Metal Tiles Help Modernize Texas Bank’s Building and Brand

The design for the bank’s exterior incorporates metal tiles from Petersen to clad the building’s two entrances. A standing seam metal roof wraps around the building, intersecting with the metal tile. Photo: Tom Coplen, buenavistaphotography.com

When Southside Bank in Texas began a campaign to modernize its brand, management understood that the buildings it occupies play a significant role in branding. The existing flagship branch in Tyler, Texas, was re-imagined and renovated inside and out to reflect the contemporary way the bank now interacts with its customers.

Architect Chad Humphries AIA, RID, project architect and partner, Fitzpatrick Architects in Tyler, Texas, extracted the vision for the renovation from the Southside team and created the bank’s signature design element using metal tiles from Petersen to clad the building’s two entrances. A standing seam metal roof wrapped around the building, and intersected with the metal tile at the entrances.

Humphries specified 10,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roof panels in 22-gauge steel finished in PAC-CLAD Slate Gray color. Also specified was 2,000 square feet of Petersen’s Precision Series TS Tile in .023 aluminum finished in anodized dark bronze. Additionally, 500 square feet of Petersen’s composite rain screen in Classic Bronze finish was installed.

The building was topped with 10,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roof panels in 22-gauge steel. Photo: Tom Coplen, buenavistaphotography.com

“The tiles were the main design element we wanted on the entryways, to function as both wall and roof material, to blur the line between roof and wall,” Humphries says. “Metal tiles have been around in Europe for centuries, and we employed the PAC-CLAD Precision Series TS Tile as a modern option. Metal has a timelessness that is appealing, and in this project it achieved the aesthetic vision and performance needs we established.”

The tile concept on the entryways was such a success on this project that it will be duplicated on many other Southside Bank buildings. Humphries likes the metal tile’s low profile and the way it also adds texture to the wall. “I especially like the way the light interacts on the tile’s surface, which allows for a wall that changes its appearance as the sun progresses across the sky throughout the day,” he says.

When selecting products for any project, Humphries values how long a product has been on the market. “Even though the Precision Series TS Tile hasn’t been around a long time, it was Petersen’s version of a product with proven history and that was good enough for us,” he notes.

Design Challenges

Where the tile on the entryways met the standing seam roof, a junction not often encountered was created. The tile-to-panel junction was easy to deal with because ultimately it was a simple metal-to-metal joint, according to Humphries. “Additionally, the tile allowed for a 45-degree turn without requiring edge band,” he says.

A metal roof was chosen because of metal’s longevity, and the need to blend in to the building’s design, notes Humphries, who typically specifies some kind of metal element on every project. Design challenges included peeling back and sorting through the multiple phases of additions and renovations inside and outside of the building, ultimately to be truer to the original design of the building. “For example, in the 1970s they added a concrete superstructure. But in the 90s, rather than removing it, they built a giant green mansard roof over it. Over time the building’s design became a mixture of ideas with no clear vision in mind. Our job was to simplify and unify everything,” he explains.

Approximately 2,000 square feet of Petersen’s Precision Series TS Tile in .023 aluminum finished in anodized dark bronze were installed. Photo: Tom Coplen, buenavistaphotography.com

This project was the first one for installing contractor Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal in Longview, Texas, on which metal tile was involved, says Anthony McKinley, vice president, estimator and project manager. “The tiles tied into a valley with the existing roof, so we made sure they were cut properly and flanged,” he says. “Installation of the tile and standing seam roof was straightforward for our experienced crew. It was a slower process working with the tiles because we wanted to make sure the lines were straight, level and square. The details were custom so we took a little longer to make sure we measured correctly and got it looking right.”

All metal work on the building was performed by McKinley’s team. “This job was large in scope mainly because of the removal and replacement of the mansard roofing,” McKinley says. “After taking off the roof panels, we removed fake dormers to create a straight, plain look. We tore everything down to the wood deck. Ultimately, we were at least six months on the jobsite. Most of our time was spent removing the existing metal, which required a man lift, which is a slow process.”

