ARMA, ERA and PIMA Research Advanced Roof Systems in Northern Climates

A coalition of trade groups is funding a research project about advanced roofing systems that were installed on an upstate New York correctional facility to evaluate the benefits of thermal insulation and cool roofing in Northern climates.

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA), Washington, D.C.; EPDM Roofing Association (ERA), Washington; and the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA), Bethesda, Md., are sponsoring continued analysis of a reroofing project at the Onondaga County Correctional Facility, Jamesville, N.Y. The Onondaga County Department of Facilities Management identified a need to study building energy use and stormwater runoff from roof systems. Temperature and rain data from the project, which includes vegetative roofing, increased insulation levels and “cool” roofs, will provide information about building performance and roof covering selection.

“ARMA members promote a balanced approach to roofing performance, especially when it comes to saving building energy,” says Reed Hitchcock, ARMA’s executive vice president. “Using a whole-building approach, where roofing reflectivity, insulation levels and other design elements are considered in the decision-making process, will help ensure the right system is selected; this project can only help with that decision.”

When the correctional facility was due for a major reroofing project in 2009, Onondaga County saw a unique opportunity to evaluate the water-retention and energy-efficiency performance for a variety of different roof covering assemblies. The project also offered valuable information that could be used to identify the best options for future reroof projects across the county’s entire building inventory.

The county worked with Ashley-McGraw Architects, Syracuse, N.Y., and CDH Energy, Cazenovia, N.Y., to design and install a field monitoring system to collect data on thermal performance, weather conditions and roof runoff from four buildings at the Jamesville facility. CDH Energy released a report in October 2011 that made recommendations on roof covering selection.

Hugh Henderson, P.E., CDH Energy, remarked the original report laid the groundwork for future roofing projects in Onondaga County. “The use of vegetative roof systems as a stormwater control mechanism was the most important takeaway from the first years of the project,” he explains. “Continuing the project will provide a better evaluation of cool roof and insulation products as part of roof designs in colder climates.”

With the instrumentation still in place, it was a simple decision to continue evaluating the roof coverings over a longer time period to better see how roof coverings interact with weather conditions. Of particular interest is the effect of accumulated snow on roofs that may affect the buildings’ thermal performance.

“Roof insulation is an integral part of the design strategy for a building’s energy-efficiency footprint, and this study will help building owners, contractors and architects assess a roof’s performance from a broader basis and ensure the best energy efficient components are used,” adds Jared Blum, PIMA president.

The Onondaga County reroofing project includes an analysis of the comparison of cool roof technologies, consisting of reflective roof surfaces and high-performing well-insulated roof covering assemblies. “Our members produce reflective and absorptive roof coverings; this study will provide meaningful data that can help designers select the right products for their particular project, regardless of where in the country the roof will be installed,” notes Ellen Thorp, ERA’s associate executive director.

The project is expected to run through 2015.

Asphalt Roofing Products Provide a Historic Mansion with Modern Performance Without Sacrificing its Classic Curb Appeal

Historic renovations can pose many challenges to roofing contractors. But when done correctly, a renovation on a classic home maintains the structure’s unique style, provides modern performance and even helps to preserve the rich history of an area. This kind of challenge was presented to Highland, Md.-based Certified Inc. when the roofing company was called upon to install a new roof on a historic mansion in Laurel, Md. By choosing the right roofing materials and utilizing proper techniques, the contractor was able to successfully preserve the home’s Victorian appearance and character using today’s safer, more affordable and reliable products, while also meeting the requirements of the local Historic District Commission.

Formerly known as the Phelps mansion, this Victorian-style house was built in 1888.

Formerly known as the Phelps mansion, this Victorian-style house was built in 1888.

A STORIED PAST

Formerly known as the Phelps mansion, this Victorian-style house was built in 1888. The mansion was the home of Edward Phelps, who served as the first mayor of Laurel. Throughout his seven terms in office, Phelps modernized the rural community by overseeing the addition of electric street lights; brick-paved roads; a telephone system; and a railroad that connected Laurel to Washington, D.C.

