Single-Component Butyl Provides a Permanent Seal Without Hardening

The butyl sealant can be used in a variety of metal roof applications where a low modulus sealant is desired.

The butyl sealant can be used in a variety of metal roof applications where a low modulus sealant is desired.

R.M. Lucas Co. has added a single-component, non-skinning butyl rubber sealant to its product line. Lucas #8660 provides adhesion and a permanent seal between concealed end laps, metal roof panels, standing-seam roof panels, ridge caps, wall panels and other applications where a non-hardening weather seal is desired. This product is also ideal for use with OEM and shop-assembled metal details.

According to the manufacturer, Lucas #8660 creates a non-hardening, weathertight seal. Designed as a non-skinning, non-sag sealant, the product exhibits high moisture resistance, with an exceptional ability to absorb sound and movement. Lucas #8660 comes in a neutral color, guns easily in cold or hot weather, and is packaged in 10-ounce fiber cartridges, 12 per case.

“Lucas #8660 won’t stain substrates and exhibits primerless adhesion to most roofing and building materials, including Kynar,” says Jason Morris, technical sales representative for Lucas. “The product is easy to gun and tool, even in cold weather, and is also self-healing.”

The butyl sealant can be used in a variety of metal roof applications where a low modulus sealant is desired, including metal roof panels, ribs, standing seams, and ridge cap flashing, as well as metal wall panels. Lucas #8660 is also recommended for OEM trailer and RV application, installation of walk-in coolers and freezers, and as a vapor barrier sealant. In addition, Lucas #8660 can be used as a sound-deadening sealant in installation of acoustical ceilings as well as both gypsum and metal wall panels. It is not designed for use as a single-ply roofing adhesive or lap adhesive.

When applying the sealant, the surface to be sealed must be dry and free of dirt or loose corrosion particles. A primer is not needed. Simply apply the sealant to the area as desired. Tooling is not normally necessary. The product can be cleaned with Lucas #125 Safe Solve. It also has a long shelf life, remaining active two years from the date of manufacture.

“We feel that this will be an excellent addition to our product line whether you are restoring, renovating or maintaining building structures,” states Morris.

Photo: McElroy Metal

Prevent Roof Fires During Torch-Down Projects

Torch-Down Safety While driving to work recently, I heard a news story on the radio: An unlicensed roofer was charged with causing a fire at a local apartment complex. When I arrived at the office, I Googled “fires caused by roofers.” The results included stories from across the nation:

  • Roofing crew blamed for a Chicago strip-mall fire.
  • Roofer’s torch likely cause of huge Arizona construction-site blaze.
  • Roofer’s blowtorch sparks a six-alarm fire in Hamilton Township, N.J.
  • Obviously, using an open-flame torch to install torch-down roofing systems can pose a fire risk. Torch-down roofing is a type of roofing that consists of layers of modified bitumen adhered to layers of fiberglass with a flame torch. Torch-down roofing is used only for flat or low-slope roofs. This process is popular with many contractors, mainly because of its ease of installation and its adaptability. With this system, the modified bitumen can bond tightly to metal flashings while the rubbery additives in the asphalt allow the roofing to expand and contract when other roofing systems may crack. In addition, roofers like torch-down roofing because it is easy to apply. Unfortunately, it can also be dangerous!

    It is easy to make a mistake with the torch that could result in disaster. Consider roofers that are torching down a roof and accidentally overheat something in the attic—insulation, for instance. They end their work for the day, not noticing the smoke coming out of soffit vents. Before long, that smoldering material in the attic heats up and starts a fire that quickly spreads throughout the dry, hot attic and, often, to the rest of the structure. 

    Regulations and Best Practices

    OSHA has developed standards that can help prevent these types of fires. Here are some of OSHA’s fire-protection and -prevention rules from the construction and general industry standards:

