Registration Is Open for Construct 2017

Registration is now open for CONSTRUCT, a national event designed to provide the commercial building team with products and education solutions. This year’s event is taking place Sept. 13-15, 2017, at the Rhode Island Convention Center in Providence, R.I.  Online registration is available here.
 
CONSTRUCT Education Advisory Council Member, Nina Giglio, FCSI, CCS of Perkins and Eastman says, “This is an event that you won’t want to miss.  What an opportunity to visit and explore Providence, R.I., a city with architectural interest, restaurants and charm.  At the same time, CONSTRUCT also will feature a revamped education program with presentations that you can’t get just anywhere, not to mention the ability to achieve learning units for AIA, CSI, GBCI, and this year BOMI and ICC, and of course live product demonstrations in the Learning Pavilion, and networking events like the Newcomer Reception and the CSI Honor and Awards.”
 
Covering everything from air barriers to fire protection systems, coatings to architectural hardware, and much more, the Exhibit Hall will be packed with 200+ exhibitors spanning over 28,000+ net square feet. Exhibiting companies will showcase products, services and technologies for commercial building industry professionals who design, build, renovate or operate in the built environment.  
 
In addition to the manufacturer and supplier booths, participants can earn over a year’s worth of CEUs, including 18.5 AIA LUs/HSW, 17 BOMI CPDs, and .18 ICC CEUs.  GBCI credits are also available and all sessions qualify for CSI continuing education.  CONSTRUCT offers a solutions-based education program featuring 40+ new sessions, led by over 55 speakers.  Defined into tracks for architects/designers, specifiers, contractors, building owners/managers, project managers, engineers, product reps, young professionals and students.
 
A few notable sessions:

     

  • Keynote: Multiple Agendas with Thom Mayne, FAIA
  • Specifications in the Age of Smart Cities – How Specs Are Changing the World with Paul Doherty, AIA
  • What is a Building Enclosure? with Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng., ASHRAE Fellow
  • Hands-On Demo of Detailing for a Continuous Air, Water, & Thermal Assembly with Tiffany Coppock, AIA, NCARB, CSI, CDT, LEED AP, ASTM, RCI, EDAC
  • Let’s Fix Construction: An Interactive Luncheon with Cherise Lakeside, CSI, CDT & Eric D. Lussier CSI, CDT
  • Specifying Target Value Delivery with Beth Stroshane, CSI, CCS, LEED AP
  • Understanding & Ending Moisture-Related Flooring Problems with Peter Craig, FACI, FICRI, CCSMTT and Scott Tarr, PE, FACI, CCSMTT
  • TCNA & ANSI: Specifying Successful Tile & Stone Systems by the Book with Jim Whitfield, FCSI, CCPR, LEED AP
  • AIA Contract Documents 2017 with Lane J. Beougher, FAIA, FCSI, NCARB, Assoc. DBIA, LEED BD+C, GGP and Salvatore Verrastro, CSI, CCS, CCCA
  • Selling with Guide Specifications with Michael Chambers, FAIA, FCSI

 
Attendees can also earn credits in the learning lounges and learning pavilion on the expo floor and via off-site technical tours.  
 
CONSTRUCT also offers a variety of options for young professionals (35 and younger) and students who are looking to learn more about the industry, network, and have fun with their peers.  
 
In addition, CONSTRUCT 2017 is the place to get connected with old friends and make new ones with available networking options including: Newcomer Reception, CSI Welcome Reception, CSI Young Professionals Mixer, and CSI Night Out.
 
Those interested in attending can register online to save time and money.
 
The Full Education Package includes access to the education program, the Exhibit Hall, Show Floor Happy Hours, the General Session/Keynote, $28 in Concession Cash and CSI Night Out. 
 
The Exhibit Hall Only option includes access to the Exhibit Hall, Show Floor Happy Hours and the General Session/Keynote.  
 
Individual session pricing and options for students and young professionals are also available.
 
To register or for more information, visit the website or call (866) 475-6707. 

Composite Slate Roof Offers Curb Appeal

 A composite slate roof was chosen to help the facility fit in with the surrounding area.

A composite slate roof was chosen to help the facility fit in with the surrounding area.

Jack Lucks has an “architectural eye.” His dedication to creating attention-grabbing projects has served him well during the past 43 years as he makes design and product decisions related to a variety of projects with different architectural styles.

