Recycling Membrane Saves School District Money and Protects the Environment

More than 8,700 pounds of the existing PVC membrane was recycled as part of the Bishop Elementary School re-roofing project as part of Duro-Last Roofing’s Recycle Your Roof program. Superior Services RSH Inc.

When the roof on Bishop Elementary School outlived its warranty, the Lincoln Consolidated School District put the roof replacement project up for bid. The school district already had a specific product in mind, and that made things pretty straightforward for Superior Services RSH Inc., headquartered in Lansing, Michigan.

Founded in 1975, Superior Services focuses on commercial and industrial low-slope roofing. The company also has an architectural metals division and a dedicated service and maintenance department. According to Derek Heins, its vice president, the company works closely with Duro-Last Roofing, and that relationship was key to being awarded the bid to re-roof Bishop Elementary School in Ypsilanti, Michigan.

“The existing roof that was on this building was a Duro-Last roof. It had been on there for more than 20 years, and the school had been very happy with its performance,” Heins says. “Most of the other buildings in the Lincoln Consolidated School District have Duro-Last roofs, so they are really comfortable and really familiar with the product. The school likes the single-ply PVC and the reflectivity of the white membrane, and have been really happy with the performance.”

The recycled material was secured to pallets in a staging area and then taken to the Duro-Last factory on a trailer. The recycled material is used to make products including flooring, walkway pads, and concrete expansion joints.

During the bidding stage, Heins suggested a way the project could save money while putting less stress on the environment. “We suggested utilizing the Recycle Your Roof program with Duro-Last Roofing,” he says. Through the program, mechanically attached Duro-Last PVC membrane can be returned to the manufacturer at the end of its useful life.

Heins explained the benefits of the recycling program to the district, which included a lower installation cost. “You’re reducing landfill costs by not bringing in dumpsters and paying for disposal of the old membrane,” he notes. “We essentially take it directly to Duro-Last’s factory, where they grind up the material and use if for making products including flooring and rooftop walkway pads.”

The school district agreed, and more than 8,700 pounds of the existing PVC roofing membrane was recycled as part of the re-roofing project.

Removal and Replacement

The 77,000-square foot roof featured different elevations. The center area where the two wings met was divided into several sections, most separated by parapet walls. The roof also features a large skylight, which was replaced as part of the project. The site-specific safety plan incorporated for each section included a perimeter warning line system and personal fall arrest systems (PFAS). A guardrail system was set up around the skylight.

The first step was the tear-off. The roof removal process is critical for the recycling program. “When we started the project, we sliced the roof membrane at the fastening rows,” explains Heins. “By doing this, it allowed us to roll up the loose membrane between the fastening rows. The rows were approximately 5 feet wide. After rolling them up, we tack welded the rolled-up material using a hot-air welder.”

Superior Services RSH Inc. installed a new Duro-Tuff PVC roof system. Details included a custom-made Velux skylight and a Bilco roof hatch.

The rolls were removed from the roof with the assistance of a telehandler, stacked on pallets, and secured with straps. Crews then removed the fastening tabs and fasteners from the existing roof system, using screw guns to back out the fasteners from the metal deck.

The next step was inspecting the underlying polyiso insulation for any moisture, damage or deterioration. It was replaced as necessary, but the vast majority of it was reused, which offered additional cost savings.

New tapered drain sets were installed for all of the internal drains on the building. “We used the Duro-Guard insulation tapered drain sets,” Heins notes. “We cut out the existing insulation and put in new wider drain sets to help promote water flow on the roof.”

The tapered drain sets are prefabricated and pre-sloped. They are available in two sizes: 4 feet by 4 feet, and 8 feet by 8 feet. “We try to use larger size drain sets whenever possible,” Heins says. “They unfold to form an 8-foot box around the drain. The marked center circles allow you to simply lay it over the drain sump and cut out the sump opening.”

Crews then installed the 50-mil Duro-Tuff PVC roof system, which was mechanically attached. Enhancements at the perimeter were made using a RhinoBond induction welder.

“We install a hybrid perimeter using RhinoBond induction welding,” Heins explains. “We run two wind rows around the perimeter of the building. Then we roll out the 10-foot wide membrane rolls. With the membrane rolled out, we fasten it down per the manufacturer’s specifications. After we finish putting the membrane down, we go back and use the RhinoBond machine to weld the membrane down to all the perimeter plates for our wind laps.”