  • A fire extinguisher must be immediately accessible for all torch-down operations.
  • A fire extinguisher is needed within 50 feet of anywhere where more than 5 gallons of flammable or combustible liquids or 5 pounds of flammable gas are being used on the job site.
  • No one on a job site can be more than 100 feet from a fire extinguisher at all times.
  • There must be at least one fire extinguisher for 3,000 square feet of work area.
  • All flammable or combustible debris must be located well away from flammable liquids or gases.
  • Combustible scrap and debris must be removed regularly during the course of a job.
  • Piles of scrap and debris must be kept at least 10 feet from any building.
  • A fire watch person should be posted to immediately address any possible smolders or flare-ups.
  • The fire watch person should remain on post for 30 minutes after the torch-down job is finished for the day.
  • While the actions spelled out in these construction regulations are mandatory, roofing professionals should be aware that these are minimum requirements. The National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) and the Midwest Roofing Contractors Association (MRCA) have developed a roofing torch applicator certification program designed to reduce fire hazards during torch application of modified bitumen products. According to Harry Dietz, Director of Risk Management for NRCA, the Certified Torch Applicator (CERTA) program teaches installers to minimize the exposure of combustible structural materials to the heat and flame of the roofing torch. The program also spells out a number of safe practices that go well beyond OSHA’s regulations in dealing with roofing torch use. Among other program elements, these include:

  • The requirement for two 4A60BC fire extinguishers during torch work (more than 10 times the firefighting capability required under the OSHA rules).
  • A two-hour fire watch performed after the last torch has been extinguished.
  • Following these guidelines for fire prevention can protect roofing professionals and the public. It can also save roofers money and time, as well as protect contractors from lawsuits and other legal charges. 

    “In 2002, a leading insurer of roofing contractors had over $7 million in torch related claims in 33 occurrences prior to requiring CERTA for its insureds,” said Dietz. “In 2015, that same insurance company reported only one torch-related claim with a loss of less than $10,000.”

    Visit this site to learn more about OSHA’s Safety and Health Regulations for Construction, Welding and Cutting, Fire Prevention. To learn more about the Certified Torch Applicator (CERTA) program, click here.

    Coating System Makes Roofing and Cladding Appear Aged, Weathered

    McElroy Metal's Cor-Ten AZP Raw offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

    McElroy Metal’s Cor-Ten AZP Raw offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

    Bossier City, La.-based McElroy Metal’s Cor-Ten AZP Raw is new to the company’s product line, offering the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

    Cor-Ten AZP Raw is a fluoropolymer coating system that uses cool pigment technology that McElroy Metal applies over Galvalume-coated steel sheet. It’s available in a variety of McElroy Metal standing-seam and through-fastened panel profiles. The look of aged or weathered roofing and wall cladding is growing in popularity and used in commercial, residential and industrial applications. Cor-Ten AZP Raw provides the appearance of rusted metal with the advantages of a highly reflective PVDF coating.

    Cor-Ten AZP Raw is a fluoropolymer coating system that McElroy Metal applies over Galvalume-coated steel sheet.

    Cor-Ten AZP Raw is a fluoropolymer coating system that McElroy Metal applies over Galvalume-coated steel sheet.


    “We’re offering the appearance of weathered steel without having to wait for time and Mother Nature,” says Ken Gieseke, vice president of Marketing at McElroy Metal. “As soon as it’s installed, the weathered aesthetic is evident, attractive and durable. It’s sure to become a popular choice of architects and building owners seeking the look of weathered steel.”

    In 2005, U.S. Steel introduced Cor-Ten AZP prepainted steel sheet to provide architects, building owners and homeowners with an enhanced performance product to its Cor-Ten steel. McElroy Metal offers the moderately weathered Cor-Ten AZP Raw, a carefully crafted and engineered system to provide any roofing or cladding project with the authentic look of timelessness.

    Raw is produced by McElroy Metal in collaboration with Valspar and U.S. Steel.

    To learn more, visit here or call (318) 747-8000.

    PHOTOS: McElroy Metal

    Life Choices

    I have a younger brother who makes choices I don’t always understand. I’m quite a bit older than he is, so I like to share my experiences in the hopes of guiding him toward more productive options. Meanwhile, I wondered why my parents weren’t doing more to steer their youngest child and, in a moment of exasperation, I asked them. My mom responded that she and my dad believe we need to figure our lives out on our own. If we ask for help, they are willing to give it but they don’t want to micromanage our lives and decisions.

    I started thinking about what she said in relation to my own life choices. I remember when I decided to double major in English and history in college, my dad asked: “What are you going to do with that? Teach?” I said: “No. I’m going to write.” I knew, based on the look on his face, he was certain I’d never find gainful employment but he never said another word about it—not even on graduation day when I didn’t have a job or a place to live.

