acrylic coatings, granular cap sheets, wood, metals, Kynar finishes and most other building materials. When using 100 percent Silicone Sealant with a TPO roof membrane, Mule-Hide Si TPO Primer must be applied first. 
 
The sealant has minimal odor, making it contractor- and building-occupant-friendly. Its volatile organic compound (VOC) content of less than 10 grams per liter makes it acceptable for use in areas with VOC restrictions. It does not corrode metals.
 

NRCA Urges Participation in National Roofing Week

To increase recognition of the significance of roofs, stress the value of professional roofing contractors, bring attention to the value of a career in roofing and promote the good deeds of the industry, the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) is urging communities throughout the U.S. to recognize National Roofing Week taking place June 4-10.

The roof is one of the components of a structure, yet it often is taken for granted until it falls into disrepair. During National Roofing Week, NRCA encourages its members to participate by engaging in their communities and informing the public about the role roofs and professional roofing contractors play in every community.

Most roof systems last more than 20 years; however, routine evaluation and maintenance is necessary to extend its life and keep overall costs down. NRCA urges consumers to observe National Roofing Week by paying attention to wear and tear on their roof systems and to make informed decisions about roof system maintenance and replacement.

“Professional roofing contractors play a role in every community, and National Roofing Week provides the roofing industry the opportunity to demonstrate the importance of the work we do,” says NRCA Chairman of the Board Dennis Conway. “I look forward to sharing the roofing industry’s stories of professional excellence and charitable giving during National Roofing Week.”

NRCA will recognize National Roofing Week by highlighting the work, training and good deeds of its members and their employees on its various social media outlets. The winners of NRCA’s fourth annual children’s art contest will also be announced. Children in grades 1-8, who are relatives of NRCA members and their employees submitted artwork depicting the importance of roofs and the professional roofing contractor.

Contest winners will have their artwork featured on all National Roofing Week material and additional promotional material to be displayed at industry events throughout the year, including the 2018 International Roofing Expo and NRCA’s 131th Annual Convention in New Orleans.

Additional information about National Roofing Week can be found here.

Contractors and Manufacturers Team Up to Make Life Better

In a small town in Florida, a disabled Army vet received help when he was on the verge of losing his home because he couldn’t afford a new roof. In Kansas, proceeds from the raffle of a new home went to help fight childhood cancer. In Texas, victims of a damaging storm and unscrupulous swindlers had new roofs installed and their faith in people restored.

In each case, Atlas Roofing and local contractors stepped in to nail shingles and improve people’s lives, just as they do across the nation on a regular basis.

“A well-installed roof with quality roofing products can represent a big improvement in someone’s life,” says Kirk Villar, vice president of sales and marketing, roof shingles and underlayment at Atlas Roofing Corporation. “Shingles can help build communities, and we are proud to partner with roofing contractors to help make that happen.”

Here are three stories of Atlas Roofing and local contractors making life better for people who needed help.

Assisting a Veteran

On a cul-de-sac in Ocoee, Fla., neighbors still take care of one another. Art Burkholder, a 74-year-old retired and disabled veteran, recently discovered that human kindness, compassion and charity are still alive and well in our world.

Burkholder, a former Army sergeant, has lived in his home since 1989. He suffered a stroke in 1998 and a heart attack just two years later. Now Burkholder, who lives on a modest fixed income, is battling cancer.

When Burkholder’s home insurance lapsed, he couldn’t get it renewed without having a new roof installed. And without insurance, his bank placed him into a state of forced foreclosure.

He couldn’t afford to fix the roof, and he couldn’t afford to move. Burkholder received the foreclosure notice in August of 2016. In a panic, he finally went to neighbor Tami Kneidinger for help.

Those who live on Burkholder’s street are like a close-knit family. Kneidinger, who lived next door to Burkholder for 15 years, and his other neighbors put together a GoFundMe campaign to raise the money needed to install a new roof. They wanted to keep him at home, near the people who care about him.

The campaign raised about a third of what was needed to fix Burkholder’s roof—nowhere near the goal. So Kneidinger and another neighbor started writing letters asking for help.

One of the letters came to the attention of Victor Osage of G & A Certified Roofing in Winter Park, Fla., and Colin Hobbs of Atlas Roofing, who agreed to supply Burkholder with 33 squares of shingles directly from Atlas.