Final Details

Crews then installed prefabricated accessories, including custom-manufactured wall flashings, curb flashings, and stack flashings. Drains were fitted with new drain inserts and strainers. Crews also installed a new Bilco S-20 roof hatch.

Perimeter metal and copings were supplied by Exceptional Metals. “We used their two-piece compression metal,” Heins notes. “We also installed custom scupper collector boxes and downspouts on the project as well. By using Exceptional Metals, a division of Duro-Last, we were able to include everything in their Edge to Edge Warranty.”

Heins points to the large skylight as one of the most difficult details on the project. The existing skylight was replaced with a new custom-made Velux double dome skylight, which was installed after the roofing work was completed. When the new skylight arrived at the site, crew members lifted it to the roof and removed the existing skylight. The temporary flashings were replaced with new flashings as the new skylight was installed.

The biggest challenge on the job was the tight schedule. The project was completed in two weeks during July of 2019. “We had a limited window of time to complete this project,” says Heins. “Like most school construction projects, we were required to complete the roof during the summer break, making it essential to finish as much work as possible each day.”

Recycling

At the end of the project, the old membrane was put on a trailer and returned for recycling.

Heins is proud to promote the Recycle Your Roof program as a win-win proposition. “It’s best for everybody to be conscious of the environment,” he says. “We focus on being environmentally friendly, and we also focus on the cost savings. Recycling the membrane and reusing the insulation that is in in good condition offers a big cost reduction for our customers — and it keeps the material out of the landfill.”

According to Heins, this project highlights some of the strengths of Superior Services. “One of the things this project demonstrates is our commitment to utilizing the latest roofing technologies,” he says. “One example is Duro-Last’s prefabricated accessories. Duro-Last has always been a frontrunner in providing prefabricated and custom accessories, and Exceptional Metals offers further custom fabrication. It is important to us, as a company, to strive to be on the leading edge of technology, both on the roof and in the office. It’s part of our culture, as well as emphasizing sustainability and energy-efficient roofing.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Superior Services RSH, Inc., Lansing, Michigan, https://superiorservicesrsh.com

MATERIALS

Roofing Membrane: 50-mil Duro-Tuff PVC, Duro-Last, www.duro-last.com

Edge Metal: Exceptional Metals, www.exceptionalmetals.com

Roof Hatch: S-20 Type S Roof Hatch, BILCO, www.bilco.com

Skylight: Custom-Size Double Dome Acrylic Skylight, Velux, www.veluxusa.com

Duro-Last Recognizes Superior Services RSH, Inc. for Outstanding Michigan Recycling Project

Duro-Last, Inc. recognized Superior Services RSH, Inc. for their outstanding work on a recent rooftop recycling project in Ypsilanti, Michigan. The Lansing, Michigan-based commercial roofing contractor removed and recycled over 8,700 pounds of Duro-Last PVC roofing membrane, ensuring that the material found new life and remained out of the landfill.

Through Duro-Last’s Recycle Your Roof program, mechanically attached Duro-Last membrane at the end of its useful life on the rooftop can be returned to Duro-Last. This material is then repurposed into a variety of new products including resilient flooring, walkway pads, and concrete expansion joints. 

For this particular project, the Bishop Elementary School in Ypsilanti had a Duro-Last roof that had outlived its warranty and the administration was ready to replace it with a new Duro-Last system. The Superior Services team was able to remove over 77,000 square feet of membrane and ultimately save the district a significant amount of money.

“Our company culture focuses on environmental friendliness and sustainability so we’re excited when we have the opportunity to work on a project like this,” explained Superior Services Vice President Derek Heins. “When we proposed this option to the administration and highlighted that not only would they save money in disposal fees, they could help reduce their environmental impact, they were excited to participate.”

“The Superior Services team did a phenomenal job on this project, meticulously removing the existing membrane to ensure every bit of material could be recycled,” said Duro-Last Sustainability Specialist Katie Chapman. “We couldn’t have asked for a better outcome for this project, and it’s always rewarding to see the positive environmental impact that can be made by the thoughtful efforts of contractors like Superior Services.”

To learn more about Duro-Last’s sustainability efforts and Recycle Your Roof program, visit www.duro-last.com/sustainability 

For more information about Duro-Last, visit www.duro-last.com.