In recent years Lucks and his group, Continental Real Estate Companies, have focused on the creation of senior/assisted living facilities. A recently opened facility in Granville, Ohio, has been well received, and Lucks, a founding partner with the group, credits the distinctive look of the building’s composite slate roof as a key to its curb appeal.

Roof Materials

The design goals included integrating the building with the surrounding area. “Granville is an older town, founded in the early 1800s,” Lucks notes. “There are lots of slate roofs in town that complement the Greek Revival style of this area. Having a composite slate roof on our facility that so perfectly replicates real slate was a smart decision.”

A composite slate roof from DaVinci Roofscapes was chosen for the project. “The black Bellaforté Slate roof has the aesthetic look we wanted without the weight of real slate,” says Lucks.

Lucks points out that the Middleton project is a single-story building with a roof that’s highly visible from the street. “When you look at this building, half of what you see is the roof,” he says. “That made the roofing decision especially important for us.”

According to Lucks he has been “enormously pleased” with the authentic look of the composite slate roof. “It’s not an exaggeration to say that the DaVinci roof has helped us gain tenants,” he says. “People look at the structure, see the brick and ‘slate’ exterior. It makes them take that crucial step to walk in our door.”

With 94 rooms, Middleton offers six levels of support for residents at the 92,000-square-foot structure. The facility provides restaurant-style dining, daily activities, an on-site theatre and nature paths, as well as laundry and housekeeping services, 24-hour licensed nurses and a beauty salon. “America’s population is aging,” says Lucks. “Our facilities help Americans age gracefully in beautiful settings that cater to their changing needs.”

Team

Roof System Manufacturer: DaVinci Roofscapes

Photo: DaVinci Roofscapes

Re-Roofing Project Protects Medical Center’s Critical Interior Space

The medical center is pleased with the decision to use FiberTite to protect their facility and trusts the roof system will be durable and reliable for many years to come.

The medical center is pleased with the decision to use FiberTite to protect their facility and trusts the roof system will be durable and reliable for many years to come.

Maintaining the building envelope is essential to the success of a facility with critical interior space. This is especially true with hospitals and medical centers, where facility managers need to be on top of the building envelope integrity so patients and valuable assets are protected.

When the staff at an acute care medical facility in Florida realized the building’s existing roof was reaching the end of its service life, they knew they had to take action right away. The medical center offers a 24-hour emergency department, surgical services and various other outpatient services, and avoiding interruptions caused by roof leaks was critical. Hospital officials sought out a roofing consultant to offer a recommendation for the best roofing system to protect the facility.

McEnany Roofing, located in Tampa, Fla., has been providing commercial and industrial roofing solutions for more than 27 years. “We worked on the medical facility’s behalf to recommend a roofing system for this environment,” says Mark Sloat, vice president and senior estimator at McEnany Roofing. “We used the services of an engineer to conduct an uplift test to help us determine the best roof to suit their needs.”

Roof Materials

After all the testing and research was complete, McEnany Roofing concluded that a FiberTite Roofing System was the best choice. The proven performance advantages in puncture resistance, durability, wind uplift and severe weather protection supported McEnany Roofing’s recommendation and after careful review of the data, the medical facility agreed. In 2016, McEnany Roofing installed more than 130,000 square feet of Elvaloy KEE membrane on the main hospital and two adjacent medical buildings.

Roof Report

The sensitive environment of the hospital setting also had to be taken into account. The water-based adhesive used to adhere the 45-mil FiberTite Fleeceback membrane on the upper roof of the main hospital helped mitigate odor. Other areas of the hospital had 45-mil FiberTite-SM installed using the mechanically attached securement. Both processes minimized disruption and allowed the medical center to maintain strict standards of patient care during installation. The medical center is pleased with the decision to use FiberTite to protect their facility and trusts the roof system will be durable and reliable for many years to come.

Team

ROOFING CONTRACTOR: McEnany Roofing, Tampa, Fla.
ROOF SYSTEM MANUFACTURER: FiberTite Roofing Systems, Seaman Corp., Wooster, Ohio

Photo: FiberTite Roofing Systems

TPO System Delivers Energy Efficiency for Company Headquarters

TurnKey Corrections constructed a new 115,000-square-foot in facility in River Falls, Wis.

TurnKey Corrections constructed a new 115,000-square-foot in facility in River Falls, Wis.