Jim Lessig, Certified’s project manager, was immediately drawn to the project when it was referred to him by a previous customer. “I was very interested in the project due to the historic nature and elaborate architecture of the home,” he says. “It wasn’t the largest project of the year for us, but definitely the most interesting and intricate.”

The Phelps mansion is located in the Historic District of Laurel, an area that is part of the original town. In the 1970s, a Historic District Commission was established to ensure the preservation of homes and businesses and keep the area’s small-town charm. When it came time to install a new roof on the mansion in June 2013, the homeowners worked with the commission to receive approval on building materials and roofing techniques based on a set of guidelines drafted by the organization.

Sunny Pritchard, coordinator for the Historic District Commission, describes the mansion as a magnificent old home that “sits on a sweeping piece of land and looks grand and proud with its high roof lines, gables and big open porches.” To Pritchard and the rest of the commission, it was imperative that the roof retained the home’s noble, Victorian look.

AN INTRICATE ROOF

Certified was faced with a historic challenge: How could it imitate the look of the home’s original slate roof while providing the safety and durability of today’s products? The answer came in the form of asphalt shingles, which were selected for the renovation and were approved by the historic commission.

The roofing contractor chose asphalt shingles because they were able to mimic the historic look of the original slate tiles while providing modern performance and reliability.

The roofing contractor chose asphalt shingles because they were able to mimic the historic look of the original slate tiles while providing modern performance and reliability.

“We chose to use asphalt shingles because they were able to mimic the historic look of the original slate tiles while providing modern performance and reliability,” Lessig notes. “The commission approved the shingle because in their view it gave an authentic slate look that maintained the house’s turnof- the century appearance.”

The chosen shingles are individually colored using precision color technology which allows a roof to maintain the color, contrast and authentic look of natural slate. Natural slate is expensive and takes a specialized labor force to install because the process is an art form. Natural slate can also be a heavy product and breakage can occur when you install it. Asphalt shingles provided a great value for the project, while mimicking the look and tone of slate from the curb.

Contractors used a combination of low- and steep-slope materials on the roof, and added built-in copper gutters to really make it stand out. The end result was a roof that is beautiful and durable. The home retains its ability to transport passersby back into a time of horse-drawn carriages, top hats and hoop skirts.

A CELEBRATED PRESENT

Since the installation, the Phelps mansion’s new roof has gained national attention. In February, the historic home received one of the asphalt roofing industry’s top honors—the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study Awards (QARC) Bronze Award. The annual QARC awards program is run by the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA), Washington, D.C., and recognizes roofing projects that demonstrate the beauty, durability, reliability and affordability of asphalt-based roofing products.

the historic home received one of the asphalt roofing industry’s top honors—the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study Awards (QARC) Bronze Award.

The historic home received one of the asphalt roofing industry’s top honors—the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study Awards (QARC) Bronze Award.

The Bronze Award recognized the contractor’s choice of an asphalt roofing product that was easy to work with and provided a safe working environment while successfully replicating the 19th century look and feel of the home.

Because of Certified’s excellent work and the unique products used for the project, this historic mansion will continue to represent the image of the original Laurel district and help preserve the area’s history for many more years to come.

“I would have loved to be one of the preserved boards in this house so I could have recorded the happenings throughout the years,” Pritchard notes. “That is what old homes have, a history of happenings, and if you let the roofs and boards decay and rot and eventually fall down, all of that history goes with it. We want to preserve both—the boards and the history.”

ROOF MATERIALS
Highland Slate shingles: CertainTeed Corp.

Learn More about Asphalt Shingles
To learn about the color process and how asphalt shingles are made, check out this video from the Washington, D.C.-based Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association.

Learn about ARMA and the QARC awards program.