Duro-Last Quickly Retools to Manufacture Medical Supplies During Pandemic

Duro-Last reformulated its flexible PVC membranes and retooled equipment to manufacture medical gowns and masks to help hospitals facing equipment shortages. Photos: Duro-Last

As the coronavirus pandemic took hold, hospitals all over the world found themselves facing critical shortages of personal protective equipment (PPE). The state of Michigan was hit hard by the virus, and as news of critical supply shortages hit the media, team members at Saginaw, Michigan-based Duro-Last, Inc., came together determined to figure out a way to help.

According to Duro-Last CEO Tom Saeli, the group quickly developed a plan to manufacture medical PPE. “The genesis was that a small group of employees got together — people from engineering, sales, manufacturing, and R & D — and they were well aware of the crisis and the dire need for medical personal protective equipment at the hospitals. They got together on their own accord and came up with the idea to try to make medical gowns and non-surgical masks using our materials, processes and equipment.”

The meeting happened on Friday, March 20, and the group continued to work on it the next day. “On Saturday, they called me and said, ‘We’re making these because we know there’s a need,’” Saeli recalls. “I can’t take credit for any of this.”

Saeli, a member of the board of trustees at Beaumont Health, was in the perfect position to connect the team with the hospital. “We are well aware that Beaumont was the epicenter of the crisis in southeast Michigan for COVID-19 patients,” says Saeli. “I called them on Saturday, told them what we were doing, and the rest happened very quickly.”

Initial designs for masks and gowns were based on photos and schematics in the public domain. “Our people went up and down I-75 with gown and mask designs over the next few days, and they really nailed down a design that worked for Beaumont. By the following Friday, we were manufacturing product.”

Meeting a Need

The company, well known for manufacturing flexible PVC roofing membranes, converted equipment normally used to make roofing products for another use. “We have some very creative, clever people,” Saeli says. “Because we do so much custom fabrication, we were able to retool some of our equipment to manufacture this design for gowns and masks.”

The non-surgical masks, made from polyester and PVC, are washable and reusable. The gowns are made from flexible, transparent PVC and can be sanitized and reused.

The membrane itself was reformulated. The hospital gowns are made from flexible, transparent PVC that is 6 mils thick. The gowns are water- and fluid-repellant, and they can be sanitized and reused. The masks, made from polyester and PVC, can be washed and reused. Feedback from the hospital has been overwhelmingly positive. “There’s a big demand,” Saeli says. “We’re getting calls from all over the country for gowns and masks. There is also a trend for wearing masks in everyday life, including at jobsites, so the demand is just going to continue to increase. We are manufacturing 24 hours a day right now at our Saginaw plant, and it’s keeping more than 60 people employed.”

Duro-Last is looking to expand the capability to its seven plants across the country, but profit is not a motivator in this case. “We didn’t enter this for financial gain,” Saeli says. “We aren’t making a profit on this. We just did it because we saw a need that had to be served. It does help to employ some people, which is great as well. But the profit we are getting is an emotional profit, if you will. We’re doing this because it’s the right thing to be doing right now.”

The tight time frame to get the designs approved and equipment ready was probably the biggest challenge, according to Saeli. “It was the fastest product development I’ve ever seen,” he says. “The team just powered through any issues that came up. The mindset of our employees is to be very entrepreneurial, which goes back to our founder, John R. Burt. We are unique in our industry. We are the only ones who do custom fabrication. We’ve got a very entrepreneurial spirit that we encourage all the time. The DNA of our business is to take on challenges and come up with new ideas.”

As the products are being made, the company is taking precautions to ensure they are being manufactured safely. “For the last five weeks, we’ve been practicing social distancing,” Saeli notes. “We’ve been taking everyone’s temperature with a thermal forehead scanner when they come in and throughout the day. We clean and sanitize all of our equipment. We had our plant professionally disinfected. We are trying to do everything in our power to protect our employees.”

Duro-Last is encouraging other companies join the fight. “We had a call with SPRI, which includes many manufacturers in the industry, including our competitors, and we spoke with 25 people from around the county to tell others what we did, share our design with them, and encourage other companies to get involved any way they could in their local markets.”

The company is sharing the news with the media for the same reason. “We wanted to demonstrate to others that if a roofing manufacturer could do something, everyone else should look at it as well,” Saeli says. “We are sharing our story to encourage others to jump in and help any way they can.”

