Detailed Work on California Home’s Unique Roof Wins Prestigious Award

Photos: IB Roof Systems

Premium Roof Services was built on the philosophy that good relationships are good business. Founded in 1996, Premium Roof Services is proud of its team of skilled roofers, who have more than half a century of experience. Their level of quality workmanship was showcased on a recent residential project in Cardiff, California. The Palm residence was named the Residential Project of the Year by IB Roof Systems, the manufacturer of the PVC roof system installed on the project.

This custom home showcases spectacular ocean views and stunning architecture. Premium Roof Services replaced the 6,000-square-foot roof, which is configured in a unique shape with rounded edges. After removing two layers of old roofing, crews inspected and replaced the damaged sheathing. They then installed Securock cover board over the wood deck, followed by a 50-mil white PVC roof system from IB Roof, which was mechanically attached. The newly installed roof system was accompanied by custom copper and two-piece compression edge trim. The entire project took seven days to complete.

This beautiful estate, which has the ocean as its backdrop, posed some installation challenges, beginning with the abstract configuration of the roof. “Due to its unusual shape and scale, the estimating process needed close attention,” says Peter Codallos, president of Premium Roof Services. “The material yield/waste factor was close to 25 percent. Due to the owner’s request, we attained copper edging locally, which was different from our usual ordering process with IB. It was not a real issue but involved details we had to work though.”

“All involved on this project are extremely humbled being awarded the Residential Project of the Year,” Codallos notes. “The time and attention to detail began with estimator Angel Blas, our amazing roofing technicians, foreman Juanito Lopez, and supervised by Jose Macias. With one of the best residential warranties available that we know of, we feel confident that our client’s amazing home will be well protected with their new IB Roofing System for years to come.”

“We are proud to award Premium Roof Services the Residential Project of the Year Award,” states Jason Stanley, IB Roof Systems CEO. “The beauty and installation of the new roof is amazing. We are proud of them for their ongoing commitment to using the highest performing roofing products, offering extremely strong warranties and providing overall service to their customers and community. They are the type of roofing company that we are proud to work with.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Premium Roof Services, Spring Valley, California, www.premiumroofservices.com

MATERIALS

PVC Roof System: 50-mil IB PVC, IB Roof Systems,  www.ibroof.com 

Cover Board: Securock, USG, www.usg.com

Clearing the Hurdles to an Attic Ventilation Upgrade

New ventilation products on this home were installed as part of a roof replacement completed by Ameritech Services, LLC, Deptford, New Jersey. Photo: Larry Deyo, Ameritech Services

The best time to evaluate and improve the residential attic ventilation system is during the installation of a new roof. Access and installation are generally easiest at that time, so a re-roofing application is an ideal time to fix existing problems and/or increase the airflow in an under-ventilated attic . But just because the roofing contractor determines the attic ventilation system needs a fix does not mean it happens.

We asked roofing contractors who have attended our best practices in residential attic ventilation seminars this question: What keeps you from upgrading the attic ventilation system during the installation of a new roof?Other than roof or house construction obstacles such as certain types of framing, incorrectly added house additions, or vaulted ceilings that are incorrectly insulated, here are the common hurdles — and suggestions to overcome them — from roofing professionals across North America.

HURDLE: “We’ve Never Had Ventilation, So Why Now?”

Many homeowners will challenge the roofing contractor who points out that the attic does not have enough ventilation — or any ventilation at all — if it’s been that way for a long time and there aren’t any noticeable problems. They reason that there’s nothing to fix.

“They typically say, ‘Well, it has been like this forever, why does it need to be changed now?’” says Clayton Putman, commercial project manager, Elite Roofing, Denver, Colorado.

Such comments are rooted in a reluctance to make an unnecessary purchase. “Customers do not want to pay for something they didn’t think they needed before and do not think they need now,” says Dale Johnson, project manager, HomeZone Improvements, Grand Blanc, Michigan.

Tips for Clearing this Hurdle: “I have trained our team to discuss the benefits of updating the attic ventilation system and count on them to present the information to the customer well,” says Putman. Here are some talking points to help overcome the hurdle of homeowners not wanting attic ventilation they previously never had or needed.

· Just because there are no obvious signs of trouble does not mean all is fine. Has anyone checked inside the attic to see the condition of the underside of the deck and the attic insulation? Any signs of mold or condensation buildup? Are there any signs of premature shingle failure?

