Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters Boasts One of World’s Largest Green Roofs

The Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters Building in Washington, D.C., has more than 550,000 square feet of green roof space. Photos: Owens Corning

Like a 550,000-square-foot sponge, the vegetative roof assembly (VRA) atop the Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters Building in Washington, D.C., absorbs rainfall while managing its release into the city’s sewer system. Green roofs are a storm water management “best practice” in the nation’s capital, which boasts more than 3.2 million square feet of green roof space.

Gordon Contractors installed the green roof on the 11-level, 1.2-million-square-foot headquarters, which is also home to several independent field commands including the National Pollution Fund Center and Marine Safety Center. Key performance objectives included complying with D.C.’s stringent storm water regulations, as well as federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules requiring 95 percent of storm water to be collected onsite.

Beyond complying with local and federal storm water mandates, the project team creating the vegetative roof sought to create a rooftop habitat that supports biodiversity and helps birds and other wildlife thrive. The result of a careful and collaborative approach to moisture management is a high-performing roof that ultimately received LEED Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. Working as a system, the roof’s components help reduce rainwater runoff while helping to reduce pollutant loads and protect natural resources such as the nearby Chesapeake Bay.

Numerous Challenges

As every roofer knows, no two projects are alike. The location of the Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters on hilly terrain provided plenty of natural obstacles, including nine of the eleven levels being built into a hillside. The site

Gordon Contractors installed the green roof on the 11-level headquarters. Performance objectives included complying with D.C.’s stringent storm water regulations, as well as federal EPA rules requiring 95 percent of storm water to be collected onsite. Photos: Owens Corning

features a series of stair-stepped green roof terraces that help gradually move water from higher to lower levels and eventually into a pond through elevation changes of 120 feet. According to Steve Gordon, president of Preservation & Protection Systems Inc. (PPSI), the company providing design and installation support with the Owens Corning FOAMULAR extruded polystyrene insulation and Henry 790-11 Hot Rubberized Asphalt used in the VRA, the stair-step design required a complex approach to the roof’s varied elevations. To meet this challenge a complex network of expansion joints by EMSEAL tied together multiple air barriers within the system. Another challenge was the magnitude of the project, spanning more than a half-million feet across multiple levels and 176 acres. Timing was critical, as plants and vegetation required quick delivery and transplanting into their new environment, particularly during D.C.’s sweltering summers. These living materials couldn’t simply be covered with a tarp until better conditions prevailed, but had to be quickly transported, installed and irrigated.

The Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters serves 4,000 occupants, so comfort and energy efficiency were important concerns. From the outset of the project, the integrated roofing team was tasked with designing a vegetative roof assembly that would help decrease the building’s heating and cooling energy usage, lower long-term maintenance costs and extend the life of the roof.

A Solution to Achieve Performance Goals

The project team selected a Protected Roof Membrane Assembly (PRMA) to deliver the water management required to meet storm water mandates, as well as deliver energy efficiency through R-value performance and strength to support vegetation requirements. The PRMA places the insulation layer above the waterproofing membrane, a reversal of traditional roof systems. PPSI recommended Owens Corning FOAMULAR 404 and 604 extruded polystyrene (XPS) insulations for use in the PRMA. The water resistance and compressive strength of the XPS insulation provided the integrity needed for long-term roof performance and helped the Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters Building ultimately achieve LEED Gold certification.

The Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters was built on hilly terrain, and nine of the eleven levels were built into a hillside. The stair-stepped green roof terraces help gradually move water from higher to lower levels and eventually into a pond. Photos: Owens Corning

Given the sheer size of the project, it was inevitable that the roofing team would encounter several scenarios requiring strategic problem-solving throughout the installation. For example, the team adjustedthe engineered soil specification to reduce the loads within the structural tolerances for the roof structure and carefully addressed a range of pH, moisture, organic matter and nutrient levels to support the variety of plants. Not only did such careful attention deliver strength performance, it’s also achieved the objective of attracting wildlife. The terraced landscape has welcomed not only birds and butterflies, but the occasional deer wandering onto a rooftop.