Non-Fleece PVC Spray Adhesive

Duro-Last introduces Duro-Last Solvent-Grip Spray Adhesive. According to the company, it is the first non-fleece PVC spray adhesive in the roofing industry. Duro-Last Solvent Grip is designed to improve rooftop productivity through efficient adhesion of Duro-Last and Duro-Tuff membranes to a variety of substrates on both horizontal and vertical surfaces. Additionally, when paired with the custom-fabricated Duro-Last Roofing System, contractors can significantly increase labor savings and finished aesthetics. 

When properly prepared following Duro-Last specifications, this low volatile organic compound (VOC) solvent-based adhesive can be applied using a self-contained spray system to structural concrete, wood, polyisocyanurate rigid insulation board, and Duro-Guard Cover Boards. 

Additional spray adhesive materials include the Duro-Last Solvent Grip Cleaner. This fast-drying solution is designed to clean Duro-Last Solvent Grip Spray Adhesive hoses and spray guns after application. 

“We are excited to continue expanding our catalog of industry-leading and labor reducing commercial roofing solutions,” said Steve Ruth, Vice President of Sales Operations at Duro-Last. “Duro-Last is known for providing contractors with unparalleled commercial roofing solutions from Edge-to-Edge & Deck-to-Sky, and Duro-Last Solvent-Grip Spray Adhesive is no different. This product will enable contractors to further enhance their rooftop efficiencies and provide building owners with continued watertight peace of mind, especially when paired with our innovative custom-fabricated roofing systems.” For more information, visit www.duro-last.com.

Duro-Last Produces Medical Personal Protection Equipment in Fight Against COVID-19

Hospitals across the globe are experiencing critical PPE supply shortages. Team members at Duro-Last, Inc., found a way to help. Duro-Last engineers, product development and manufacturing staff united to fabricate and manufacture isolation gowns and face masks. Utilizing expertise in manufacturing flexible PVC and fabrics, the team went from prototype to production to delivery in one week. 

The gowns are made from flexible PVC, making them water- and fluid-repellant. The masks are washable and reusable, made from polyester and PVC. Duro-Last reformulated products and retooled processes to manufacture these supplies. 

“This is about helping health care professionals in any way we can and at the same time keeping people employed,” said Tom Saeli, Duro-Last CEO. “I am very proud of and impressed by the people in our company who quickly developed these products. Our country is full of tremendously smart, entrepreneurial people who can bring timely solutions to this unprecedented need. The need is real and I believe it’s our obligation to act now. If the efforts of our team inspire just one other company to join this fight, it will be worth it.”

For more information about Duro-Last, visit www.duro-last.com.

Duro-Last Honors Contractor of the Year and Bestows Annual Project Awards

Duro-Last’s annual National Sales Seminar, held in Phoenix, Arizona, welcomed more than 1,300 guests representing more than 240 companies. The highly anticipated event honored multiple contractors for their outstanding dedication and workmanship over the past year. 

The top honor of 2019 Contractor of the Year was awarded to a longtime Duro-Last contractor during the annual Awards Banquet. Parsons Commercial Roofing from Waco, Texas, earned the Contractor of the Year distinction for their exceptional work, attention to detail, customer service, and outstanding sales throughout 2019. Parsons Commercial Roofing, an authorized Duro-Last contractor for more than 20 years, also earned the distinction of a Duro-Last Platinum contractor over this past year and made company history with over $11 million in sales. 

Additionally, Duro-Last Project Awards were recognized throughout Seminar activities for the fifth year in a row. This category-specific competition honored contractors who completed outstanding projects in six unique divisions. Award winners and categories included:

Project of the Year Award: Recognizing the project that best utilizes all aspects of a Duro-Last Roofing System and demonstrates a dedication to outstanding workmanship, best practices, innovation and customer service. Contractor: Di Pasqua Construction Inc. of West Palm Beach, Florida. Project: Deering Groves – Homestead, Florida.

Custom-Fabrication Award: Recognizing the project that best utilizes Duro-Last’s custom-fabricated membrane and accessories throughout the roofing system. Contractor: Northwest Building Specialists of North Bend, Oregon. Project: Marshfield High School – Coos Bay, Oregon. 

Edge-to-Edge & Deck-to-Sky Award: Recognizing the project that best utilizes Duro-Last products for the entire roofing system. Contractor: Sector Roofing of Ithaca, New YorkProject: Renaissance Apartments – Rochester, New York. 