· The house may be more airtight than in past years and will benefit from improved attic ventilation.Since buying this house have there been energy-efficiency upgrades such as new windows, doors, or insulation? If so, the house does not “breathe” as easily as it did previously. Tighter houses benefit from attic airflow to remove heat buildup in the warmer months, moisture buildup in the colder months and fight ice dams in snow climates.

· Your new roof will meet current standards. The full terms of the warranty that comes with your brand-new shingles is tied to proper attic ventilation. Current International Residential Building Code specifies the amount of attic ventilation needed and your attic does not meet those numbers. Even if the local municipality does not enforce building code, you’re knowingly paying for an inferior roof.

HURDLE: “You’re too Expensive.”

Good luck to the roofing contractor who is thorough, diligent yet considered too expensive compared to the other contractors who have submitted estimates to the homeowner. While price certainly should be evaluated, there is more to a roof estimate than just dollars.

“Very few contractors look at attic ventilation as an important factor in a new roof, so they do not include it in their estimate; and most of the contractors think there is a one-size-fits-all solution. As a result, their estimates are less expensive than mine,” says Matt Cooper, general manager, Redemption Roofing, Conroe, Texas.

Is less expensive better?

“Homeowners question my reasoning for additional attic ventilation since most other contractors do not mention the need. The homeowners almost feel as if I am trying to take advantage of them rather than make their roof ‘system’ a best practices/optimal operating one,” says Sabrina Johnson, president, KDCO Home Improvement Inc., Akron, Ohio.

Not understanding the overall project contributes to the price objections from homeowners. “Improperly educated customers make it challenging to upgrade the attic ventilation system,” says Greg Pike, project consultant, Campo Roofing, Twinsburg, Ohio.

If homeowners understood that all the exhaust vents in the world on their roof are useless without proper intake vents, perhaps price concerns would be reduced. “The main cause that prevents me from upgrading is the homeowner not wanting to pay for improved intake ventilation,” says Richard Turner, owner, R.J. Turner Remodeling, LLC., Winston Salem, North Carolina.

Tips for Clearing this Hurdle: “I will explain the importance of proper attic ventilation and provide documentation (brochures, website links, etc.) detailing why adding intake ventilation is critical,” says Turner. Here are some talking points to help overcome the hurdle of homeowners who believe the roof estimate is over-priced because the contractor included proper attic ventilation.

· Make sure we’re comparing apples to apples. A roofing estimate without intake and exhaust vents is not the same as a roofing estimate with a balanced system of attic ventilation. Those are two very different roofs that will deliver very different performances. I’m recommending a complete roofing system for longevity.

· Your new roof needs attic ventilation to perform properly. Anyone can install a roof covering. I’m installing a roof system that includes balanced attic ventilation to fight heat buildup in the summer, which will lighten the burden on your air conditioning system and improve the comfort in the living space. It will help fight the moisture buildup inside the attic from the 2 to 4 gallons of water vapor the average family of four generates indoors daily by occupying the house (cooking, cleaning, laundry, perspiration, breathing, etc.). And in snowy climates, attic ventilation helps keep the roof temperature fairly even so that ice dams are reduced.

· Our company has a great reputation. I’m not sure why the other contractors did not mention attic ventilation, but they should have. Our company always does because it’s needed for a properly installed roof. We’ve been in business here locally a long time and enjoy a solid reputation. We stand behind our projects which includes a comprehensive estimate for an entire roofing system.

HURDLE: “I’m Selling the House Soon.”

For the homeowner who is selling the house soon, spending money on the property for anything viewed as non-essential is a red flag. “People selling their home will not do anything they view as ‘extra’ like attic ventilation,” says Sue May, owner, A Better Way Construction and Roofing, LLC., Lincoln, Nebraska.

Tips for Clearing this Hurdle: Broaden the conversation to include the perspective of the potential buyer of the house. Here are some talking points to help overcome the hurdle of homeowners not interested in attic ventilation upgrades because they are selling the house.

· Your potential buyer will be looking very closely. I understand you’re selling the house and want to avoid any unnecessary spending. Someone will be buying your house and wants the best value for the money. If the potential buyer does not catch the lack of proper attic ventilation, the home inspector hired by the buyer likely will. You can avoid that possibility by addressing the attic ventilation deficiencies now. Otherwise, be prepared to negotiate with the potential buyers why your attic is incorrectly ventilated and how that will impact the selling price.

HURDLE: “Insurance Will Not Pay for It.”

A storm-damaged roof is being replaced and covered in price by the homeowner’s insurance policy but the cost to upgrade or improve the attic ventilation system is not. “If insurance will not pay for the upgrade, the homeowner will not either,” says Bryan Epley, former senior director of business development and sales, Gen 3 Roofing, Centennial, Colorado.