Osage and his G & A Roofing team replaced the roof in November 2016. The crew fixed several leaking deck boards, cut away low-lying tree branches and installed Atlas Pinnacle Pristine asphalt shingles and Summit 60 synthetic underlayment.

“It was an honor to be able to do this for Mr. Burkholder,” Osage says. “He is a wonderful man and obviously loved by his entire neighborhood.”

Thanks to G & A Certified Roofing and Atlas Roofing, together with Kneidinger and all of Burkholder’s generous neighbors, the Army vet is no longer facing foreclosure. “If it weren’t for Atlas, none of this would have worked out,” says Kneidinger.

Keeping Dreams Alive

Since 1962, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has devoted itself to finding cures for diseases and treating sick children. Founded by stage and screen comedian Danny Thomas and two friends on the premise that “no child should die in the dawn of life,” discoveries at St. Jude’s have changed the way doctors treat children with childhood cancers and other life-threatening illnesses.

As a nonprofit organization, St. Jude’s depends on events such as the Dream Home Giveaway for ongoing financial support. Held in 30 locations around the nation this year, the Dream Home Giveaway raffles off a new home built by contractors who donate time and materials to the project. Tickets are $100 each and only a limited number are sold in each city. All proceeds go to St. Jude.

For the second consecutive year, the builder of the Dream Home, Nies Homes, has partnered with St. Jude to bring the successful fundraiser to Wichita, Kan. After selling more than 6,500 tickets in just six days for a total donation of $650,000 in 2016, Nies Homes was eager to do its part once again in 2017. This year’s goal was to sell 8,500 tickets at $100 apiece for a total donation of $850,000. The 3,814-square-foot Dream Home will be awarded in a live ceremony on May 17.

Bella Bush, the face of Wichita’s St. Jude Dream Home, is a true example of determination and positivity in the face of almost insurmountable odds. At 18 months old, Bella was diagnosed with a tumor on her optic nerve. She had surgery, but doctors were only able to remove a quarter of the tumor because of its location. Had doctors removed the entire tumor, she would have been blind. Bella soon began her first round of chemotherapy, which lasted a full year, sending her cancer into remission.

Unfortunately, in 2016, Bella’s family learned her tumor had returned. Just as Nies was breaking ground on Kansas’ first St. Jude Dream Home Giveaway house, Bella began treatment again and, despite several different types of chemo, the tumor continues to grow.

Nies Homes Vice President Curtis Cowgill is inspired by Bella’s determination. “When you think about St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and all it does to provide comfort to families and children facing the battle of their lives, it touches something in all of us,” Cowgill says.

“We are honored to be a part of the St. Jude Dream Home Giveaway builder team. This home-building experience is a community effort,” he continues. “And it’s humbling to build a home together knowing the result will help ensure that the work of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital can continue, bringing smiles and care to its young patients and families while finding cures to end childhood cancer.”

Dan Phillips, owner of R. Phillips Roofing Inc., has served the Wichita community for 36 years. After working on the first St. Jude Dream Home, Phillips was eager to participate again. Crews installed Atlas Summit 60 synthetic underlayment, followed by GlassMaster Performance Fiberglass Shingles. The roof was then capped with 50 squares of Pro-Cut Hip & Ridge shingles.

The roof of the St. Jude home included all of the components to qualify for the Atlas Signature Select Roofing System. The premium protection period includes full system coverage, non-prorated labor and materials, and tear-off and disposal costs when needed.

“The St. Jude Dream Home represents proof that good people can come together for something that is much bigger than any one of us,” Phillips says. “I made sure to get four of my best guys to lay down the roof in just over a day. We’re all very proud of the work we accomplished.”

Atlas Roofing is proud to be part of St. Jude’s mission and congratulates Nies Homes and R. Phillips Roofing for their support of the St. Jude Dream Home. The quality roofing materials will help the home protect its occupants and also be a symbol of hope for children afflicted by serious illnesses.

Righting Wrongs

Tink and Bobbye Calfee were devastated when they realized they were victims of an $11,000 roofing scam. The couple put their trust in a contractor who took their money and promised to fix their roof after a series of storms ripped through their Conroe, Texas, neighborhood in May 2016.

Today, the Calfees and other swindled homeowners in their neighborhood have new roofs over their heads thanks to Always Great Service (AGS) of Cypress, Texas, Atlas Roofing and StormScamHelp.com. The new roofs were provided to the homeowners free of charge.