Evaluating Results

Since its completion, the VRA at the Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters has attracted widespread attention from landscaping groups, engineering firms and organizations interested in sustainability. These groups are interested not just in the building’s unique design but in its resilience and performance. Steve Gordon of PPSI says the resilience of the headquarters’ roof is reflected in its record of no leaks. “We’ve had no leaks,” Gordon says. “The reason we use hot fluid applied waterproofing on green roofs is because we want to avoid any leaks in the building. At the end of the day, the biggest liability in a roof is water.”

After successfully navigating a range of challenges and opportunities, the U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters’ VRA epitomizes the convergence of aesthetics and performance and is recognizedas one of the largest green roofs in the world.According to the Landscape Performance Foundation, the headquarters’ vegetative roof retains up to 424,000 gallons of rainwater.

In a small way, the performance reflects the integrity of a hero an Act of Congress honored when naming the headquarters, according to Captain Will Smith, Commanding Officer U.S. Coast Guard Base NCR. Captain Smith noted, “The Coast Guard’s only Medal of Honor recipient, Douglas Munro earned the award for his selfless sacrifice as a landing craft pilot at Guadalcanal while evacuating marines from a beachhead under heavy fire from enemy forces.”

TEAM

Architect: WDG, Washington, D.C., www.wdgarch.com
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, Bethesda, Maryland, www.clarkconstruction.com
Roofing Contractor: Gordon Contractors, Capitol Heights, Maryland, www.gordoncontractors.com
Independent Rep Agency: Preservation & Protection Systems Inc. (PPSI), Laurel, Maryland, www.ppsimd.com

MATERIALS

Insulation: FOAMULAR 404 and 604 extruded polystyrene, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com
Waterproofing Membrane: 790-11 Hot Rubberized Asphalt, Henry Company, https://us.henry.com
Expansion Joints: EMSEAL, www.emseal.com
Pavers: Hanover Architectural Products, www.hanoverpavers.com
Sedum Mats: Sempergreen, www.sempergreen.com

The Hatch Memorial Shell Shows Off New Roof at 4th of July Celebration

The Boston Pops perform at The Hatch Memorial Shell on July 4, 2018. Photo: Walter Mulligan Photography

The Boston Pops perform at The Hatch Memorial Shell on July 4, 2018. Photo: Walter Mulligan Photography

In an annual tradition, Boston kicks off its outdoor summer concert series with a nationally televised performance by The Boston Pops Orchestra on the 4thof July while fireworks snap and sparkle. The Pops perform from The Hatch Memorial Shell, an amphitheater shaped like the quarter of an orange that opens to the crowd on the Charles River Esplanade.

The difficulty of waterproofing this curved structure became apparent after the Massachusetts Department of Conservation & Recreation (DCR), owner and manager of the Hatch Shell put out a bid for a new roof around Labor Day in 2017. The specification called for a single-ply EPDM sheet with pre-cast concrete panels set atop pedestals as an aesthetic outer shell.

Folan Waterproofing & Construction Co. Inc. of South Easton, Massachusetts, the general contractor, handled the overall project as well as demolition of an old terrazzo roof and installation of the new pre-cast concrete panels. Executive manager Patrick Folan worked closely with roofing contractor John F. Shea Company of Mattapan, Massachusetts, which was responsible for the waterproofing installation.

Working from cloud point data, lasers marked the position of the 1,476 pedestals that would hold the 3-inch thick concrete panels in place on the curved structure. Photo: Kemper System America Inc.

Shea Company project manager Michael Frank, RRC, reviewed the installation challenges with Folan. The EPDM sheet would need to be cut into multiple slices, and then require full adhesion to the curved roof deck as well as along all the lap seams. The pedestals for the 665 concrete panels also posed an issue since the anchor studs would penetrate the EPDM sheet. There would be nearly 4,500 penetrations on the job for the 1,476 stainless steel pedestals alone. No EPDM manufacturer would warrant the installation.

After the contract was awarded in October 2017, the construction team suggested an alternative inspired by a recent project for a youth center in Cambridge. There Shea Company used the Kemperol 2K-PUR liquid-applied reinforced membrane system to waterproof below a plaza deck topped with pedestals and pavers. The DCR and Boston architectural firm Bargmann Hendrie + Archetype Inc. gave the team a green light to explore further.