Tips for Clearing this Hurdle: Many roofing contractors will either arm homeowners with the needed information to get the insurance company to pay or will write a letter to the insurance company on the homeowners’ behalf. Here are some talking points to help overcome the insurance policy hurdle.

· Let’s change the insurance company’s mind. Let me get this right: Your insurance company is willing to pay the cost for a new roof — which is a significant purchase totaling thousands of dollars — but will not cover the cost of a needed attic ventilation upgrade, which is a small fraction of the cost of the total roof. We’re going to help the insurance company to reconsider. First, check your insurance policy for any “code upgrade” language. You’re about to get a new roof. If it’s not installed according to today’s building code standards, tell the insurance company. Second, the full terms of the warranty for your new roof are tied directly to proper, balanced attic ventilation. You don’t have proper attic ventilation. If we don’t upgrade your attic ventilation system, your insurance company will be paying for a new roof that has a reduced warranty. Third, the official representing organization of asphalt shingle manufacturers, ARMA, says point blank in its technical bulletin for residential roofing: the roof needs balanced attic ventilation. Let’s pass that along to the insurance company.

Willing to Walk Away

For many contractors, there is no insurmountable hurdle to upgrading the attic ventilation during a roofing project because they refuse to take the roofing project otherwise. For them, there’s no other option. It’s mandatory if the homeowner hires them. They are unwilling to put their company name on a roofing project knowingly done incorrectly. And if this requirement by contractors to upgrade the attic ventilation causes them to lose the project to other contractors, they’re fine with that.

“Our company will not do a roof without making sure it’s vented correctly,” says Jeffrey Heitzenrater, president operations, Triple Peaks Roofing and Construction, Inc., Olmsted Falls, Ohio.

“Nothing prevents me from upgrading,” says Sean Jegen, owner, Gorilla Exteriors Contracting LLC, Shawnee, Kansas. “I tell the homeowner these are mandatory improvements and if we don’t do them the shingle warranty is affected.”

“We always do it right or we don’t do it,” says Chris Arrington, vice president, Arrington Roofing, Dallas, Texas.

To the quality-conscious contractors in business for the long haul, doing it incorrectly just to make some profit is not worth the risks that could be lurking around the corner: callbacks and a damaged reputation.

“Contractors need to be smart and know when to walk away from a job to avoid getting wrapped up in a possible mold remediation or shingle failure claim,” says Jeff Barnett, Barnett Roofing and Siding, Inc., Canton, Michigan.

“We always upgrade,” says Sandra Daffer, owner, Hawaiian Built Roofing, Boise, Idaho. “It’s automatically in our bid if it’s needed. If the roof is a good one for ridge vent, then we go that route. Otherwise, we’ll pursue other venting options.”

“We will not upgrade to a ridge vent if the homeowner won’t upgrade an insufficient intake airflow system for balance,” says Corey Ballweg, owner, Mid Towne Construction, Inc., Cross Plains, Wisconsin.

“We check for proper attic ventilation on every roof replacement we do. We upgrade if needed, or we refuse to do the job,” says Trevor Atwell, owner, Atwell Exterior Services LLC, Greenville, North Carolina.

“We always upgrade the attic ventilation system,” says Patrick Readyhough, president, Pond Roofing Company, Inc., Fairfax, Virginia. “We include it as part of our whole roof system,”

Turn the Tables in Your Favor

Some contractors who take the hard stance of refusing to do the roof without upgrading the attic ventilation separate themselves from their competition in a positive way that actually leads to more business.

“Many times, we are hired because we make it a point to show the homeowner attic ventilation is needed,” says Heitzenrater. “All shingle manufacturers’ warranties that we deal with point out there is no warranty after a specified time unless there is proper attic ventilation.”

“After I teach the homeowner the importance of attic ventilation, nothing prevents me from upgrading the ventilation system,” says Ron Bastian, owner, Bastian Roofing, Richfield, Wisconsin. “Both in the summer and winter the homeowner clearly understands the benefits they will acquire by me doing their roofing project.”

About the author: Paul Scelsi is marketing communications manager at Air Vent Inc. and leader of its Attic Ventilation: Ask the Expert™ in-person seminars (www.airvent.com). He hosts the podcast “Airing it out with Air Vent” and is the chairman the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association Ventilation Task Force. He is the author of the book, Grab and Hold Their Attention: Creating and Delivering Presentations that Move Your Audience to Action.

New Roof Secures Child Development Center Against New England Winters

Photos: The Garland Company, Inc.