    It was the roofing industry that gave me my first opportunity. After applying for a job I found online, I moved from my home state of Iowa to the Chicago suburbs to begin writing for Professional Roofing magazine in late 2000. Writing about roofing wasn’t exactly what I had in mind when I dreamt of my career but, here I am, almost 17 years later and couldn’t be more grateful to this industry for all it has given me.

    Unfortunately, at this point in my career, I’m faced with another life choice. Those of you who have worked directly with me probably have noticed I rarely return phone calls or emails the same week, much less the same day! During the past five years, I’ve not only edited Roofing but also have been editing retrofit, a nationally circulated trade publication that focuses on the renovation of existing commercial, industrial and institutional buildings. Within the past year, both magazines have grown so much (a fantastic problem) that I’ve been having trouble keeping up.

    To make matters worse, I never have time to think through new ideas or accomplish the aspirations on my list that I know would make the magazines better. I suddenly realized I was doing a disservice to these magazines and to you, the readers. (Not to mention, having recently gotten married, I’m trying to establish a better work-life balance than I had while I was building my career.)

    Therefore, this is my last issue as editor in chief of Roofing. I’m thrilled my successor is Christopher K. King, a well-known writer in this industry who previously served as editor of Roofing Contractor magazine and has been writing articles for Roofing since 2015. (Read his “Special Report”, page 58, about how a community came together at the prompting of a roofing contractor to help a deserving couple restore their home.) I know Chris will do an excellent job taking Roofing to the next level and giving it the undivided attention it deserves.

    Again, I’m so thankful for the opportunities the roofing industry has given me. Consequently, I’ve decided to dedicate my final issue to the wonderful people and initiatives that make this industry so special. Enjoy!

    Kirberg Co. Receives BBB TORCH Award

    Kirberg Co. receives the 2016 BBB TORCH Award from the Better Business Bureau.

    Kirberg Co. receives the 2016 BBB TORCH Award from the Better Business Bureau.

    Kirberg Co., St. Louis, has received the 2016 BBB TORCH Award from the Better Business Bureau (BBB) serving eastern Missouri and southern Illinois. The award recognizes the company’s commitment to customer service through exceptional standards for ethical business practices.

    Laura Toledo, executive director of the Center for Women in Transition, St. Louis, nominated Kirberg Co. for the TORCH Award. In 2015, Kirberg Co. donated $36,000 in labor and materials to install a new roof at the Baker House, one of two transitional living facilities operated by the center.

    “We are all extremely grateful for the generous donation of a complete roof replacement from Kirberg in 2015,” Toledo states. “They also coordinated with other contractors to make sure the job was done well and at no cost to the agency. Kirberg has continued to support the mission of the Center for Women in Transition in numerous ways since then. Kirberg is an excellent company that is dedicated to its community.”

    Through practicing and promoting restorative justice, the Center for Women in Transition assists women in the criminal justice system to successfully transition back to their families and communities. The women are offered safe, stable housing through the center, as well as case management; life-skills instruction; guidance from volunteer mentors; and assistance with locating jobs and accessing other resources, such as substance-abuse treatment, medical and mental health care.

    Eric Kirberg, president of Kirberg Co., accepted the TORCH Award and says: “We were delighted to be able to help our friends at the Center for Women in Transition. The center provides a wonderful service here in town, and a new roof was badly needed. Now the apartment building will remain open to help hundreds of women for years to come.”

    Having provided nearly 100 years of service to the St. Louis community, Kirberg Co. installs nearly every type of roof system from slate and tile to flat-roof applications, vegetated and solar-power systems. With 90 field employees in St. Louis and approximately 50 in its branches, Kirberg Co. is committed to exceeding customer expectations.

    “Getting roofs done right the first time, that’s always been our motto,” Kirberg notes. “When our roofers are as good as they are, it’s easy to have good customer service when the work is almost perfect.”

    “BBB’s TORCH Awards celebrate exceptional companies with great customer service and ethics,” adds Scott Mosby, BBB board chair and chief executive of Mosby Building Arts, St. Louis. “Start with trust, honor the exceptional and learn from the best is our practice within St. Louis BBB. These companies and charities are examples to emulate for anyone who wants to be trusted in the marketplace.”

    Learn more about Kirberg Co. at the website; visit the BBB’s website.

    PHOTO: Kirberg Co.