“The point we made was that because we are dealing with such an odd shape and with so many penetrations for the studs, it would be much easier to install the Kemperol liquid-applied system,” Frank says. “With the single-ply EPDM sheet, there would be ‘miles’ of field seams and, of course, every time you have a lap joint, you have areas that may be suspect at some point for leaking.”

The team contacted Kemperol manufacturer, Kemper System America Inc. of West Seneca, New York, and detailed specifications for the assembly along with cost estimates were presented to the owner and architect about two weeks later. “Obviously, there was a change in installed cost, but it was almost immediately accepted. So, we needed to completely shift gears, and revise our shop drawings and submittals accordingly,” Frank says. Among other things, the design of the stainless steel pedestals was modified to allow the panels to rest a couple of inches above the new reinforced membrane.

Air hammers were used to remove the aging terrazzo and concrete layer. Photo: Kemper System America Inc.

The surface preparation for the waterproofing started in April 2018, with a late May project completion target. The Folan crew removed the old cast-in-place terrazzo roofing system with air hammers and then peeled back an existing neoprene membrane to expose the structural concrete deck. Before the waterproofing membrane could be applied, Folan completely tented the roof with winter enclosures around the scaffolding, and then added diesel heaters to maintain the temperature above 40 degrees F.

Shea Company worked the job across the top of the structure and down row-by-row. After applying a Kempertec EP primer, crews applied Kemperol 2K-PUR resin with high-nap rollers a section at a time while laying Kemperol reinforcement into the resin from 20-foot rolls. Each roll was pre-cut lengthwise and then rerolled so it could be smoothly laid onto the curved surface. This was closely followed by a topcoat of the resin to fully embed the reinforcement in the resin. The system fully adheres to the deck and creates a monolithic watertight surface.

Securing the Anchors

Each pedestal needed to be precisely positioned and anchored into place through the membrane, so the epoxy anchoring system for the studs was key to the project.

The team from John F. Shea Company waterproofed the concrete roof deck with a Kemperol liquid-applied reinforced membrane system. Photo: Kemper System America Inc.

The team from John F. Shea Company waterproofed the concrete roof deck with a Kemperol liquid-applied reinforced membrane system. Photo: Kemper System America Inc.

After the membrane fully cured, 3-D measurements were taken across the dome with point cloud software to help determine the height difference between the surface of the membrane and the desired finished elevation for the pre-cast panels. The surveying firm that made the measurements returned when it was time to set the pedestals.

“Their surveyors marked out the dome with lasers. They would set a mark, and say, ‘This is your point for four panels, and this is the cavity depth for the finished panel elevation,’” Folan explains. There was also GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar) scanning performed to locate existing reinforcement in the original structural concrete. His firm carefully drilled holes for the threaded studs to avoid the existing reinforcing steel, and the studs were then set in epoxy. Shea Company then applied GreatSeal PE-150 sealant around the pedestals and the heads of the bolts.

“Kemper System provided this detail, and they wanted the epoxy to ooze out of the pre-drilled holes when the anchors were inserted,” he says. “We would then hang the pedestals on the studs, and screw nuts onto the studs to hold the pedestal in place.”

The Folan team needed to wait for an architectural review of the pre-cast concrete panels before they could be installed. They were not all the same, but designed and numbered like puzzle pieces for their location on the shell. The 3-inch thick panels averaged 3 feet by 4 feet, and needed to be lowered by crane since they ranged from about 350 to 550 pounds each.

The studs for the pedestals were epoxied in place through the Kemperol membrane and top-sealed with GreatSeal construction sealant, also from Kemper System. Photo: Kemper System America Inc.

The panels were installed row-by-row starting at the bottom with 3/4-inch open joints between. “The biggest factor at that point was the depth of the cavity. Before we set a pedestal, we needed to know whether it should be shimmed 1/16th, 1/8th or 1/4 inch,” Folan says.

Though the panel fabrication process started late, the team worked six days a week with some 10-hour days to complete the job by a final June 15thdeadline. “As fast as they could get us the pre-cast panels, we were putting them in,” he recalls.

Looking back, Folan says the pedestals would have required much more time to install if the Kemperol system had not been selected, since there were nearly 1,500 of them and each would need to be covered with EPDM. “With the Kemper System detail, we could just keep moving to meet the deadline in time for the big July 4thcelebration.”