PHOTOS: EMERY PHOTOGRAPHY

ARMA and ASTM to Develop Product Category Rules for Asphalt Roofing in North America

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has partnered with ASTM International to develop Product Category Rules (PCR) for asphalt roofing in North America. The new PCR will provide consistent methodologies for asphalt roofing manufacturers to measure and report the expected environmental impact of their products. This new document can be accessed for free on ASTM International’s website (www.astm.org/certification).

PCRs provide guidelines for the development of Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for a specific product group. PCRs are valuable to any industry because they streamline the process through which products are measured and their environmental impacts communicated, creating globally consistent documentation. Asphalt roofing manufacturers can use these guidelines to review their own products and develop an EPD, which is a verified document that reports the expected environmental performance of a product based on its expected life cycle. An EPD uses the data collected through PCR guidelines to provide comparable environmental impact data for similar products.

“This PCR is a significant, universal resource for the asphalt roofing industry,” said ARMA executive vice president Reed Hitchcock. “It provides asphalt roofing manufacturers with a way to collect, measure, and communicate data pertaining to expected product environmental impacts through an Environmental Product Declaration, and will give consumers and industry professionals new insight into asphalt roofing materials. Developing these guidelines helps further ARMA’s commitment to transparency and environmental sustainability.”

ARMA and several of its member companies participated in the development of this PCR, titled “Asphalt Shingles, Built-Up Asphalt Membrane Roofing, and Modified Bituminous Membrane Roofing.” The guidelines cover asphalt shingles applied over underlayment, and low-slope roofing assemblies consisting of various combinations of factory-produced asphalt-saturated or coated base sheets, ply sheets and cap sheets together with specified viscous asphalt coatings, adhesives and surfacings.

ASTM began its PCR and EPD program in 2012 to provide an infrastructure that can be used for the evaluation and communication of a product’s full-lifecycle environmental impacts. ASTM develops PCRs in partnership with various segments of the building construction industry and in accordance with international standards. ARMA’s partnership with ASTM was an efficient way to provide a PCR to asphalt roofing manufacturers that is standard among researchers, developers, consumers and businesses.

ARMA Seeks Projects that Demonstrate Beauty, Affordability and Reliability of Asphalt Roofing

Does your asphalt roofing project have what it takes to win one of the top awards in the industry? The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) is again looking for the top commercial and residential asphalt roofing projects for its 2015 Quality Asphalt Roofing Case Study (QARC) Awards Program.

QARC is open to roofing contractors, consultants and architects working with asphalt roofing products. The awards program will honor the top three projects that demonstrate the beauty, affordability and reliability of asphalt roofing.

The submission period for the QARC Awards Program is coming to an end. Roofing professionals have until Wednesday, Dec. 31 to submit their best asphalt roofing projects. ARMA wants to see your most outstanding work from 2014, so submit your entry today before time runs out!

Submitting a project is easy. Industry professionals can enter their project online on the QARC Awards page of ARMA’s website by providing a description of the project and explaining why and how asphalt products were used. Entrants are also required to upload a few hi-resolution photos of the completed project. Both new construction and renovation projects are eligible for the program.

“The QARC Awards Program highlights top industry professionals and their work with asphaltic roofing products,” said Reed Hitchcock, executive vice president of ARMA. “Previous winners have been chosen for their innovative design, sustainable building methods and successful renovation techniques. We aim to document outstanding projects that demonstrate the benefits of asphalt roofing systems and help home and building owners find the best value in roofing.”

There is no limit to the number of entries a contestant can submit, and there is no fee to enter. ARMA awards cash prizes to the top three roofing projects, and the winners are featured in national roofing trade publications.

Roofing Manufacturers and Contractors Embrace Recycling

In the early 2000s, as the green-building movement reached its tipping point, the roofing industry’s contributions to sustainability focused on increasing energy efficiency, improving long-term durability and addressing the heat-island effect. In the years since, significant strides have been made in all three of these areas for commercial and residential buildings.