If you want it done right, do it yourself. Company owners Todd Westby and Tim Westby take a hands-on approach to running TurnKey Corrections, the River Falls, Wisconsin-based company that provides commissary and jail management services to county corrections facilities nationwide. The Westby brothers also take pride in the fact that TurnKey manufactures the kiosks it provides to its clients and develops and owns the proprietary software used to run them.

So, it’s perhaps not surprising that, when building the company’s new headquarters, Todd Westby, the company’s CEO, founder and general manager, served as the general contractor. Or that he had definite ideas regarding the roofing system that would be installed. Or that he was more than willing to get his hands dirty during the installation process.

Founded in 1998, TurnKey Corrections helps corrections facilities streamline and lower the cost of delivering a variety services to inmates, including commissary, email and email-to-text communication, video visitation, law library access, and paperless intra-facility communication and documentation. Following several years of robust growth, the company had outgrown its three existing buildings. So, it constructed a new 115,000-square-foot facility to bring all operations, including 50,000 square feet of office space and a 65,000 square-foot warehouse where commissary items are stored prior to shipment to corrections facilities, under a single roof and accommodate future success.

“We wanted to be involved in the project from beginning to end so we knew what we were getting and how it was built,” Todd Westby says of the decision to keep construction management in-house. “We wanted to know about anything and everything that was being built for the company in this building.”

In planning the project, Westby initially set two key criteria for the roofing system: that the building would be made watertight as quickly as possible so concrete slab pours and other interior work could be completed, and that the roof would be covered by a warranty of at least 20 years. The design-build firm’s initial plans called for a ballasted EPDM roofing system, but Rex Greenwald, president of roofing contractor TEREX Roofing & Sheet Metal LLC of Minneapolis, suggested a white TPO system, noting that it would meet the quick installation and warranty goals while also enhancing the building’s energy efficiency. Westby was intrigued and, after some research, agreed to the recommendation. In addition to helping reduce cooling costs during summer months, the reflective surface would allow a blanket of snow to remain on the roof during winter months to provide additional insulation.

The TPO roofing system was constructed over a 22-gauge metal fabricated roof deck.

The TPO roofing system was constructed over a 22-gauge metal fabricated roof deck.

The Roof System

The TPO roofing system included a 22-gauge metal fabricated roof deck; two 2.5-inch-thick layers of Poly ISO insulation from Mule-Hide Products Co., with tapered insulation saddles and crickets to aid drainage; and 811 squares of 60-mil white TPO membrane from Mule-Hide Products Co. The insulation and membrane were mechanically attached using the RhinoBond System from OMG Roofing Products. Cast iron roof drains, designed and installed by a plumber, were used rather than scuppers and downspouts—a practice that the TEREX team strongly recommends to prevent freezing during the cold Upper Midwest winters. Walkways lead to the mechanical units, protecting the membrane from damage when maintenance personnel need to access the equipment.

The TEREX team finds the RhinoBond System to be the most efficient and economical attachment method for TPO systems. Specially coated metal plates are used to fasten the insulation to the roof deck and then an electromagnetic welder is used to attach the membrane to the plates. The membrane is not penetrated, eliminating a potential entry point for moisture. And while other mechanical attachment methods require the crew to seam as they go, the RhinoBond System allows them to lay the entire membrane (a task which must be completed in good weather conditions) at once and go back later to induction weld the seams and plates, which can be done when Mother Nature is slightly less cooperative.

Greenwald estimates that the switch from the originally specified ballasted EPDM system to the TPO roofing system and RhinoBond System shaved at least 10 percent off the installation time and reduced the roof weight by 10 pounds per square foot.

Having Westby on-site as the general contractor also sped up the project considerably, Greenwald notes. “He was a huge asset to all of the subcontractors,” he explains. “We could get construction questions answered quickly and could talk through issues and procedures on a timely basis.”

And the most memorable moment in the project for Greenwald was seeing Westby working side-by-side with his crew. “One day we had a delivery truck show up, and Todd jumped on the forklift and helped us unload the truck.”

As sought from the project’s outset, the roofing system is backed by a 20-year, no-dollar-limit labor and material warranty.

With one winter of use in the rearview mirror, the roofing system has exceeded Westby’s expectations. Warehouse space was doubled, but heating costs have been cut in half. The 10-unit heating system also is able to keep the warehouse a uniform temperature, without the cold spots that were common in the old building.