    Four Ways Technology Boosted My Business

    We all know technology can benefit our businesses in many ways. The challenge is selecting the right technology from the hundreds of apps and programs out there.

    One area I needed technology to help with was providing a more seamless and efficient way of ordering materials for different jobs. Luckily my tech selection process was made a little easier when I learned my building materials supplier had an online program that could connect with the software I was already using.

    After talking with a sales representative, I was able to start working with the online program the very next week.

    Here’s how it works:

    • I can take aerial measurements— within 98 percent accuracy—of a roof without getting up there to take manual measurements.
    • The software uses the roof measurements and my distributor’s real-time pricing and products to create a materials list.
    • I turn my materials list into an order I electronically submit to my distributor from anywhere.

    After working with hundreds of orders since implementing this program in September 2015, I’ve experienced a 20 percent decrease in the time required to process orders for building materials and have seen more efficiency and accuracy in my projects.

    Here’s how this technology helped my business:

    Project Visualization

    Prior to taking advantage of this program, I placed orders based on information from project hand sketches. This would often lead to time-consuming follow-ups with my team to get more details or confirm information. Now I can electronically enter aerial roof and wall measurements, review and update them if necessary, and create materials lists.

    Having all our important information in an electronic tool is great! I no longer have to call my team to confirm handwritten information. This has resulted in my team being more efficient and reduced the number of ordering errors that come from misinterpreting information on a piece of paper.

    It’s also helpful to have an electronic tool where I can look up all my orders and see when they were placed and what items were included.

    Accessible Products

    Having technology that integrates with my supplier gives me the ability to access real-time products and pricing during and outside of business hours. This flexibility is so important. One evening I needed cost information on a skylight and all I had to do was go to my account to get the price through the online program.

    Manage Business 24/7

    From creating estimates to submitting orders, one of my favorite features of this technology is that it gives me the option to access projects 24/7. This lets me place many of my orders after business hours or on weekends, freeing up my time during the day to focus on other projects. I also no longer need to scan or fax orders, and I can quickly locate order information, like date ordered or materials lists, if I need to.

    Seamlessly Work With Business Contacts

    My business specializes in storm damage and roof replacement, so my team often works with other parties, such as insurance companies. Not only does the software I use integrate with my supplier’s program, it’s also a tool used by some insurance adjusters to measure and quote roof repairs. Being able to use the same or a similar type of software with different groups of people makes my job easier by streamlining our process.

    No matter what project we are working on, we have one goal: make the roof repair and replacement process easy for our customers. But that doesn’t mean things have to be harder for my team. And thanks to the technology we’ve incorporated into our workflow, it isn’t.

    It can be tough (and often overwhelming) trying to figure out what technology will be the best fit for your business, especially when so many options claim to help with things like efficiency and accuracy. My advice for finding the best solutions for you? Talk to your team to identify areas you want to improve and then check with your distributor to see if it has any technology solutions for your business. The more you can simplify the steps you need to go through to place orders and get materials, the easier (and more accurate and more efficient) your job will be.

    Brian Schaible relies on the ABC Connect program, which integrates with AccuLynx Quick Order and EagleView Construct, to streamline his business. To learn more about ABC Connect, read an “Online Exclusive” about it.

    RCASF More than Doubles Contribution to Make-a-Wish Foundation

    With the generous contributions of local roofing contractors and associate members, the Roofing Contractors Association of South Florida more than doubled its 2016 contribution to the Make-a-Wish Foundation compared to its 2015 donation.

    Through the 37th annual Fishing Tournament, RCASF members were able to raise enough money to make wishes come true for 15 children in south Florida who are struggling with illnesses.

    Through the 37th annual Fishing Tournament, RCASF members were able to raise enough money to make wishes come true for 15 children in south Florida who are struggling with illnesses.


    Through its 37th annual Fishing Tournament, RCASF members raised $75,000 to make wishes come true for 15 children in south Florida who are struggling with illnesses. Six Signature Sponsors gifted $5,000 each, or “one wish”. These gracious donors included Certified Contracting Group, CL Burks Construction, Earl W. Johnston Roofing, Empire Roofing, Spec Building Supply, and Weather-Tech Roofing & Waterproofing.

    Norm Wedderburn, CEO and president of the Make-A-Wish Foundation Southern Florida, says, “We cannot thank the RCASF enough! RCASF has helped us to change many lives and for that we will be eternally grateful.”