In recent years, increasing attention has been given to the benefits and challenges of recycling roofing materials at the end of their useful life. This is no trivial task: Owens Corning estimates asphalt shingles alone comprise up to 5 percent of building-related landfill waste. This doesn’t take into account other roofing materials, including EPDM, thermoplastic PVC and metal.

Not surprisingly, rising removal costs, coupled with the growing demand in some areas of the country to legislate landfill content, are putting pressure on contractors and building owners to seek alternatives to traditional roof construction scrap and tear-off disposal methods.

In response, greater numbers of roofing manufacturers and contractors are driving strategies to avoid the landfill. A general review of emerging trends across the roofing industry suggests manufacturers and contractors increasingly are turning to recycling to steer these materials from the waste stream.

Steel is the most recycled material in building construction today. PHOTO: STEEL RECYCLING INSTITUTE

Steel is the most recycled material in building construction today. PHOTO: STEEL RECYCLING INSTITUTE

METAL

Metal roofing’s sustainable attributes are significant. Industry experts cite its ability to improve a building’s energy efficiency, and metal today contains anywhere from 25 to 95 percent recycled material.

On its website, the Chicago-based Metal Construction Association (MCA) encourages installing metal roofing directly over an existing roof, thus eliminating the need to dispose of the original materials. But when an older metal roof or new-construction debris must be removed from a site, contractors and owners in most regions of the country can quickly identify scrap yards that take metal.

“Steel is the most recycled material in building construction today,” says MCA Technical Director Scott Kriner. “There’s an infrastructure that supports it, and metal in general is virtually 100 percent recyclable.” Kriner notes MCA supports recycling as part of the metal industry’s overall commitment to environmental sustainability and transparency in business.

PVC

PVC has been used in roofing systems since the 1960s, and the post-consumer recycling of roof membranes began in North America in 1999—a nice symmetry when one considers roofs in terms of 30-year life cycles.

In general terms, the recycling of PVC roofing is a relatively straightforward process. The material is sliced into long strips, rolled up, lifted off the roof and transported to a recycling center. Recyclers run the PVC through a conveyor system, where fasteners and other metal objects are removed.

Initially, the recovered membrane was ground into powder for reuse in molded roof walkway pads. More recently, some manufacturers have been incorporating a granulated form into new PVC roofing membranes, exclusively on the backside to avoid aesthetic issues with color variations. The first installations of membrane produced with post-consumer recycled composition occurred in the mid-1990s. So far, its field performance has matched that of PVC roofing produced with virgin raw materials.

The Vinyl Institute, Alexandria, Va., says close to 1 billion pounds of vinyl are recycled at the postindustrial level yearly. “The vinyl industry has a history of supporting recycling,” the institute reports on its website, “and this effort continues as companies, alone and through their trade associations, expand existing programs and explore new opportunities to recover vinyl products at the end of their useful life.”

EPDM

Ethylene propylene diene terpolymer is used extensively on low-slope commercial buildings. Yet even this durable synthetic rubber membrane must eventually be replaced, and today recycling is a viable option.

The removal process generally involves power-vacuuming off the stone ballast, where present, to expose the EPDM membrane below. The membrane can then be cut into manageable squares, which are folded and stacked on pallets, loaded onto a truck and transported for recycling. The recycler grinds it into crumbs or powder, depending on the end use. A growing number of recycling centers nationwide now handles EPDM.

Pages: 1 2

ARMA’s Website Now Is More Interactive

With technology changing the way the roofing industry communicates, the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has made its website more interactive in an effort to keep users better connected in today’s fast-paced world.

The website’s new capabilities will mean convenient access to information for roofing professionals working on job sites and more content on asphalt shingles in the hands of consumers where they are increasingly demanding it—on their smartphones and tablets.