TEAM

Architect: Bargmann Hendrie + Archetype Inc., Boston, https://bhplus.com
General Contractor: Folan Waterproofing & Construction Co. Inc., South Easton, Massachusetts, www.folanwaterproofing.com
Roofing Contractor: John F. Shea Company of Mattapan, Massachusetts, www.johnfshea.com

MATERIALS

Liquid-Applied Waterproofing System: Kemperol 2K-PUR liquid-applied reinforced membrane system, Kemper System America Inc., West Seneca, New York, www.kemper-system.com

Recreation Center’s Innovative Roof and Wall Systems Provide Added Durability

Indian River County Intergenerational Recreation Center hosts recreational and competitive sporting events and other community activities. Photos: Borrelli + Partners

Indian River County Intergenerational Recreation Center was designed to be the hub of its community, a venue that hosts recreational and competitive sports and other activities, including educational, social and philanthropic events.

The new $10.4 million facility, branded by the county as the “iG Center” and often referred to as “Big Red,” consists of two adjoining main buildings: the two-story gymnasium and a long, single-story wing that houses various multi-purpose rooms, a concession area, a game room and a catering kitchen.

The site’s location near the oceanfront in Vero Beach, Florida, is susceptible to hurricanes and other extreme weather events, and making sure the complex would stand up to the elements was a key consideration for officials and residents in the county. This concern prompted a focus on the design of the building’s exterior envelope. In the end, a metal roof and metal wall panels were the key to meeting the building’s design goals.

Design Criteria

When county officials spoke with the architects at Borrelli + Partners, they had a strict set of criteria in mind for the building, including the ability to withstand high wind speeds and 100-year rainstorms. “They mandated a sloped roofing system,” notes Dan-Michael Trbovich of Borrelli + Partners. “They wanted a minimum 20-year warranty, and they said they were looking for a ‘50-year roof.’ This affected the roof design and the wall design.”

The new $10.4 million facility was designed to stand up to hurricanes, torrential rains and extreme fluctuations in temperature. Photos: Atlantic Roofing II of Vero Beach Inc.

A key goal of the team at Borrelli + Partners was to specify a watertight metal roof system that would also allow unlimited thermal movement to cope with extreme temperature fluctuations. They found what they were looking for in a standing seam metal roof and wall system manufactured by IMETCO.

The 37-acre site and open park setting also provided the opportunity to explore interesting aesthetic elements. The building would be highly visible, and goals included a dynamic exterior design that would allow the park and the building complement each other. In the end, the decision was made to go with bright red and white metal panels that would stand against the blue sky to create what Trbovich calls an “All-American design.”

In one of many daring design elements, sections of the red roof panels were folded over and brought down to the ground to serve as wall panels. A custom detail was devised to make the transition impervious to water penetration.

“Our criteria included a kneecap—a premanufactured fixture that would be put over the entire thing,” Trbovich says. “IMETCO was the only manufacturer we knew that offered that, and it was absolutely critical in the design.”

Areas in which the panels were turned over included the south-facing wall, which was no coincidence. “We wanted to make sure the south-facing wall didn’t get too much heat, so what you’re essentially doing is creating a vented roof decking system that protects the vertical surface on the south side,” notes Trbovich.

High summer temperatures and afternoon rains in Vero Beach can cause a lot of expansion and contraction, so HVAC and plumbing systems were rerouted to avoid the roof. “There is not a single roof penetration,” Trbovich says. “We wanted to make sure that roof would be able to move and slide. We wanted to make sure there were no contraction points that would hang it up, therefore we went with a design that would not allow roofing penetrations, whether it was a vent pipe, air duct or air-handling unit.”

Detailing was meticulous and consistent throughout, according to Trbovich. Flashing details were all designed to have a 6-inch overlap. “We went to extreme levels of detailing, whether it was in section cuts or in isometric cuts, to make sure that each and every one of those flashing details had that same 6-inch overlap. We required those be uniform across the facility on all corners, so that we essentially matched rake, eave jamb and corner flashing details.”

Installation Challenges

To ensure the details were correctly installed in the field, the architect and manufacturer worked closely during construction with the general contractor, KAST Construction, and the installer, Atlantic Roofing II of Vero Beach Inc.