“It really is a beautiful, very efficient and organized-looking roof,” Greenwald says.

Silicone Sealant Repairs Roofs, Masonry and Sheet Metal

The 100 percent Silicone Sealant seals and repairs roofs, masonry, architectural sheet metal, and metal roof seams and fasteners.

The 100 percent Silicone Sealant seals and repairs roofs, masonry, architectural sheet metal, and metal roof seams and fasteners.

Mule-Hide Products Co. has added 100 percent Silicone Sealant choices to its Silicone Roof Coating System, expanding the color offering to include clear and the packaging options to include 10-ounce tubes.
 
100 percent Silicone Sealant is a mastic version of the Mule-Hide 100 percent Silicone Roof Coating. It is a moisture-cure silicone sealant designed for use in sealing and repairing roofs, masonry, architectural sheet metal, and metal roof seams and fasteners. 
 
The addition of clear sealant allows contractors to complete projects that would otherwise require color-matching. It is available packaged in tubes only.

In addition to clear, the tubes are available filled with white sealant. The plastic cartridges are an option for use in smaller applications or when precision is required. They also can be submerged under water to repair roof leaks, gutters and downspouts.
 
100 percent Silicone Sealant provides adhesion to concrete, masonry, polyurethane foam, EPDM membranes, TPO membranes, aged PVC membranes, aged acrylic coatings, granular cap sheets, wood, metals, Kynar finishes and most other building materials. When using 100 percent Silicone Sealant with a TPO roof membrane, Mule-Hide Si TPO Primer must be applied first. 
 
The sealant has minimal odor, making it contractor- and building-occupant-friendly. Its volatile organic compound (VOC) content of less than 10 grams per liter makes it acceptable for use in areas with VOC restrictions. It does not corrode metals.
 

NRCA Urges Participation in National Roofing Week

To increase recognition of the significance of roofs, stress the value of professional roofing contractors, bring attention to the value of a career in roofing and promote the good deeds of the industry, the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) is urging communities throughout the U.S. to recognize National Roofing Week taking place June 4-10.

The roof is one of the components of a structure, yet it often is taken for granted until it falls into disrepair. During National Roofing Week, NRCA encourages its members to participate by engaging in their communities and informing the public about the role roofs and professional roofing contractors play in every community.

Most roof systems last more than 20 years; however, routine evaluation and maintenance is necessary to extend its life and keep overall costs down. NRCA urges consumers to observe National Roofing Week by paying attention to wear and tear on their roof systems and to make informed decisions about roof system maintenance and replacement.

“Professional roofing contractors play a role in every community, and National Roofing Week provides the roofing industry the opportunity to demonstrate the importance of the work we do,” says NRCA Chairman of the Board Dennis Conway. “I look forward to sharing the roofing industry’s stories of professional excellence and charitable giving during National Roofing Week.”

NRCA will recognize National Roofing Week by highlighting the work, training and good deeds of its members and their employees on its various social media outlets. The winners of NRCA’s fourth annual children’s art contest will also be announced. Children in grades 1-8, who are relatives of NRCA members and their employees submitted artwork depicting the importance of roofs and the professional roofing contractor.

Contest winners will have their artwork featured on all National Roofing Week material and additional promotional material to be displayed at industry events throughout the year, including the 2018 International Roofing Expo and NRCA’s 131th Annual Convention in New Orleans.

Additional information about National Roofing Week can be found here.

Contractors and Manufacturers Team Up to Make Life Better

In a small town in Florida, a disabled Army vet received help when he was on the verge of losing his home because he couldn’t afford a new roof. In Kansas, proceeds from the raffle of a new home went to help fight childhood cancer. In Texas, victims of a damaging storm and unscrupulous swindlers had new roofs installed and their faith in people restored.

In each case, Atlas Roofing and local contractors stepped in to nail shingles and improve people’s lives, just as they do across the nation on a regular basis.

“A well-installed roof with quality roofing products can represent a big improvement in someone’s life,” says Kirk Villar, vice president of sales and marketing, roof shingles and underlayment at Atlas Roofing Corporation. “Shingles can help build communities, and we are proud to partner with roofing contractors to help make that happen.”

Here are three stories of Atlas Roofing and local contractors making life better for people who needed help.

Assisting a Veteran

On a cul-de-sac in Ocoee, Fla., neighbors still take care of one another. Art Burkholder, a 74-year-old retired and disabled veteran, recently discovered that human kindness, compassion and charity are still alive and well in our world.