“We felt it was important to make sure the owner and architect liked what we were doing by not making design decisions on our own,” McKinley says. “Some jobs you know what to do, but on this one we wanted to make sure the architect liked it. We figured out details to make it work for integrity and water intrusion, but also to give the architect the look he wanted. We figured out the details on our own because those typically aren’t specified.” Edge metal was fabricated by McKinley’s crew. “We love working with PAC-CLAD,” McKinley says. “They have superior products, and the technical help Petersen provides is very valuable.”

TEAM

Architect: Fitzpatrick Architects in Tyler, Texas, https://fitzpatrickarchitects.com

Roofing Contractor: Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal, Longview, Texas, www.curtismckinleyroofing.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: Snap-Clad 22-gauge steel finished in PAC-CLAD Slate Gray color, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Metal Tiles: Precision Series TS Tile, .023 aluminum finished in anodized dark bronze, Petersen

Colorful Exterior for Veterinary Hospital Comes Together Without a Hitch

The Kimbrough Animal Hospital in Longview, Texas, features a colorful exterior constructed of metal roof and wall panels. Photos: Petersen

Kimbrough Animal Hospital in Longview, Texas, is designed to provide top-notch care for its furry patients. The building includes surgical suites, treatment areas, and an in-house lab, as well as boarding and grooming facilities.

The state-of-the-art facility is housed in a striking complex highlighted by colorful metal roof and wall panels. It was a complicated new construction project on a tight jobsite, but experience and planning made for a smooth, textbook execution.

Complicated projects are nothing new for Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal. Headquartered in Longview, Texas, the company has been in business for 33 years and does a variety of commercial, industrial and residential work, including modified bitumen, built-up, single-ply and shingle roofs, as well as metal roofing and sheet metal fabrication. “We did all the metal on the project,” says Anthony McKinley, vice president of Curtis-McKinley. “We did the roof, the walls and soffit.”

McKinley was confident his crews could execute the project smoothly, and his confidence was bolstered by his experience working on other projects with the general contractor, Transet Company, and the manufacturer of the roof and wall panels, Petersen.

“We have a good relationship with Transet Company and we’ve done so much work with Petersen that they know our company and our guys,” McKinley says. “If there are any technical questions, they are very quick to help and get us answers, and inspections go great.”

The Roof and Walls

The roof and wall panels were manufactured from 24-gauge steel. The roof was covered with approximately 18,000 square feet of 18-inch PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels in Charcoal. The exterior also incorporates 4,400 square feet of 16-inch HWP panels in Slate Gray and 5,250 square feet of 12-inch Flush Panels in three colors: Slate Gray, Teal and Berkshire Blue.

The roof is comprised of Petersen’s 18-inch PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels in Charcoal. Photos: Petersen

Crews from Curtis-McKinley dried the roof in with TAMKO’s TW Metal and Tile self-adhered underlayment and tackled different phases of the project as the building came together. “We kind of did it all at one time,” McKinley recalls. “First, we had a roofing crew come out and put the peel-and-stick on the roof, and we measured for the roof panels. Then we started installing all of the trim and had a few guys start installing the wall panels.”

Petersen fabricated and delivered the wall panels, which were installed over plywood and cinder block walls using a man lift. On the cinder block walls, hat channels were installed to receive the clips. At two entrances, the Flush Panels were installed vertically. “We also installed regular flush soffit panels,” notes McKinley.

A representative from Petersen roll-formed the roof panels on the site. Some of the panels were more than 50 feet long, and this posed some logistical problems. “It was a very tight construction site,” McKinley explains. “We ran the panels on site and we had to lift them up with a crane. We couldn’t use a lift because there was no way to turn the lift around when the panels were loaded. There was one long driveway down one side, and we had to stack all of the panels in one direction and lift them straight up.”