    Members of RCASF’s Fishing Tournament Committee donate $75,000 to Norm Wedderburn (far left), CEO and president, and Wanda Trouba (second from left), vice president, of the Make-a-Wish Foundation.

    Members of RCASF’s Fishing Tournament Committee donate $75,000 to Norm Wedderburn (far left), CEO and president, and Wanda Trouba (second from left), vice president, of the Make-a-Wish Foundation.


    The RCASF Fishing Committee has already begun planning for this year’s tournament, which will take place June 11. The committee hopes the 2017 tournament exceeds the 2016 contributions. Committee members encourage donations of fishing-related items for auction, as well as financial sponsorships. If you would like to contribute, contact Wendy Harvest, RCASF executive director, at (954)558-4982 or admin@rcasf.org.

    Photos: Roofing Contractors Association of South Florida

    Synthetic Underlayment Can Be Used on Nearly Any Roof

    Based on contractor demand, Berry Plastics Co., the makers of the TYPAR Weather Protection System, launched Surround VR Underlayment, a synthetic roofing underlayment.

    Based on contractor demand, the makers of the TYPAR Weather Protection System launched a synthetic underlayment named Surround VR.

    Based on contractor demand, Berry Plastics Co., the makers of the TYPAR Weather Protection System, launched Surround VR Underlayment, a synthetic roofing underlayment.

    Designed with the installer in mind, Surround VR Underlayment reduces the amount and weight of material needed for roofing jobs. In fact, one roll of Surround VR covers the same area as five rolls of 30# felt, yet weighs seven times less and is 10 times stronger.

    The waterproof product was developed to work in nearly any roofing application, including with shingles, shakes, tile, slate or metal roofs. “With our new Surround VR Underlayment, installers will make fewer and easier trips up and down the ladder while experiencing faster installs, all while providing a more durable roofing system to their customers,” says Jorge Martinez, senior director of Product Marketing, TYPAR brand.

    Made from a waterproof, synthetic polymer material, Surround VRUnderlayment is engineered to repel moisture and will not warp or buckle when wet, thus helping to maximize the life of the roof system. Surround VR is also slip-resistant on dry surfaces and provides better traction when wet.

    The underlayment maintains its integrity year-round, performing well in temperatures ranging from -40 to 240 F. In cold temperatures, the material will not crack or wrinkle, which helps ensure smooth installs. In warm temperatures, its heat-reflecting, gray-colored surface reduces heat buildup on the roof. Surround VR also can withstand up to six months’ exposure to UV light and high winds and storms, even those experienced by coastal regions.

    Surround VR Underlayment is backed by a 15-year product replacement warranty and is suited for residential and commercial applications.

    Learn More

    Visit Typar.com
    Call (800) 284-2780

    Technology Love-Hate

    My husband is addicted to social media. Bart’s not posting; he’s just a voyeur, constantly ob- serving what others are doing and talking about. I don’t think he feels like he’s missing out on
    anything. Instead, I think during quiet moments, Facebook and Snapchat help him fill the silence. Apparently, Bart is not the only one. We just celebrated the holidays with our families and, at one point on Christmas, I looked up and saw my father, my two brothers and my husband with their noses buried in their phones. Meanwhile, my two- and six-year-old nieces were squealing with glee over gifts they had opened. I couldn’t help but wonder whether the men in my family were enjoying their moment or someone else’s.

    I know my family isn’t the only group of individuals addicted to social media, so this issue is packed full of selfie-worthy venues. If you’ve ever wanted to visit Banff, Alberta, Canada, the Moose Hotel & Suites, our “Cover Story” is Banff’s latest destination hotel. It was designed so visitors wouldn’t feel like they’re in any hotel room anywhere. Ted Darch, owner of Calgary, Alberta-based E.J. Darch Architect Ltd., designed the hotel to resemble a village with a courtyard in the middle. Visitors can experience the drama of the mountains surrounding Banff from nearly any vantage point within the hotel. (They’re already posting about it on TripAdvisor!) And when guests are outside, the hotel itself is photo-worthy with its bright red concrete tile roof. “Other roofing options were nice but they didn’t have the snap that the red tile does,” Darch said when he explained his choice to me. There are many more captivating hospitality and entertainment projects with beautiful, innovative roofs throughout the issue.