Burkholder, a former Army sergeant, has lived in his home since 1989. He suffered a stroke in 1998 and a heart attack just two years later. Now Burkholder, who lives on a modest fixed income, is battling cancer.

When Burkholder’s home insurance lapsed, he couldn’t get it renewed without having a new roof installed. And without insurance, his bank placed him into a state of forced foreclosure.

He couldn’t afford to fix the roof, and he couldn’t afford to move. Burkholder received the foreclosure notice in August of 2016. In a panic, he finally went to neighbor Tami Kneidinger for help.

Those who live on Burkholder’s street are like a close-knit family. Kneidinger, who lived next door to Burkholder for 15 years, and his other neighbors put together a GoFundMe campaign to raise the money needed to install a new roof. They wanted to keep him at home, near the people who care about him.

The campaign raised about a third of what was needed to fix Burkholder’s roof—nowhere near the goal. So Kneidinger and another neighbor started writing letters asking for help.

One of the letters came to the attention of Victor Osage of G & A Certified Roofing in Winter Park, Fla., and Colin Hobbs of Atlas Roofing, who agreed to supply Burkholder with 33 squares of shingles directly from Atlas.

Osage and his G & A Roofing team replaced the roof in November 2016. The crew fixed several leaking deck boards, cut away low-lying tree branches and installed Atlas Pinnacle Pristine asphalt shingles and Summit 60 synthetic underlayment.

“It was an honor to be able to do this for Mr. Burkholder,” Osage says. “He is a wonderful man and obviously loved by his entire neighborhood.”

Thanks to G & A Certified Roofing and Atlas Roofing, together with Kneidinger and all of Burkholder’s generous neighbors, the Army vet is no longer facing foreclosure. “If it weren’t for Atlas, none of this would have worked out,” says Kneidinger.

Keeping Dreams Alive

Since 1962, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has devoted itself to finding cures for diseases and treating sick children. Founded by stage and screen comedian Danny Thomas and two friends on the premise that “no child should die in the dawn of life,” discoveries at St. Jude’s have changed the way doctors treat children with childhood cancers and other life-threatening illnesses.

As a nonprofit organization, St. Jude’s depends on events such as the Dream Home Giveaway for ongoing financial support. Held in 30 locations around the nation this year, the Dream Home Giveaway raffles off a new home built by contractors who donate time and materials to the project. Tickets are $100 each and only a limited number are sold in each city. All proceeds go to St. Jude.

For the second consecutive year, the builder of the Dream Home, Nies Homes, has partnered with St. Jude to bring the successful fundraiser to Wichita, Kan. After selling more than 6,500 tickets in just six days for a total donation of $650,000 in 2016, Nies Homes was eager to do its part once again in 2017. This year’s goal was to sell 8,500 tickets at $100 apiece for a total donation of $850,000. The 3,814-square-foot Dream Home will be awarded in a live ceremony on May 17.

Bella Bush, the face of Wichita’s St. Jude Dream Home, is a true example of determination and positivity in the face of almost insurmountable odds. At 18 months old, Bella was diagnosed with a tumor on her optic nerve. She had surgery, but doctors were only able to remove a quarter of the tumor because of its location. Had doctors removed the entire tumor, she would have been blind. Bella soon began her first round of chemotherapy, which lasted a full year, sending her cancer into remission.

Unfortunately, in 2016, Bella’s family learned her tumor had returned. Just as Nies was breaking ground on Kansas’ first St. Jude Dream Home Giveaway house, Bella began treatment again and, despite several different types of chemo, the tumor continues to grow.

Nies Homes Vice President Curtis Cowgill is inspired by Bella’s determination. “When you think about St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and all it does to provide comfort to families and children facing the battle of their lives, it touches something in all of us,” Cowgill says.

“We are honored to be a part of the St. Jude Dream Home Giveaway builder team. This home-building experience is a community effort,” he continues. “And it’s humbling to build a home together knowing the result will help ensure that the work of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital can continue, bringing smiles and care to its young patients and families while finding cures to end childhood cancer.”

Dan Phillips, owner of R. Phillips Roofing Inc., has served the Wichita community for 36 years. After working on the first St. Jude Dream Home, Phillips was eager to participate again. Crews installed Atlas Summit 60 synthetic underlayment, followed by GlassMaster Performance Fiberglass Shingles. The roof was then capped with 50 squares of Pro-Cut Hip & Ridge shingles.