Snow, rain and precipitation are no strangers to Bangor, Maine, where the average annual snowfall is 66 inches. For Bangor Housing Authority’s Elsie C. Coffey Child Development Center, a secure roof means safety from the wear, tear and moisture of a New England winter and protection for children both in the building and out on the adjacent playground. As maintaining a deteriorating roof and constantly replacing shingles proved costly and ineffective, Director of Construction and Asset Management Bob Rhodes and Project Coordinator Shane Vanidestine decided it was time for a more permanent solution.

The roof required a revitalization. Goals for the project included choosing the best materials to secure the roof, which features multiple hips and valleys that would demand extra attention to detail and creative installation methods.

Because the facility is a child care center, special efforts also had to be made to protect the safety and comfort of students, parents and faculty. So, in addition to the creative and meticulous efforts in creating a stunning and effective roof design, there was even more emphasis on completing the project with minimal disruption to the daily routine of the center.

The Solution

To combat the leaks and cope with the difficult roof design, contracting company Elite Roofing and Restoration combined the forces of Garland’s R-Mer Span and S-5! SnoFence. R-Mer Span metal panels were retrofitted over the existing shingles to reduce waste and prevent any debris from falling onto the playground behind the daycare. This allowed the project to be completed without any disruption to the school’s hours or play time.

Rhodes and Vanidestine knew the metal roof system was their best option, as it would provide a long life span with minimal maintenance. “The products chosen are a cost-saver for the future,” says Rhodes. R-Mer Span ensures a sleek and watertight design for the roof and is tested to protect against the most extreme weather events. For complete protection, SnoFence bars were attached directly to the metal to retain snow and allow it to melt on its own without falling off in dangerous chunks, while R-Mer Span panels keep moisture and precipitation from leaking into the building.

The unique design of the roof called for greater detail in preparation and installation. The hips and valleys of the roof design required most panels to undergo two cuts. To strengthen the seams and combat the weight of ice and snow, R-Mer Span’s I-Span clips were utilized above the valleys. Despite being a slower process, this installation was a highlight among the customers. Rhodes spoke of the preparation preceding installation: “Architects dream of making a design such as this, and we were confident leaving this to Garland and the engineering staff, despite its difficulties. After this, all of our other projects will be a breeze.”

Rhodes and Vanidestine not only understood these products to be a cost-saver for the future, but also knew that R-Mer Span and SnoFence bars would drastically improve their maintenance efforts. Now, R-Mer Span panels will keep the roof strong and watertight, SnoFence bars will alleviate the looming threat of falling snow and ice, and the community will be able to focus on enjoying the positive aspects of New England winters. As an added bonus, the striking sea mist-colored R-Mer Span panels complement the unique architecture and design of the roof.

TEAM

Contractor: Elite Roofing & Restoration, Middlefield, Connecticut, www.eliterrllc.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: R-Mer Span, Garland, www.garlandco.com

Snow Retention: SnoFence, S5!, www.s-5.com

Butterfly Roof and Metal Wall Panels Highlight New Multipurpose Facility

Sevier County Utility District’s new multipurpose facility sports a butterfly roof over the main event space and two lower roof sections that cover offices, conference rooms and the kitchen. Each end of the building is open, with overhanging roofs, allowing for mountain views. Photo: Denise Retallack

The centerpiece of Sevier County Utility District’s new multipurpose facility in in Sevierville, Tennessee is a large event space that can be used by the district or rented to the public. The building also houses large conference rooms, a training room, a fitness area, administrative offices and a catering kitchen.

The design features large clerestory windows that flood the interior with natural light and a front canopy supported by steel columns. The facility’s exterior is dominated by its striking, V-shaped standing seam metal roof and metal wall panels, which are accented by brick and fiber cement siding.

“The roof was a major design element on this project from the beginning,” says A.J. Heidel, project manager for BarberMcMurry Architects in Knoxville, Tennessee. “We used the blue butterfly roof to accent the main assembly space and we used the lower roof as a wrapping element for the support spaces.”

To execute the design, it took a talented group of construction professionals including two Knoxville-based companies: Denark Construction, the general contractor on the project, and Baird and Wilson Sheetmetal Inc., the roof and wall system installer.

Crews from Baird and Wilson Sheetmetal installed approximately 13,500 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD Tite-Loc panels in Berkshire Blue on the roof. Photo: Denise Retallack

BarberMcMurry, Denark Construction, and Baird and Wilson had teamed up on other projects for the Sevier County Utility District (SCUD) in the past, so they were a perfect fit for this new construction project. The roof system chosen for the building is comprised of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD Tite-Loc panels in Berkshire Blue.