“My husband has heart trouble, and I thought he was going to have a heart attack worrying so about it,” Bobbye Calfee says. “It’s been marvelous that somebody came in and helped us.”

Local media documented the homeowners’ plight and the assistance offered by StormScamHelp.com, a watchdog organization founded by Genesis Contractor Solutions (GCS), based in Englewood, Colo. GCS partnered with Atlas Roofing and AGS to put new roofs on each of the affected homes. Atlas Roofing donated the shingles while AGS provided the labor.

Diane Peoples, Atlas Roofing’s marketing and communications manager, traveled to the community in Conroe and says “This was a coordinated effort to make things right and give back to the community.”

Wrist Lanyard Systems Increase Productivity

The wrist lanyard systems can safely handle tools up to 5 pounds.

The wrist lanyard systems can safely handle tools up to 5 pounds.

Gear Keeper’s two wrist lanyard systems can safely handle tools up to 5 pounds. Productivity is increased by the company’s patented Quick Connect tool attachment connecting devices that permit connection/disconnection of tools. Users can change out and use many tools with one lanyard by fitting additional male connectors to all tools being used and merely unclick one tool and attach another.  

The wrist lanyards are valuable when the task involves climbing or working at heights or when a short drop distance is required. Unlike standard wrist lanyards, the Gear Keeper tethering systems insures at-heights safety. 

The two Gear Keeper wrist lanyard systems are models TL1-2007 and TL1-2008 Retractable Wrist Lanyards. Both models offer nylon webbing Velcro wrist attachment straps. They are available in safety orange with serial numbers to satisfy traceability standards. Both models also offer additional lanyard attachments for multiple tool use. 

The TL1-2007 Deluxe Wrist Lanyard has a side release disconnect barrel lock offering 10-inch extended length. The wrist lanyard comes complete with model #ACO-0206, Barrel Lock Nylon lanyard connector. The TL1-2008 Deluxe Wrist Lanyard, which also has a 10-inch extended length comes with the model #ACO-0207 Stainless Steel Snap Lanyard connector. 

For more information about Gear Keeper Retractable and Non-Retractable Wrist Lanyard Systems or any of the companyʼs other tethering products call (888) 588-9981 or visit the website.  

ARMA Presents Public Partnership Award

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has announced that the Miami-Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources Department is the recipient of the 2017 ARMA Public Partnership Award. 

The award, given only for the recognition of partnerships formed with ARMA, recognizes the collaboration between Miami-Dade and ARMA to update the Florida Building Code requirements in high wind zones. Aaron R. Phillips, corporate director of Technical Services at TAMKO Building Products Inc. and chair of the ARMA Codes Steering Group, presented the award to Michael Goolsby, Miami-Dade Board and Code Administration Division director. In addition, ARMA presented the staff members who worked on the project with individual certificates.

Over the past two years, Miami-Dade staff and ARMA representatives worked on updates to the roofing requirements for the High Velocity Hurricane Zone (HVHZ), during numerous meetings and conference calls to review the current provisions, develop code proposals and manage the Florida Building Commission process.

The collaboration spanned hundreds of hours to remove outdated references and coordinate the HVHZ protocols with national testing requirements. Revisions approved as a result of this effort will streamline the certification process for roofing manufacturers when launching new products or renewing existing approvals and help Miami-Dade staff manage their product approval review process.

“Miami-Dade staff members are grateful for ARMA’s recognition of our joint effort,” says Goolsby. “It was only through our shared goal that we were able to get it done.”

ARMA and Miami-Dade representatives attended the Florida Building Commission’s Rule Development Workshop in Ocala as the Commission approved the final changes. The 2017 Florida Building Code, scheduled for launch on January 1, 2018, will include every one of the dozens of proposals and public comments jointly submitted by ARMA and Miami-Dade.

“This kind of cooperation between a public regulator and a private trade association is rare enough,” says ARMA’s vice president of Code and Regulatory Compliance, Michael Fischer. “The positive results are unprecedented.”   
 
Phillips noted that the efforts aren’t necessarily over. “We hope to build on this partnership and continue to improve the product approval process during future Florida code updates,” he says.
 