Panels were lifted using a spreader bar as a cradle. “We strapped the panels to the spreader bar,” McKinley notes. “We only lifted about 10 panels at a time and our guys would receive them and stack them at points along the roof. We had about six or seven guys on the roof and the rest of the crew on the ground to strap down the panels.”

The walls feature Petersen’s 24-gauge HWP and Flush Panels in multiple colors, including Slate Gray, Teal and Berkshire Blue. Photos: Petersen

The crew started installing panels on the main roof and finished roof sections alongside the structure as the job progressed. Crew members were tied off 100 percent of the time, using temporary anchor points screwed into in the deck. “We started off on the main roof area and worked our way from the back to the front,” McKinley recalls. “The shed roofs were incorporated as we worked our way forward.”

While the main crew worked on the roof, a smaller group sometimes split off to install the wall panels. “We had a crew with a few extra sheet metal guys on it, and we moved them around as needed,” McKinley notes. “That way they could start on the walls as the roof progressed and the job wouldn’t lag on.”

Planning Ahead

The main challenge on the project was the tight jobsite, according to McKinley. “It was a very limited site,” McKinley says. “Once we got the roof panels on, we could breathe a little easier.”

Despite the cramped conditions, communication between the crews kept conflicts to a minimum. “Working with other trades went fine,” McKinley says. “The superintendent on the site was easy to work with. We worked with other subcontractors in Longview we’ve worked with plenty of times. Our guys knew their guys, basically, and they just coordinate well and work around each other as needed.”

The project moved along smoothly and stayed on schedule. “We were blessed not to have any big weather delays,” McKinley says. “When they were ready for us, we were able to get right out there and move things along in a timely manner.”

McKinley also credits the manufacturer for help executing the project. “There are four or five different colors on it,” he says. “Each entrance was a different color, and the walls and roof. That was pretty interesting. Keeping it all straight with the guys was a challenge.”

Again, planning ahead was essential. “It just took a little more communication,” McKinley says. “When we were making our trim, we just had to make sure it was the right color. It’s very easy to work with Petersen. On a job like this one, the technical aspect of it was really very simple, but seeing all of the different colors on this project come together was pretty cool.”

Curtis-McKinley crew members were able to execute all of the transition details themselves as they installed the roof and wall panels. “They were all standard details, really,” McKinley says. “Almost all of the transitions were something the guys have done hundreds of times.”

Exceptions included the large, irregularly shaped windows at the entryways, which were trimmed in red. “There were two entrances with windows that were a little different,” McKinley says. “One set had a sort of triangular shape, which was pretty straightforward to flash. The other had a circular window, and that took a lot of time and coordination with the window people to ensure that we got it watertight with the flashing. Getting the trim for that wall custom made and fitting perfectly was a bit of a challenge.”

Taking a complicated project and making it look easy is one of the strengths of Curtis-McKinley Roofing. “The key is having the right guys,” McKinley says. “We are blessed to have very experienced professional roofers and sheet metal installers. Our sheet metal guys have done this for years. That’s getting harder to find these days, and we still have some older guys that know how to do it. They’ve done so much of it that I often rely on them to tell me, ‘This is how it needs to be done,’ or ‘This is a better way to do it.’ Then we just make sure everything conforms to the plans and specifications, and we ensure the installation integrity. Obviously the most important thing is to keep the water out.”

TEAM

Architect: Ron Mabry Architects, Tyler, Texas, www.ronmabryarchitects.com

General Contractor: Transet Co., Longview, Texas, www.transetco.com

Roofing Contractor: Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal, Longview, Texas, www.curtismckinleyroofing.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: 18-inch, 24-gauge PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad in Charcoal, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Wall Panels: 16-inch, 24-gauge HWP, Slate Gray and 12-inch, 24-gauge Flush Panel in Slate Gray, Teal, and Berkshire Blue, Petersen

Underlayment: TW Metal and Tile, TAMKO, www.tamko.com