    A colleague once told me he thought I was afraid of technology. Maybe that’s true when it comes to social media (I rarely personally Facebook or Tweet and all my Pinterest boards are “secret”), but I definitely embrace technology that makes life and work easier. In “On My Mind”, Brian Schaible, operations general manager at Indianapolis-based Hoosier Contractors LLC, explains new technology that provided a more efficient way for him to order materials for different jobs. His building materials supplier offered Schaible an online program that connects with the software he already was using. Learn about Schaible’s experience and then read our “Online Exclusive” that explains more about the program.

    In every issue of Roofing, we provide interactive content. On page 8, we show you how to download a free app that will bring our magazine to life. In this issue, open the app with your smartphone or tablet over page 16 and watch the Washington, D.C.- based Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association’s short video about roof algae. In our digital edition, the video will automatically play when you land on page 16. Our Roofing team is pretty proud of this capability. We’d love to hear what you think!

    Hazard Communication for Roofers

    To follow the OSHA Haz-Com standard, an employer must develop a written Hazard Communication plan.

    To follow the OSHA Haz-Com standard, an employer must develop a written Hazard Communication plan.

    According to Paracelsus, the 16th century physician and scientist: “Poison is in everything, and no thing is without poison. The dosage makes it either a poison or a remedy.”

    If you wash your windows in your house or car once in a while, the glass cleaner is not subject to the Washington, D.C.-based Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s Hazard Communication standard, which essentially ensures that information concerning the classified hazards of chemicals is transmitted. However, professional window washers use glass cleaners eight hours per day, five days a week, by the gallons and in stronger concentrations. For these people, OSHA’s Haz-Com standard comes into play and the window washer’s employer is expected to have a written Hazard Communication plan—a list of all hazardous chemicals onsite, Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) and the proper container labeling.

    In the roofing industry, synthetic roofing materials, asphalt roof shingles, adhesives and treated wood shingles all contain hazardous chemicals. In addition, items roofers use every day, like lubricants, hand-cleaning products, sealants, thinners, coatings, gasoline and diesel fuels, and even fire extinguishers, are subject to the HazCom standard.

    In OSHA’s Top 10 Most Frequently Cited Standards, Haz-Com is almost always No. 2, second only to Fall Protection. Out of 398 inspections in the construction/roofing industry in 2015, OSHA issued 768 citations and collected $443,317 in fines for HazCom. Unfortunately, this number is so high because many companies, who otherwise have an excellent safety record, do not understand or completely disregard the Haz-Com standard.

    If OSHA comes onto a company’s site to do an inspection for an accident, a complaint, or a visible infraction, an OSHA insprector may ask to see the Haz-Com plan and the SDSs. To follow the OSHA Haz-Com standard, an employer must develop a written Hazard Communication plan, determine what products onsite may be potentially hazardous, provide a list of all the hazardous or potentially hazardous substances onsite, and locate SDSs for all these products. These SDSs must be immediately available for all employees on the worksite during work hours.

    These chemicals must also be properly identified and labeled. Here’s what you need to know:

    Safety Data Sheets

    SDSs are information sheets for one specific product and have 16 standardized sections. The employer is responsible for having the SDSs onsite.

    Labeling

    Container labels must be clearly visible, legible and in English. If employees speak a language other than English, that language can be on the labels and SDSs, as well. There are six elements to Haz-Com labeling:

    • The product identifier appears at the top of a container. This is usually the name or code number to the product.
    • Pictograms are a black picture on a white diamond background with a red outline.
    • Pictograms are designed to be easily identifiable to non-native readers. They also make labels more identifiable.
    • The labeling format also includes one of two signal words: “Warning” or “Danger”.
    • Beneath the signal words, there are Hazard Statements and Precautionary statements. The Hazard Statement tells users how the chemical can be a hazard. The precautionary statement tells users how to protect themselves from the chemical.
    • Usually, on the bottom of a label, contact information for the manufacturer, importer and supplier is included.

    Training

    Training is also important to maintain the Haz-Com standard. Employees must be trained on the types of hazardous materials onsite, the location of the hazardous chemicals onsite, the locations of the Haz-Com plan and the locations of SDSs onsite. Employees must also be trained how to read the labels and SDSs.

    Learn More

    To learn more about Haz-Com and the toxic substances in roofing, visit the following websites:

    Photo: OSHA