“ARMA makes available industry-leading roofing information to the public through our website,” says Reed Hitchcock, executive vice-president, ARMA. “Now that the site features mobile responsive functionality, roofing professionals and consumers alike will be able to easily access the same resources from their phone or tablet as they do from their desktop or laptop.”

All of the features available on the ARMA website are now optimized for viewing on Apple or Android mobile and tablet devices. ARMA’s popular resources, including Technical Bulletins, Fast Facts, commercial and residential photo galleries, FAQs and videos, have been formatted to fit on the screen of the device with which they are being viewed.

“Whether you are a roofing contractor who’s looking for shingle installation tips while working on a home or a homeowner who wants to see different design options while shopping at the store, visitors to the site will benefit greatly from the more easily accessed information that ARMA’s upgraded website will offer,” adds Hitchcock.

ARMA redesigned its website a year ago to provide visitors with both enhanced user-friendly features which improved navigation and online shopping for roofing publications. ARMA offers a wide variety of general, educational and specialized design and installation guides for both residential and commercial asphalt roofing systems.

Seal of Approval: How to Make the Most of Asphalt-shingle Sealants

Extreme weather events, such as the wide temperature swings during the recent winter and hurricanes that afflict coastal regions, have increased consumer demand for reliable and high-performance roofs. Asphalt-shingle roofs have been proven to provide the protection homeowners need, thanks to the material’s durability and longevity.

Many asphalt shingles rely on built-in sealants to provide a solid installation. This sealant material is an asphalt-based, heat-activated, viscous bonding material, which retains adhesion in difficult weather conditions, after the initial bonding of the shingles has occurred. The sealant will fuse the asphalt shingles together when each course is properly attached to the roof deck and previous courses.

IMAGE: Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association

Click to view a larger version of this image. IMAGE: Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association

The bonding sealant is factory-applied on the front or back side of the shingle, depending on the manufacturer’s design. Heat from the sun activates and softens the sealant, initiating the bonding process. After the bonding of the shingle sealant, the shingles provide a home with superior wind-resistance.

If not installed correctly, the sealant will not be able to do its job, which could result in shingle blow-offs and other performance issues. For the roofer, shingles that are not properly installed and allowed to bond could mean an unwanted call back to the job site. The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) recommends contractors follow these essential steps to ensure asphalt shingles are installed properly the first time and that sealant adhesion is not impeded:

Scheduling: If an asphalt-shingle installation takes place in cold or windy weather, it could impact the ability of the sealant to cure. The sealant cannot bond in cold weather, and the wind could shift the shingles and break the bond before it has a chance to complete the process. Follow manufacturer instructions for cold-weather installation or plan for projects when weather conditions are more suitable.

Roof Deck: Making sure the substrate and roof deck are not damaged or deteriorated is key to maximizing the potential of the asphalt-shingle sealant. If these elements are overlooked, the shingles will not have a solid base for fastener attachment, and the sealant between the shingles could be less effective.

Underlayment: Proper installation of an approved underlayment will provide the appropriate surface for shingle installation and will help manage water. Ice-barrier underlayment materials, compliant with ASTM D 1970, are recommended for use in northern climates where accumulation of snow or ice on the roof is likely. The ice shield provides extra protection from the potential for water damage; this is especially important on reroofs of older homes where the placement or quantity of attic insulation allows heat to flow to the roof.

Accessories: Roofing accessories, such as flashings at penetrations, valleys and changes in direction of the roof, are essential to making sure the sealant can do its job. Roofers should select approved accessories, whether they are drip edges, ridge vents or other architectural details.

Nailing: The actual attachment of the asphalt shingles is where a roofer has the most control over the installation process. It is important to make sure shingles are attached to the deck with the proper type, size and quantity of nails, as well as in the precise location required. Make sure the nails are in the right place by driving them in the indicated “nailing zone.” Always ensure nails used in laminated shingles are driven through the double-thickness overlap area.