The building’s exterior envelope features a metal roof system and metal wall panels manufactured by IMETCO. Photos: Borrelli + Partners

Atlantic Roofing IIapplied the standing seam roof system and metal wall panels, as well as a small single-ply roof on a flat section near the entryway. IMETCO Series 300 panels in Cardinal Red were installed on both the roof and walls, while white IMETCO Latitude panels were also installed on the walls.

The metal roof system was installed over the structure’s metal deck. It included 3 inches of polyiso insulation, 5/8-inch DensDeck and Aqua-Block 50 peel and stick, high-temperature underlayment.

The absence of penetrations simplified the metal roof installation, notes Steven Cottrell, project manager and chief estimator for Atlantic Roofing II. “The panels were rolled right on the site, and the longest ones up there are 168 feet long,” he says.

The roll former was stationed on the ground, and panels were lifted to the roof with a special cradle. “IMETCO brought out the metal and provided the machinery to roll them out, and the panels were placed onto giant spacer bars and loaded onto the roof,” Cottrell explains. “It was a bit of a challenge. We had 20 men up on the roof unloading them.”

The flat roof sections connecting the two buildings and the entryway were covered with a Seaman FiberTite KEE membrane, which was fully adhered over 3 inches of polyiso, tapered insulation and 5/8-inch DensDeck.

The roof system features a large internal gutter, which was lined with the same FiberTite roof system. Metal panels drop into the gutter and pick up on the other side, so it was crucial to ensure the area would be watertight and the panels would line up perfectly. “We worked closely with the architect and manufacturer on that,” notes Cottrell. “We used their eave detail and high eave detail, and it worked very well.”

Elegant Solutions

According to Cottrell, the roof and wall installations went smoothly and the roof is performing well — despite a hurricane and a 100-year rainstorm. “We’ve had no leaks, zero callbacks,” he says.

Photos: Borrelli + Partners

As the building was completed, Borrelli + Partners worked with the county to design the landscaping around the structure. “Our architects and interior designers work very closely with the landscape crew,” Trbovich notes. “We’re concerned about the physical space — external, internal, architectural and throughout. It’s a real holistic design approach, and you don’t see that with most architectural firms.”

The result is a project that Cottrell and Trbovich point to with pride. “It’s a unique structure,” says Cottrell. “It was a challenging project, but we rose to the challenge and banged it out. It’s like a little star for us on the fridge, if you know what I mean.”

For Trbovich, what stands out the most is the marriage of form and function in the many details. “While the building looks interesting with the awning and the striking form of the red standing seam roof, what’s crucially important is all the things we just talked about that are embedded in that design — the solutions themselves.”

TEAM

Architect: Borrelli + Partners, Orlando, Florida, www.borrelliarchitects.com
General Contractor: KAST Construction, West Palm Beach, Florida, www.kastbuild.com
Roof System and Wall System Installer: Atlantic Roofing II of Vero Beach Inc., Vero Beach, Florida, www.atlanticroofing2.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof Panels: Series 300 in Cardinal Red, IMETCO, www.imetco.com
Metal Wall Panels: Series 300 in Cardinal Red and Latitude in White, IMETCO
Underlayment: Aqua-Block 50, IMETCO
Cover Board: 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.densdeck.com
Single-Ply Membrane: 50-mil FiberTite XT KEE, Seaman Corporation, www.fibertite.com

Insulated Metal Panels Lend New Rec Center Weather and Fire Performance

Photos: Metl-Span

The new Lander County Recreation Center, also known as “BM Rec” to area residents, provides a daily splash of energy and enthusiasm to the quiet mining community of Battle Mountain, Nevada. Featuring bold, ribbed insulated metal panels, single-skin rainscreen panels and a standing seam roofing system, the project showcases a comprehensive metal building envelope and the best in performance and aesthetics offered by NCI Building Systems Inc.

Designed by VanWoert Bigotti Architects, the Lander County Recreation Center strikes the perfect balance between industrial and commercial architecture. The project pairs a steel frame system by Star Building Systems with more than 50,000 square feet of metal panels by Metl-Span and MBCI.