ARMA’s efforts in the codes, standards, and technical arenas translate to effective minimum code requirements, useful material standards, and educational resources for the industry.  Technical manuals, installation guides, Fast Facts, and technical bulletins are available on ARMA’s website and provide best practices for a variety of roofing topics.  Visit the website for access to all of these materials and more.

Composite Shake Roofing Tiles Replace Cedar Shingles

The Schwabs chose DaVinci Roofscapes composite shake roofing tiles for their re-roofing project.

The Schwabs chose DaVinci Roofscapes composite shake roofing tiles for their re-roofing project.

It can be tiring to own real cedar shake roofing. There are cedar roof shingles that need replacing from time to time due to popping or warping, and insect infestations need to be dealt with regularly.

For Dave and Jeanne Schwab, the effort of cleaning and applying shake oil to their massive cedar shake roof every five years or so eventually wore them down. They loved the look of shake on their home in Mt. Vernon, Wash., but hated the maintenance aspects.

“Our home was built in 1993, and there’s a lot of roofing involved in its design,” says Dave Schwab. “Eventually the roof really needed to be replaced. We liked how the natural cedar roofing looked on the house, but when we went shopping for a new roof we wanted a cedar shake alternative.”

THE RE-ROOFING PROJECT

The Schwabs discovered DaVinci Roofscapes composite shake roofing tiles and were sold. “The authentic appearance of the DaVinci fake cedar shake sold us right away,” says Schwab.

“Then you add in the Class A Fire Rating, the impact resistance and the lifetime limited warranty and it was easy to make our decision.”

The large roof on the Schwab home is broken up visually by seven skylights and the addition of decorative European-designed ridge vents. The DaVinci Multi-Width roof, in the Mountain blend, now covers the home and attached three-car garage.

The house was re-roofed in 2015. “Every time I pull up to the house I still get a ‘wow’ experience,” says Schwab. “The color is perfect for our home. It looks so natural, yet we know we’ll never again have to spend another hour maintaining this roof. That’s the real joy of selecting synthetic shake shingles.”

The DaVinci Multi-Width roof, in Mountain Blend, covers the home and attached three-car garage.

The DaVinci Multi-Width roof, in Mountain Blend, covers the home and attached three-car garage.

THE SEQUEL

The Schwabs were inspired to build an outdoor shed by the cover of an old issue of Country Living magazine. “When we saw this potting shed on the magazine cover in 2002, we knew the style matched our home perfectly,” says Dave Schwab. “We purchased the plans from the magazine and constructed it in 2004 to hold our snow blower, bicycles, lawn mower and gardening tools.”

In 2016, the real shake shingles on the shed needed replacing, and the Schwabs knew exactly what they wanted to do.

“It was very exciting to complete this DIY project a decade ago,” Jeanne Schwab says. “We wired it with electricity, and added insulation and pine tongue and groove. For the floor, we put in a black and white checkered vinyl. Now, up on the roof we’ve replaced the shake and added DaVinci simulated shake roofing that matches our home. We even used it on top of the cupola.”

“Now we have two structures on our property with unified looks,” says Dave Schwab. “Having the potting shed completed gives us a great deal of satisfaction … and we’re sure the new DaVinci roof will serve us well for many years to come.”

Roof Materials

Roof System Manufacturer: DaVinci Roofscapes

Single-Component Butyl Provides a Permanent Seal Without Hardening

The butyl sealant can be used in a variety of metal roof applications where a low modulus sealant is desired.

The butyl sealant can be used in a variety of metal roof applications where a low modulus sealant is desired.

R.M. Lucas Co. has added a single-component, non-skinning butyl rubber sealant to its product line. Lucas #8660 provides adhesion and a permanent seal between concealed end laps, metal roof panels, standing-seam roof panels, ridge caps, wall panels and other applications where a non-hardening weather seal is desired. This product is also ideal for use with OEM and shop-assembled metal details.

According to the manufacturer, Lucas #8660 creates a non-hardening, weathertight seal. Designed as a non-skinning, non-sag sealant, the product exhibits high moisture resistance, with an exceptional ability to absorb sound and movement. Lucas #8660 comes in a neutral color, guns easily in cold or hot weather, and is packaged in 10-ounce fiber cartridges, 12 per case.

“Lucas #8660 won’t stain substrates and exhibits primerless adhesion to most roofing and building materials, including Kynar,” says Jason Morris, technical sales representative for Lucas. “The product is easy to gun and tool, even in cold weather, and is also self-healing.”