Selecting a shingle that meets or exceeds wind-speed requirements in local building codes will help a roof covering withstand windstorms and protect a home. Further, roofers should always follow all building codes and manufacturer installation requirements for shingle applications.

Asphalt shingles are manufactured to provide homeowners with beautiful, affordable and reliable protection for their homes. It is up to the installer to ensure the sealants can do their job by making sure other facets of the proper installation process are followed.

GAF Roofs Recognized in ARMA’s 2014 Quality Asphalt Roofing Case Study Program

Three GAF roofs were recognized in ARMA’s (the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association’s) 2014 Quality Asphalt Roofing Case Study (QARC) program. The QARC program seeks to recognize industry professionals who use asphaltic roofing and to document successful projects that illustrate the benefits of asphalt roofing systems.

Winning the Gold award was Doral City Hall, submitted by Precision Roofing Corp. of Miami. The built-up roofing project tasked the contractor with performing a complex roofing job under tight government scrutiny while protecting the building’s assets, reducing costs, and assuring roof longevity. In addition, Precision Roofing was mandated to install an energy-efficient roof system using a cap sheet that exceeds the reflectance requirements of ENERGY STAR, Title 24 and the Miami 21 Initiative. The project featured multiple roof areas, including a portion over lightweight insulating concrete using the GAFGLAS Stratavent Eliminator Nailable Venting Base Sheet, three plies of premium glass ply, and the hot-mopped EnergyCap BUR cap sheet. This premium roof system features high reflectivity, meets the latest building code standards, and offers reliable and redundant protection for this important government facility.

This year’s Silver award-winning project was completed by Advanced Roofing Inc. of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., on a high-profile Publix grocery store. As a Publix Corporate preferred roofing contractor, Advanced Roofing was chosen from more than 200 other bidders for this new construction roofing project. The 60,000-square-foot roof consists of three plies of Type 6 hot-mopped roofing felt followed by one ply of Ruberoid PRF modified bitumen fire-rated cap sheet, and then coated with a white/gray striped design. The coating added reflective performance and an aesthetic design, offering Publix the extra protection of a four-ply asphalt roofing system that features both durability and sustainability. In fact, Publix Corporate uses asphalt-based roofing for 90 percent of its properties, and this roof was the 70th new roof installed by Advanced Roofing Inc. for the grocery store chain since 1996.

Achieving Honorable Mention in the 2014 ARMA QARC contest was The Luzerne County Courthouse in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., submitted by Mark J. Sobeck Roof Consulting Inc. The decision to go with GAF’s Monaco roofing shingles in Venetian Coral was based on the County’s desire to re-create the look of the original building’s European clay tile while saving up to 70 percent of the cost of the original roof. The asphalt roofing shingles were also chosen for their durability, impact resistance, and ability to hold up to roof traffic compared with the original barrel-shaped Spanish tile. Not only has this roof become the talk of the town of Wilkes-Barre, it also met the four key criteria specified by the County and the roof consultant: durability, aesthetics, reliability, and cost.

“These three award-winning projects are great examples of how asphalt-based roofing can do it all—on low- and steep-slope roofs for a variety of clients,” says Lynn Picone, director of inside sales at GAF. “The roofing industry is indebted to ARMA and its leadership for following through on yet another successful QARC program. This case study program provides all industry professionals the opportunity to share good roofing practices and have their efforts recognized by ARMA’s panel of judges.”

Asphalt Roofing Projects Awarded for Sustainable Use and Beautiful Design

What do one of the largest independent supermarket chains, a local government city hall and historic mansion all have in common? An understanding and appreciation of the value provided by asphaltic roofing. From shingles to BUR to modified bitumen, these systems provided beautiful, affordable and reliable performance to the winners of the 2014 Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study Awards (QARC) program.