Metal Roofing Award: Recognizing the project that best utilizes EXCEPTIONAL Metals metal roofing and wall panels. Contractor: Pressure Point Roofing of Central Point, Oregon. Project: Mazama Dormitory – Crater Lake National Park, Oregon. 

Sustainability Award: Recognizing the project that best utilizes Duro-Last products or services to reduce the environmental impact of the building. Contractor: Green Earth Energy Photovoltaic of East Windsor, Connecticut. Project: Harte Infinity Dealership, Harte Nissan Dealership – Hartford, Connecticut.

Specialty Membrane Award: Recognizing the project that best utilizes Duro-Last roll good products, including Rock-Plyand Shingle-Ply prints. Contractor: Lee’s Roofing & Spouting, Inc. of Bellefontaine, Ohio. Project: St. John Chrysostom Byzantine Catholic Church – Columbus, Ohio

For more information on the projects that were recognized during the Duro-Last National Sales Seminar, visit www.youtube.com/DuroLastRoofing to view the award videos.

For more information, visit www.duro-last.com.

Duro-Last Inc. Honors Contractors for Exceptional Service with A+ Service Award

Duro-Last recently recognized over 30 contractors with the first-ever Duro-Last A+ Service Award. This award recognizes authorized contractors that participate in Duro-Last’s new A+ Service Contractor Program, which was designed to oversee post-installation service requests by building owners.

To earn this recognition, participating contractors must consistently demonstrate excellent quality and timeliness in their workmanship, documentation, and customer service. They work closely with the building owner and Duro-Last to manage all aspects of the service request and ensure that the building owner’s needs are met.

“Duro-Last is proud to provide exceptional customer service at all stages of a roofing system investment, including post-installation needs,” said Mitch Guettler, Director of Quality Assurance and Warranty Services at Duro-Last. “We understand that customer care doesn’t end once the roofing system is installed, and we are committed to partnering with our dedicated network of contractors to ensure that building owners have access to quality care for the lifecycle of their investment.”

Congratulations to the contractors recognized with the 2018 Duro-Last A+ Service Award:

  • Fischer’s, Inc. – New Orleans, LA
  • Ace Roofing, Inc. – Lafayette, LA
  • Ciaccio Roofing – Omaha, NE
  • Reynolds Construction Co. – White Hall, AR
  • J.G. Roofing & Construction – Chilliwack, BC
  • Colorado Commercial Roofing, Inc. – Colorado Springs, CO
  • Goodmen Roofing LTD – Red Deer, AB
  • Goodmen Roofing (Calgary) LTD – Airdrie, AB
  • Frank Fiala Roofing, Inc. – Pleasanton, CA
  • McDonnell Roofing, Inc. – Anaheim, CA
  • Broken Arrow, Inc. – Tooele, UT
  • Premium Roof Services – Spring Valley, CA
  • Alternative Roofing Systems – Snohomish, WA
  • Harrison Roofing Company, Inc. – San Angelo, TX
  • Prime Source Construction – Burleson, TX
  • Mako Contracting & Roofing – Spring, TX
  • B &M Roofing Contractors – Rocky Mount, NC
  • Etheridge Roofing – Wilson, NC
  • Dempsey Roofing Company – Lakeland, FL
  • DCI – West Palm Beach, FL
  • K2 Summit – Deerfield Beach, FL
  • Leak Solutions – Birmingham, AL
  • Old South – Wetumpka, AL
  • Fortified Roofing – Anderson, SC
  • CMS Roofing, LLC – Irma, SC
  • C.E. Davis Contracting – Ford City, PA
  • Moser Roofing Solutions, LLC – Lancaster, PA
  • Saco Roofing – Saco, ME
  • Zimmer Roofing and Construction – Port Huron, MI
  • Roof Management Company, Inc. – Farmington Hills, MI
  • Superior Services RSH, Inc. – Lansing, MI
  • Overhead Inc. – Toledo, OH
  • Damschroder Roofing, LTD – Freemont, OH
  • Hermitage Roofing Company, Inc. – Ashland, VA
  • United Roofing Contractors – Middletown, VA
  • International Construction & Roof – Norfolk, VA
  • S & S Services, LLC – Hilham, TN
  • Royalty Roofing – Seymour, IN
  • Team Chateau Contracting, LLC – Annapolis, MD

For more information, visit www.duro-last.com.