Metl-Span insulated metal panels make up the bulk of the project’s high-performance metal exterior, providing thermal and moisture performance in a single, easy-to-install component. Designers blended 16,997 square feet of the ribbed 7.2 Insul-Rib profile with 4,595 square feet of lightly-corrugated CF Mesa panels for dramatic wall relief. Specified in both Charcoal Gray and Igloo White, the insulated metal panels provide exceptional aesthetic versatility.

While the 3-inch insulated metal panels boast an exceptional R-value of 23.58, the project team was equally impressed with the product’s unique, single-component construction. The ease of installation creates a weathertight building envelope after just one pass, creating efficiencies throughout the construction process.

Lander County Recreation Center showcases a comprehensive metal building envelope, with bold, ribbed insulated metal panels, single-skin rainscreen panels and a standing seam roof system. Photos: Metl-Span

The insulated metal panel system was installed without a hitch, according to Larry Rogers, owner of G&S Construction. As first-time Metl-Span IMP installers, Rogers and his team of builders underwent training at the nearby Metl-Span West manufacturing facility in Las Vegas.

“Everything went up smoothly,” Rogers says. “I’ve heard nothing but positive reactions from the architect and the building owners.”

Designers accented the ribbed insulated metal panels in Charcoal Gray with a custom green single-skin metal panel from MBCI that provides aesthetic harmony with interior design and signage elements. The bold green exterior also serves as the project’s aesthetic focal point, drawing attention to the street-facing entrance.

“The lime green panels really strike the eye,” notes Associate Project Manager Charlie Grundy, VanWoert Bigotti Architects. “We wanted to inject some personality and energy to the project, and I think it was a big success.”

The project also incorporates fire-rated insulated metal panels, featured solely on a storage facility on the eastern side of the building’s perimeter. While not part of the initial design, Lander County Recreation Center representatives requested additional storage space to meet the needs of its growing suite of programs and activities. Measuring approximately 600 square feet, the new addition “called for a firewall because of its proximity to a nearby school to meet codes,” Rogers said.

The team from VanWoert Bigotti did not hesitate to specify Metl-Span ThermalSafe panels. “The fire-rated panels were required at the common area between the Battle Mountain Junior High School gymnasium building and the storage building,” says Armando Velazquez, building service representative with Star Building Systems.

The building was crowned with a standing seam roof comprised of 22,853 square feet of 24-gauge CFR insulated metal standing seam roof panels. The roof panels are exposed on the interior. Photos: Metl-Span

ThermalSafe mineral wool panels combine exceptional fire-resistance with the thermal and moisture performance that can be expected from Metl-Span insulated metal panels. The product’s unique LockGuard interlocking side joint further enhances the fire-resistant performance of the panel with its tongue-and-groove engagement of the mineral wool core. The fire-rated panel also offers excellent structural characteristics and span capability.

The Lander County Recreation Center incorporates 972 square feet of 24-gauge, 4-inch ThermalSafe insulated metal panels with a Light Mesa profile and matching Charcoal Gray hue.

To complete the all-metal building envelope, VanWoert Bigotti Architects specified 22,853 square feet of 24-gauge CFR insulated metal standing seam roof panels. Featuring 2-inch standing seams with the lightly-corrugated Mesa profile, the CFR panels are exposed on the interior for smooth sightlines and a modern aesthetic appearance.

The product combines durable exterior and interior faces of Galvalume steel with Metl-Span’s unmatched polyurethane insulating core. Factory-cut panel ends and factory notching eliminate field work and erection costs, while weathertight vertical side seaming leads to additional installation efficiencies.

Battle Mountain residents celebrated the grand opening of the new Lander County Recreation Center with two days of free admission in July 2017.

TEAM

Architect: VanWoert Bigotti Architects, Reno, Nevada, www.vwbarchitects.com
General Contractor: Core Construction, Reno, Nevada, www.coreconstruction.com
IMP Installer: G&S Construction, Battle Mountain, Nevada,

MATERIALS

Insulated Metal Panels: Insul-Rib and CF Mesa panels, Metl-Span, www.metlspan.com
Roof Panels: 24-gauge Mesa CFR insulated metal standing seam roof panels, Metl-Span
Metal Accent Panels: Custom green metal panels, MBCI, www.mbci.com