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) bestowed the Gold Award to Precision Roofing Corp. for Doral City Hall, located in a city that was incorporated just a decade ago; the Silver Award to Advanced Roofing Inc. for a newly constructed Publix supermarket in Miami; and the Bronze Award to Certified Inc. for the Phelps Mansion, which was built in 1888 and was home to Mayor Edward Phelps, best known for bringing electric street lights, a telephone system and a Washington, D.C., railroad connection to his hometown of Laurel, Md. In addition to the three QARC winners, a series of projects were also recognized with honorable mentions.

For each of the winning projects, the asphalt roofing system played an important role; whether it was to add multiply redundancy to ensure the safety of employees and shoppers alike, meet requirements set by a historic commission that requested a product that imitated slate, or to surpass energy-efficiency standards established by the local building code.

“Asphalt roofing’s beauty and reliability contributed to making each of these distinct projects a success,” says Reed Hitchcock, executive vice-president for ARMA. “Property owners look to asphalt roofing for aesthetic designs and durable, long-lasting protection. Asphalt roofing provides the adaptability they need, evident by its use in the QARC award-winning projects.”

The annual QARC Awards program honors the architects, contractors and specifiers who use asphaltic roofing materials on low-slope and steep-slope building projects. Each year, the program reveals the most exceptional residential and commercial roofing projects from across North America. The 2014 award recipients are:

    Gold
    Project Name: Doral City Hall
    Doral, Fla.
    Company: Precision Roofing Corp.
    Project description: The roofing system consisted of multiple roof areas, including three plies of premium glass ply and an energy-efficient cap sheet that exceeded the reflectance requirements of ENERGY STAR®, Title 24 and the Miami 21 Initiative.

    Silver
    Project Name: Publix
    Miami
    Company: Advanced Roofing Inc.
    Project description: Due to the high-rise buildings adjacent to the new store, Publix’s specification required the roofing contractor top-coat the roof with a white and gray striped design consisting of a 2.5-inch Polyiso, a Stratavent Eliminator Base Sheet, three plies of Type IV and a 190 FR Modified Bitumen Cap Sheet.

    Bronze
    Project Name: Everett Victorian
    Laurel, Md.
    Company: Certified Inc.
    Project description: The asphalt roofing shingle on this home was chosen because it imitated natural slate, one of the products that had been approved by the local historic commission. The product was also easy to work with, providing a safe environment for the contractors onsite.

    Honorable Mentions
    Watts
    Mill Creek, Wash.
    Chris Howard Roofing LLC

    Dufrene Ranch
    Sloughhouse, Calif.
    Lucero’s Roofing

    Waid
    Marietta, Ga.
    Atlanta Re-Roof Specialists Inc.

    Luzerne County Courthouse
    Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
    Mark J. Sobeck Roof Consulting Inc.

The 2014 QARC judges represented experts in the roofing and home design industry, as well as the building and construction trade media. For the low-slope commercial systems, the judging criteria focused on the project’s unique aesthetics, performance and adaptability; while the steep-slope residential projects were evaluated based on the different asphalt shingle textures, styles and colors which can transform a home.

One of the judges stated that the gold winner best exemplified “how asphalt-based roofing products meet the key needs of commercial buildings – energy-efficiency, reliability and affordability—in ways that other roofing products are simply unable to.”

Another judge stated about the silver winner: “Miami presents roofing challenges with wind, hot temperatures, humidity and hurricanes. I was impressed with the use of four plies and Publix’s commitment to excellence. The cool roof is an added bonus which will save the owner in energy costs.”

The top three winners will receive a check from ARMA in the amounts of $2,000, $1,000 and $500, and will have their roofing projects featured on the ARMA website.

ARMA is now accepting submissions for the 2015 QARC awards campaign. For more information about the QARC Awards or to submit a project, please visit the association’s website.

ARMA Releases Educational Video

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association has produced a short, educational video, titled “Asphalt Roofing and the Science of Color”. It explains how manufacturers create different color shades and combinations. The video is designed to help homeowners choose the color that works best for their home. Watch the video on the association website or YouTube channel.