During Hospital Expansion, Contractor Protects Patients – and the Environment

The recent expansion of Pella Regional Health Center included adding a new third floor to the hospital. Photos The Duerson Corporation.

It’s not often a roofing contractor installs a new roof on a building before removing the old one, but that was just one of the wrinkles encountered by The Duerson Corporation during the recent expansion of Pella Regional Health Center in Pella, Iowa. The project involved adding a new third floor to the existing two-story hospital without disrupting the care of the patients below.

Protecting patients and meeting the needs of the hospital were the top priorities on the project, but another key focus was sustainability. Thanks to the initiative of The Duerson Corporation and Duro-Last, the roof system manufacturer on the project, almost all of the components on the existing roof were recycled, including the membrane, insulation, screws and plates.

The Game Plan

Based in Altoona, Iowa, The Duerson Corporation has been in business since 1986, specializing in commercial and industrial roofing, both new construction and retrofit. Kirk Duer, the company’s president, and Tanner Duer, head of business development, shared their insights on the Pella Regional Health Center Project with Roofing.

The Duro-Last roofing system included a vapor barrier, polyiso insulation, a cover board, and 50-mil white PVC membrane. Details included custom-fabricated curb flashings, walkway pads, and edge metal. Photos The Duerson Corporation.

They note that the goal on every project is to meet the client’s needs. “The hospital is a good example of that,” Kirk notes. “We took care of some maintenance and leak issues in the beginning, and then as time went on and trust was established, we did some re-roofing projects for them. Then they did this addition. It all flowed very well together.”

In a nutshell, the expansion plan involved erecting the steel for the new third floor, adding the roof deck, and installing the new roof system. The existing roof was left in place during this phase of construction, as the hospital was still active. After the walls were completed, the old roof system could be removed and recycled, and finally the interior work could be completed.

The first step involved erecting the steel for the new third floor. Kirk credits the hospital administrators for detailed planning before the project even got underway. That was the reason the existing roof was home to multiple 2-foot-by-2-foot boxes, complete with curbs and flashing.

Kirk Duer (left) and Tanner Duer of The Duerson Corporation in Altoona, Iowa, made sustainability a key focus of their business after they started recycling PVC membrane as part of Duro-Last’s Roof Take Back Program. Photos The Duerson Corporation.

“Those boxes covered the steel from the I-beams that were coming out of the roof, ready to receive that third floor,” Kirk notes. “When those boxes were removed, they just took their new steel and went up. It’s one of the more unique things I’ve ever seen in my history in the industry.”

As the steel went up, flashing the newly exposed I-beams was the first phase of the roofing work. “In the very beginning, once the general contractor removed those boxes, we added membrane and insulation around the I-beams and made sure they were watertight while the steelworkers erected their steel,” Kirk notes. “It was critical to keep it watertight because they still had patients right beneath us.”

Installing the New Roof

The new roof system covered an area of 27,600 square feet, bordered on one side by a long, curved parapet. The roof was installed over a structurally sloped steel deck with internal drains. “The first thing we did was install a vapor barrier over the entire deck,” Tanner notes.

The system consisted of Duro-Guard polyiso insulation with an R-value of 30, DensDeck cover board, and 50-mil Duro-Last white PVC membrane. Details included custom-fabricated curb flashings, Roof Trak III walkway pads, and coping and edge metal from Exceptional Metals.

Hospital administrators wanted a warranty from one source, notes Kirk. “Duro-Last refers to it as edge to edge, deck to sky,” he says. “Every component is supplied by Duro-Last and warranted by them for a full-system warranty. This particular administrator is adamant that this is what he wanted, and that’s what we delivered for them.”

Weather was not an issue, but the crews had to be ready to move quickly in the event of emergencies. “Work took place in September and October, which is about the most beautiful time of the year for us,” says Tanner. “The only unusual thing was that we had to have walkie-talkies on us at all times so they could alert us whenever a helicopter was coming in. Plant ops would notify us when a helicopter was coming in, and basically anything we had in the air we had to move down to the ground. We obviously wanted to make sure Pella Regional was not going to have a problem with us when a patient was flying in.”

After the metal roof deck was in place, crews installed a vapor barrier. Photos The Duerson Corporation.

The roofing installation was pretty straightforward, notes Kirk. There was one area on the lower roof that was an exception, as the new construction blocked access to the drains. “Originally the roof sloped in one direction, but because of the design of the new part of the building, we had to change the slope,” he says. “We had to turn everything around so water would flow in the other direction.”