The butyl sealant can be used in a variety of metal roof applications where a low modulus sealant is desired, including metal roof panels, ribs, standing seams, and ridge cap flashing, as well as metal wall panels. Lucas #8660 is also recommended for OEM trailer and RV application, installation of walk-in coolers and freezers, and as a vapor barrier sealant. In addition, Lucas #8660 can be used as a sound-deadening sealant in installation of acoustical ceilings as well as both gypsum and metal wall panels. It is not designed for use as a single-ply roofing adhesive or lap adhesive.

When applying the sealant, the surface to be sealed must be dry and free of dirt or loose corrosion particles. A primer is not needed. Simply apply the sealant to the area as desired. Tooling is not normally necessary. The product can be cleaned with Lucas #125 Safe Solve. It also has a long shelf life, remaining active two years from the date of manufacture.

“We feel that this will be an excellent addition to our product line whether you are restoring, renovating or maintaining building structures,” states Morris.

Photo: McElroy Metal

Shingle Line Adds to Color Portfolio

IKO Dynasty shingles with ArmourZone adds three colors to its color portfolio.

IKO Dynasty shingles with ArmourZone adds three colors to its color portfolio.

The IKO Dynasty shingles with ArmourZone color portfolio provides three additional colors: Driftshake, Brownstone and Frostone Grey.

Contractors can enjoy eleven color blends offered in the IKO Dynasty shingle line, along with ease-of-installation and wind-resistance benefits thanks to the ArmourZone technology.

The three colors are engineered using a color blend technology process that enhances any roofscape.

Coordinating IKO Hip and Ridge Cap Shingles, both standard and high profile (in limited markets), are also available to help protect vulnerable roof areas and to accentuate the roofline. Complementary colors for the three Dynasty swatches include Driftwood (for Driftshake), Dual Brown (for Brownstone) and Dual Grey (for Frostone Grey).

Ease of Installation & Wind Resistance

IKO Dynasty shingles also offer ease of installation thanks to ArmourZone, an enlarged nailing area that makes project installation more accurate.

Two nailing lines that are 1-1/4-inches apart identify the ArmourZone, which is 40 percent wider than IKO’s standard 7/8-inch roofing shingle nailing zones and also guides installers for correct nail placement. Plus, Dynasty shingles require only four nails per shingle for installation compared with the typical six nails for most traditional shingles. Be sure to check your local building code for specific nailing requirements in your area.

Additionally, the reinforced woven band within the ArmourZone helps provide resistance to high winds and carry a 130 miles-per-hour wind limited warranty. The ArmourZone also provides fastening strength over a large surface area of the shingle, helping to resist nail heads from pulling through the shingle in high winds.

For more information about IKO’s Dynasty shingles with ArmourZone and the limited warranty, and its complete portfolio of roofing products and accessories, visit the IKO website.

Graduates of NRCA University’s Future Executives Institute Are Announced

The NRCA University’s Future Executives Institute (FEI) has announced its graduates for 2017. Graduates were recognized during NRCA’s Awards Ceremony and Cocktail Reception held during NRCA’s 130th Annual Convention in Las Vegas.

FEI is a three-year program taught by Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management professors, industry leaders and field experts. It offers a look at business theory and practice. Those who attend benefit from industry networking opportunities while developing their understanding of skills in leading, managing and communicating.

FEI’s 2017 graduates:

For more information about FEI or to apply for the program, visit here.

Malarkey Roofing Products Introduces Regional Manager

Malarkey Roofing Products has announced Glenn North as South Central Regional Manager.
 
“We are excited to have Glenn join our team,” says Rich Robbins, vice president of sales & marketing at Malarkey. “His skills and decades of experience in the roofing industry will help our team continue to grow in this part of the country,” adds Robbins. 
 
Mr. North’s responsibilities will include sales management in the South Central region of the U.S.  A Texas native, Glenn joins Malarkey with a background of roofing construction, distribution, and manufacturing in the region. Most recently, he served as vice president and general manager of Lon Smith Roofing in Austin. Prior, Glenn worked in sales for another roofing products manufacturer for more than a decade in Dallas and Sarasota, Fla.
 
Mr. North is fulfilling the position previously held by Craig Lott, who is now national accounts manager for Malarkey.