The roof of the St. Jude home included all of the components to qualify for the Atlas Signature Select Roofing System. The premium protection period includes full system coverage, non-prorated labor and materials, and tear-off and disposal costs when needed.

“The St. Jude Dream Home represents proof that good people can come together for something that is much bigger than any one of us,” Phillips says. “I made sure to get four of my best guys to lay down the roof in just over a day. We’re all very proud of the work we accomplished.”

Atlas Roofing is proud to be part of St. Jude’s mission and congratulates Nies Homes and R. Phillips Roofing for their support of the St. Jude Dream Home. The quality roofing materials will help the home protect its occupants and also be a symbol of hope for children afflicted by serious illnesses.

Righting Wrongs

Tink and Bobbye Calfee were devastated when they realized they were victims of an $11,000 roofing scam. The couple put their trust in a contractor who took their money and promised to fix their roof after a series of storms ripped through their Conroe, Texas, neighborhood in May 2016.

Today, the Calfees and other swindled homeowners in their neighborhood have new roofs over their heads thanks to Always Great Service (AGS) of Cypress, Texas, Atlas Roofing and StormScamHelp.com. The new roofs were provided to the homeowners free of charge.

“My husband has heart trouble, and I thought he was going to have a heart attack worrying so about it,” Bobbye Calfee says. “It’s been marvelous that somebody came in and helped us.”

Local media documented the homeowners’ plight and the assistance offered by StormScamHelp.com, a watchdog organization founded by Genesis Contractor Solutions (GCS), based in Englewood, Colo. GCS partnered with Atlas Roofing and AGS to put new roofs on each of the affected homes. Atlas Roofing donated the shingles while AGS provided the labor.

Diane Peoples, Atlas Roofing’s marketing and communications manager, traveled to the community in Conroe and says “This was a coordinated effort to make things right and give back to the community.”

Wrist Lanyard Systems Increase Productivity

The wrist lanyard systems can safely handle tools up to 5 pounds.

The wrist lanyard systems can safely handle tools up to 5 pounds.

Gear Keeper’s two wrist lanyard systems can safely handle tools up to 5 pounds. Productivity is increased by the company’s patented Quick Connect tool attachment connecting devices that permit connection/disconnection of tools. Users can change out and use many tools with one lanyard by fitting additional male connectors to all tools being used and merely unclick one tool and attach another.  

The wrist lanyards are valuable when the task involves climbing or working at heights or when a short drop distance is required. Unlike standard wrist lanyards, the Gear Keeper tethering systems insures at-heights safety. 

The two Gear Keeper wrist lanyard systems are models TL1-2007 and TL1-2008 Retractable Wrist Lanyards. Both models offer nylon webbing Velcro wrist attachment straps. They are available in safety orange with serial numbers to satisfy traceability standards. Both models also offer additional lanyard attachments for multiple tool use. 

The TL1-2007 Deluxe Wrist Lanyard has a side release disconnect barrel lock offering 10-inch extended length. The wrist lanyard comes complete with model #ACO-0206, Barrel Lock Nylon lanyard connector. The TL1-2008 Deluxe Wrist Lanyard, which also has a 10-inch extended length comes with the model #ACO-0207 Stainless Steel Snap Lanyard connector. 

For more information about Gear Keeper Retractable and Non-Retractable Wrist Lanyard Systems or any of the companyʼs other tethering products call (888) 588-9981 or visit the website.  

ARMA Presents Public Partnership Award

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has announced that the Miami-Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources Department is the recipient of the 2017 ARMA Public Partnership Award. 

The award, given only for the recognition of partnerships formed with ARMA, recognizes the collaboration between Miami-Dade and ARMA to update the Florida Building Code requirements in high wind zones. Aaron R. Phillips, corporate director of Technical Services at TAMKO Building Products Inc. and chair of the ARMA Codes Steering Group, presented the award to Michael Goolsby, Miami-Dade Board and Code Administration Division director. In addition, ARMA presented the staff members who worked on the project with individual certificates.

Over the past two years, Miami-Dade staff and ARMA representatives worked on updates to the roofing requirements for the High Velocity Hurricane Zone (HVHZ), during numerous meetings and conference calls to review the current provisions, develop code proposals and manage the Florida Building Commission process.