On this section, the existing roof was torn off and removed, and tapered insulation was used to provide the proper slope. It was installed on a concrete deck over a working section of the hospital, so the installation was a bit tricky. “Rather than starting at the drain, which would be the easiest thing to do, we had to start at the furthest point away,” Kirk notes. “We were adding so much insulation, we didn’t want to create a bathtub, if you will. We had to start at the high point and work our way downhill so when we got to the drain, we’d have the correct elevation.”

Recycling the Old One

Once the third floor was closed in for the winter, it was time to remove the existing roof. “That was the fun part,” Tanner says.

The old roof was removed through a window. “We had an opening that was approximately 5 feet wide and 4 feet

The new roof system covers 27,600 square feet of the new third floor in an area bordered on one side by a long, curved parapet. Photos The Duerson Corporation.

tall,” Tanner recalls. “We took a fork lift with a BOXhaul on it and basically went up to the outside of the window and stuck it in there as far as we could without damaging any of the structure and started removing the material.”

No gas-powered vehicles were allowed to operate in the interior space. The fasteners had to be unscrewed and separated by hand. “When we removed the material, we tried to cut along the seams so we could see the screws and plates,” notes Tanner. “We sorted those out, and in the end we had more than 1,000 pounds of screws and plates we took back to our shop to be recycled.”

The existing membrane was cut up into 5-foot strips. Sections were rolled up and bundled for removal using a portable bander. Once the BOXhaul was full, it was taken to a flatbed trailer. “We completely filled the 20-foot trailer with old material to be recycled,” Tanner says. “In the end, there was 7,200 pounds of Duro-Last membrane that we recycled.”

The membrane was recycled as part of Duro-Last’s Roof Take Back Program. The company recycles the membrane, using it to construct products including walkway pads. “We’re lucky enough to have a Duro-Last plant in our state, and I actually took that load of material to be recycled to Sigourney one day,” Tanner says. “When I got there, they took a fork lift out there and unloaded it for me.”

The expanded polystyrene insulation was also removed and recycled. It was taken to Insulfoam, the original manufacturer. “The insulation necessitated a few more trips because it was so bulky,” Tanner says. “We kept an empty tractor trailer on site. In the end, we filled up three of those with approximately 120,000 board-feet of insulation that we took off of that project.”

The membrane that once covered the existing roof was cut into strips and rolled up for transport to the plant for recycling. Photos The Duerson Corporation.

The Duerson Corporation recycles as much material as it can throughout the year, including scrap metal and PVC membrane, which is stored in Duro-Last approved containers until there is enough to be transported to the plant.

“I thank Katie Chapman at Duro-Last for getting this program up and running and making us aware of it,” says Kirk. “Otherwise, that material would’ve just ended up in a landfill.”

Participating in the membrane recycling program was an eye-opener for everyone at the company. “One thing leads to another,” Kirk says. “We started recycling the roof membrane, and then you realize that there are other things you should think about. What do we do with the insulation? What do we do with the screws and plates? We started looking for ways to recycle everything, and pretty soon a full-blown sustainability program is born. It really does change the way you think once you buy into the system.”

The New Floor of the Hospital

After the general contractor removed the old vapor barrier with a floor scraper, the new third floor section was converted into a brand-new, pristine Obstetrics and Gynecology unit. The difference between the construction site and state-of-the-art hospital wing is striking.

The third floor of the hospital now houses a brand-new Obstetrics and Gynecology unit. Photos The Duerson Corporation.

“What we knew as the concrete roof deck was also designed to serve as the finished floor of the hospital,” Kirk says. “The new O.B. unit is just beautiful. If you look at that you can’t even imagine, unless you’ve been through the whole process, that the area with carpet and tile you’re looking at months ago used to be the roof.”

Safety for the roofing crews is always a priority at The Duerson Corporation, but safety precautions on this project also included ensuring the safety and security of the people in the hospital. “It was critical that we were always aware of the patients underneath us,” Kirk notes. “We had to be very mindful about the positioning of our generators, for example, so the exhaust wouldn’t be sucked into the fresh air intakes.”