“We chose a standing seam metal roof because its material properties allow for a range of colors and ribbing patterns, and because of its ability to act as a wall cladding as well as roof,” notes Heidel. “We were able to give different characteristics to separate volumes by changing from blue smooth flat lock panels to Musket Gray ribbed panels while maintaining a similar method of installation.”

The design team originally explored using insulated metal panels for the roof and walls. “We were asked by Denark Construction to price this project,” says Jim Galbraith, vice president of Baird and Wilson. “I priced the insulated roof and wall panels and Denark came back asking if there were potential savings through value engineering. We submitted pricing for single-skin roof and wall panels and it was accepted.”

To make sure everyone was on the same page, pre-construction meetings involving the architect, general contractor and roof system installer included a mock-up of the panel system. “We had a mock wall with all of the roofing and wall conditions, and we met with them on site to go over all of the details,” explains Heidel.

The Installation

Baird and Wilson installed approximately 13,500 square feet of Tite-Loc roof panels on the roof, as well as 3,500 square feet of 16-inch Snap-Clad standing seam wall panels. “We also fabricated and installed gutter, downspouts, horizontal flush wall panels, low and high soffit, and fascia,” notes Galbraith.

After the metal deck topped with a nail base, insulation, and ice and water shield, the roof panels were installed and mechanically seamed. “The slope was less than 3:12, so the Tite-Loc panel was a perfect fit,” Galbraith says.

The exterior of the is features a mix of materials, including seamed metal wall panels, flush wall panels, fiber cement siding and brick accents. Photo: Matt Horton, hortonphotoinc.com

Work began on the butterfly roof. The valley features an internal gutter, which drains through downspouts that penetrate through the soffit and go down the front of the building, where they drain through underground pipes. “At the entrance we installed some horizontal blue flush panels that matched the roof,” notes Galbraith. “We also installed the fascia and soffit in Berkshire Blue, which matched the roofs on other buildings on the campus, which were also that color.”

The roof-to-wall transition was designed to make it appear the roof was wrapping around the building. “The roof panels were 16 inches on center, and the wall panels were 16 inches on center,” Galbraith explains. “The seams on the wall panels and the roof panels had to line up perfectly all the way down, so that was a bit tricky. You had to pay attention and do the math as you were going down to make it all work.”

Challenging Site

The limited area surrounding the building proved to be a major challenge on the project. “The building itself takes up much of the buildable area, leaving little room for things like parking and site drainage,” says Heidel. “We were able to avoid a water detention pond by using rain gardens on the site.”

The rain gardens are located against the main road, with parking spaces designed to shed water to that area, which includes native plants that thrive in a wet habitat. The pipes from the building’s downspouts flow there as well.

Tennessee’s spring weather was also a concern. “Construction took place in early spring, and the wind was whipping,” says Galbraith. “It was also rainy, and there was a corner where water would sit, so we had to be careful moving our lifts so they didn’t get stuck in the mud. The most difficult problem was manhandling the long roof panels. Many were more than 50 feet long.”

Photo: Matt Horton, hortonphotoinc.com

Despite the challenges, the project went smoothly. “BarberMcMurry prioritizes long-term client relationships, and this project is a great example of that,” Heidel says. “We have a history of successful projects with SCUD, and we continued that pattern through this project, which was delivered on time and on budget.”

“We work with our clients on designs that fit their brand, reflect their use, and are fully functional as well as beautiful,” Heidel continues. “That outlook is reflected in this project, too, through the overall design of the spaces and our creative use of materials. Finally, BMA is committed to sustainability and stewardship through design. In this project with SCUD, you can see sustainable design elements in the rain gardens, which filter and control the release of storm water as it leaves the site, and in the building’s clerestory windows and shaded curtain wall, which take advantage of daylighting.”

The project also showcases the quality workmanship of Baird and Wilson. Galbraith cited a quote from Charles R. Swindoll that serves as a company motto: “The difference between something good and something great is attention to detail.”

TEAM

Architect: BarberMcMurry Architects, Knoxville, Tennessee, www.bma1915.com

General Contractor: Denark Construction, Knoxville, Tennessee, www.denark.com

Roofing Contractor: Baird and Wilson Sheetmetal Inc., Knoxville, Tennessee, www.bairdandwilson.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: PAC-CLAD 24-gaugeTite-Loc panels in Berkshire Blue, Petersen, www.PAC-CLAD.com

Wall Panels: PAC-CLAD 24-gaugeSnap-Clad panels in Musket Gray