The collaboration spanned hundreds of hours to remove outdated references and coordinate the HVHZ protocols with national testing requirements. Revisions approved as a result of this effort will streamline the certification process for roofing manufacturers when launching new products or renewing existing approvals and help Miami-Dade staff manage their product approval review process.

“Miami-Dade staff members are grateful for ARMA’s recognition of our joint effort,” says Goolsby. “It was only through our shared goal that we were able to get it done.”

ARMA and Miami-Dade representatives attended the Florida Building Commission’s Rule Development Workshop in Ocala as the Commission approved the final changes. The 2017 Florida Building Code, scheduled for launch on January 1, 2018, will include every one of the dozens of proposals and public comments jointly submitted by ARMA and Miami-Dade.

“This kind of cooperation between a public regulator and a private trade association is rare enough,” says ARMA’s vice president of Code and Regulatory Compliance, Michael Fischer. “The positive results are unprecedented.”   
 
Phillips noted that the efforts aren’t necessarily over. “We hope to build on this partnership and continue to improve the product approval process during future Florida code updates,” he says.
 
ARMA’s efforts in the codes, standards, and technical arenas translate to effective minimum code requirements, useful material standards, and educational resources for the industry.  Technical manuals, installation guides, Fast Facts, and technical bulletins are available on ARMA’s website and provide best practices for a variety of roofing topics.  Visit the website for access to all of these materials and more.

Composite Shake Roofing Tiles Replace Cedar Shingles

The Schwabs chose DaVinci Roofscapes composite shake roofing tiles for their re-roofing project.

The Schwabs chose DaVinci Roofscapes composite shake roofing tiles for their re-roofing project.

It can be tiring to own real cedar shake roofing. There are cedar roof shingles that need replacing from time to time due to popping or warping, and insect infestations need to be dealt with regularly.

For Dave and Jeanne Schwab, the effort of cleaning and applying shake oil to their massive cedar shake roof every five years or so eventually wore them down. They loved the look of shake on their home in Mt. Vernon, Wash., but hated the maintenance aspects.

“Our home was built in 1993, and there’s a lot of roofing involved in its design,” says Dave Schwab. “Eventually the roof really needed to be replaced. We liked how the natural cedar roofing looked on the house, but when we went shopping for a new roof we wanted a cedar shake alternative.”

THE RE-ROOFING PROJECT

The Schwabs discovered DaVinci Roofscapes composite shake roofing tiles and were sold. “The authentic appearance of the DaVinci fake cedar shake sold us right away,” says Schwab.

“Then you add in the Class A Fire Rating, the impact resistance and the lifetime limited warranty and it was easy to make our decision.”

The large roof on the Schwab home is broken up visually by seven skylights and the addition of decorative European-designed ridge vents. The DaVinci Multi-Width roof, in the Mountain blend, now covers the home and attached three-car garage.

The house was re-roofed in 2015. “Every time I pull up to the house I still get a ‘wow’ experience,” says Schwab. “The color is perfect for our home. It looks so natural, yet we know we’ll never again have to spend another hour maintaining this roof. That’s the real joy of selecting synthetic shake shingles.”

The DaVinci Multi-Width roof, in Mountain Blend, covers the home and attached three-car garage.

The DaVinci Multi-Width roof, in Mountain Blend, covers the home and attached three-car garage.

THE SEQUEL

The Schwabs were inspired to build an outdoor shed by the cover of an old issue of Country Living magazine. “When we saw this potting shed on the magazine cover in 2002, we knew the style matched our home perfectly,” says Dave Schwab. “We purchased the plans from the magazine and constructed it in 2004 to hold our snow blower, bicycles, lawn mower and gardening tools.”

In 2016, the real shake shingles on the shed needed replacing, and the Schwabs knew exactly what they wanted to do.

“It was very exciting to complete this DIY project a decade ago,” Jeanne Schwab says. “We wired it with electricity, and added insulation and pine tongue and groove. For the floor, we put in a black and white checkered vinyl. Now, up on the roof we’ve replaced the shake and added DaVinci simulated shake roofing that matches our home. We even used it on top of the cupola.”

“Now we have two structures on our property with unified looks,” says Dave Schwab. “Having the potting shed completed gives us a great deal of satisfaction … and we’re sure the new DaVinci roof will serve us well for many years to come.”

Roof Materials

Roof System Manufacturer: DaVinci Roofscapes