Tanner points out that a checklist is prepared for each project to make sure everyone is aware of the client’s needs. This is especially important in health care projects like this one. “If someone goes out to take care of a leak call, for instance, we make sure they know everything they need to know to keep the client happy,” Tanner says. “With a health center, you have to take extra precautions. This can include items like making sure when you’re walking across the open roof that you don’t look into a patient’s room.”

“We’ve learned a great deal from working with Pella Regional Health Center in terms of just how mindful of everything we need to be,” Kirk says. “We recognize each of our clients, even though they all have a roof over their head, they all do something different for a living. In reality, everybody in any trade needs to recognize what your client does and what you need to do to be mindful of that.”

It takes communication to understand clients’ needs and build long-term relationships with customers. “We’ve got clients that we’ve serviced for 26 years,” Kirk says. “We’re all here to serve other people. In our case, it’s in roofing. Whether it’s a hospital or a convenience store, we’re serving them, and it all starts with that relationship.”

TEAM

Architect: Shive Hattery Architecture & Engineering, West Des Moines, Iowa, www.shive-hattery.com
General Contractor: Graham Construction, Des Moines, Iowa, www.grahamconstruction.com
Roofing Contractor: The Duerson Corporation, Altoona, Iowa, www.duersoncorporation.com

MATERIALS

Membrane: 50-mil Duro-Last white PVC membrane, Duro-Last, www.durolast.com
Insulation: Duro-Guard Polyiso, Duro-Last
Vapor Barrier: Duro-Last Vapor Barrier, Duro-Last
Coping: Coping and 2-piece edge metal, EXCEPTIONAL Metals, www.exceptionalmetals.com
Cover Board: DensDeck, Georgia-Pacific, www.densdeck.com

Elastomeric Coating Line Offers High Reflectivity

Duro-Last introduces its line of Duro-Shield Coatings and MaterialsDuro-Last introduces its line of Duro-Shield Coatings and Materials, available in Duro-Shield 20, Duro-Shield 10 and Duro-Shield 5. Duro-Shield Roof Coatings are 100 percent elastomeric acrylic with a white finish that reflects the sun’s rays, which can lower heat buildup and reduce utility costs. Duro-Shield 20 offers 35 mils of coverage when dry and a 20-year limited warranty. Duro-Shield 10 features 24 mils of coverage when dry and a 10-year limited warranty. Duro-Shield 5 offers 20 mils of coverage when dry and a five-year limited warranty. Additional products in the Duro-Shield line include Duro-Shield Primer, Duro-Shield Brush Grade Mastic and Polyester Reinforcement Fabric.

Duro-Last Single-Ply Roofing Membranes Earn Platinum Certification

Duro-Last announces that it has achieved platinum certification under the NSF American National Standard for Sustainable Roofing Membranes, NSF/ANSI 347. Certified by UL, this standard represents that Duro-Last manufactures a product that is third-party verified as sustainable, durable, and high performing. The certification applies to 40, 50 and 60 mil, white, tan, gray and dark gray as well as 50 mil terra cotta Duro-Last membranes.
 
“Duro-Last was excited to have most of our membrane product lines certified by this third-party standard,” says Jason Tunney, executive vice president and general counsel of Duro-Last. “But we wanted to take it to the next level and achieve the highest rating possible.”
 
NSF/ANSI 347 was written by NSF International and, according to their website, is based on life-cycle assessment principles. NSF/ANSI 347 employs a point system to evaluate roofing membranes against established prerequisite requirements, performance criteria and quantifiable metrics in five key areas:

  • Product design
  • Product manufacturing
  • Membrane durability
  • Corporate governance
  • Innovation

 
Obtaining this certification will help the Duro-Last membrane meet the market demand for products that comply with green building standards like the Green Building Initiative’s Green Globes. Product specifiers and purchasers are under pressure to find products that meet their sustainability criteria, and having the NSF 347 certification can give them the peace of mind of specifying a third-party verified product.
 
This certification is one more step in Duro-Last’s commitment to sustainability and transparency, coming after the announcement of the publication of Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for Duro-Tuff, Duro-Fleece and Duro-Last EV membranes. To read more about Duro-Last’s sustainability efforts, visit here.
 
“There’s talk in the roofing industry about being ‘green’ and sustainable,” says Katie Chapman, Duro-Last corporate sustainability specialist. “At Duro-Last we want to help people make informed decisions when purchasing roofing products.”
 
For more information regarding Duro-Last’s sustainability initiatives contact Katie Chapman at (800)248-0280 or kchapman@duro-last.com.