Recreation Center’s Innovative Roof and Wall Systems Provide Added Durability

Indian River County Intergenerational Recreation Center hosts recreational and competitive sporting events and other community activities. Photos: Borrelli + Partners

Indian River County Intergenerational Recreation Center was designed to be the hub of its community, a venue that hosts recreational and competitive sports and other activities, including educational, social and philanthropic events.

The new $10.4 million facility, branded by the county as the “iG Center” and often referred to as “Big Red,” consists of two adjoining main buildings: the two-story gymnasium and a long, single-story wing that houses various multi-purpose rooms, a concession area, a game room and a catering kitchen.

The site’s location near the oceanfront in Vero Beach, Florida, is susceptible to hurricanes and other extreme weather events, and making sure the complex would stand up to the elements was a key consideration for officials and residents in the county. This concern prompted a focus on the design of the building’s exterior envelope. In the end, a metal roof and metal wall panels were the key to meeting the building’s design goals.

Design Criteria

When county officials spoke with the architects at Borrelli + Partners, they had a strict set of criteria in mind for the building, including the ability to withstand high wind speeds and 100-year rainstorms. “They mandated a sloped roofing system,” notes Dan-Michael Trbovich of Borrelli + Partners. “They wanted a minimum 20-year warranty, and they said they were looking for a ‘50-year roof.’ This affected the roof design and the wall design.”

The new $10.4 million facility was designed to stand up to hurricanes, torrential rains and extreme fluctuations in temperature. Photos: Atlantic Roofing II of Vero Beach Inc.

A key goal of the team at Borrelli + Partners was to specify a watertight metal roof system that would also allow unlimited thermal movement to cope with extreme temperature fluctuations. They found what they were looking for in a standing seam metal roof and wall system manufactured by IMETCO.

The 37-acre site and open park setting also provided the opportunity to explore interesting aesthetic elements. The building would be highly visible, and goals included a dynamic exterior design that would allow the park and the building complement each other. In the end, the decision was made to go with bright red and white metal panels that would stand against the blue sky to create what Trbovich calls an “All-American design.”

In one of many daring design elements, sections of the red roof panels were folded over and brought down to the ground to serve as wall panels. A custom detail was devised to make the transition impervious to water penetration.

“Our criteria included a kneecap—a premanufactured fixture that would be put over the entire thing,” Trbovich says. “IMETCO was the only manufacturer we knew that offered that, and it was absolutely critical in the design.”

Areas in which the panels were turned over included the south-facing wall, which was no coincidence. “We wanted to make sure the south-facing wall didn’t get too much heat, so what you’re essentially doing is creating a vented roof decking system that protects the vertical surface on the south side,” notes Trbovich.

High summer temperatures and afternoon rains in Vero Beach can cause a lot of expansion and contraction, so HVAC and plumbing systems were rerouted to avoid the roof. “There is not a single roof penetration,” Trbovich says. “We wanted to make sure that roof would be able to move and slide. We wanted to make sure there were no contraction points that would hang it up, therefore we went with a design that would not allow roofing penetrations, whether it was a vent pipe, air duct or air-handling unit.”

Detailing was meticulous and consistent throughout, according to Trbovich. Flashing details were all designed to have a 6-inch overlap. “We went to extreme levels of detailing, whether it was in section cuts or in isometric cuts, to make sure that each and every one of those flashing details had that same 6-inch overlap. We required those be uniform across the facility on all corners, so that we essentially matched rake, eave jamb and corner flashing details.”

Installation Challenges

To ensure the details were correctly installed in the field, the architect and manufacturer worked closely during construction with the general contractor, KAST Construction, and the installer, Atlantic Roofing II of Vero Beach Inc.

The building’s exterior envelope features a metal roof system and metal wall panels manufactured by IMETCO. Photos: Borrelli + Partners

Atlantic Roofing IIapplied the standing seam roof system and metal wall panels, as well as a small single-ply roof on a flat section near the entryway. IMETCO Series 300 panels in Cardinal Red were installed on both the roof and walls, while white IMETCO Latitude panels were also installed on the walls.

The metal roof system was installed over the structure’s metal deck. It included 3 inches of polyiso insulation, 5/8-inch DensDeck and Aqua-Block 50 peel and stick, high-temperature underlayment.

The absence of penetrations simplified the metal roof installation, notes Steven Cottrell, project manager and chief estimator for Atlantic Roofing II. “The panels were rolled right on the site, and the longest ones up there are 168 feet long,” he says.

The roll former was stationed on the ground, and panels were lifted to the roof with a special cradle. “IMETCO brought out the metal and provided the machinery to roll them out, and the panels were placed onto giant spacer bars and loaded onto the roof,” Cottrell explains. “It was a bit of a challenge. We had 20 men up on the roof unloading them.”

The flat roof sections connecting the two buildings and the entryway were covered with a Seaman FiberTite KEE membrane, which was fully adhered over 3 inches of polyiso, tapered insulation and 5/8-inch DensDeck.

The roof system features a large internal gutter, which was lined with the same FiberTite roof system. Metal panels drop into the gutter and pick up on the other side, so it was crucial to ensure the area would be watertight and the panels would line up perfectly. “We worked closely with the architect and manufacturer on that,” notes Cottrell. “We used their eave detail and high eave detail, and it worked very well.”

Elegant Solutions

According to Cottrell, the roof and wall installations went smoothly and the roof is performing well — despite a hurricane and a 100-year rainstorm. “We’ve had no leaks, zero callbacks,” he says.

Photos: Borrelli + Partners

As the building was completed, Borrelli + Partners worked with the county to design the landscaping around the structure. “Our architects and interior designers work very closely with the landscape crew,” Trbovich notes. “We’re concerned about the physical space — external, internal, architectural and throughout. It’s a real holistic design approach, and you don’t see that with most architectural firms.”

The result is a project that Cottrell and Trbovich point to with pride. “It’s a unique structure,” says Cottrell. “It was a challenging project, but we rose to the challenge and banged it out. It’s like a little star for us on the fridge, if you know what I mean.”

For Trbovich, what stands out the most is the marriage of form and function in the many details. “While the building looks interesting with the awning and the striking form of the red standing seam roof, what’s crucially important is all the things we just talked about that are embedded in that design — the solutions themselves.”

TEAM

Architect: Borrelli + Partners, Orlando, Florida, www.borrelliarchitects.com
General Contractor: KAST Construction, West Palm Beach, Florida, www.kastbuild.com
Roof System and Wall System Installer: Atlantic Roofing II of Vero Beach Inc., Vero Beach, Florida, www.atlanticroofing2.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof Panels: Series 300 in Cardinal Red, IMETCO, www.imetco.com
Metal Wall Panels: Series 300 in Cardinal Red and Latitude in White, IMETCO
Underlayment: Aqua-Block 50, IMETCO
Cover Board: 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.densdeck.com
Single-Ply Membrane: 50-mil FiberTite XT KEE, Seaman Corporation, www.fibertite.com

Curved and Tapered Zinc Panels Highlight Canadian Subway Entrance Pavilion

The Vaughan Metropolitan Centre Subway Station is one of six new subway facilities near Toronto. Photos: Rheinzink

The new Vaughan Metropolitan Centre Subway Stationis truly an artistic jewel on Toronto Transit Commission’s (TTC) Spadina Subway Extension. One of six new facilities on the route, the station offers intermodal transit services and rapid subway connection to downtown Toronto.

The curvilinear design of the main entrance pavilion creates a futuristic appearance for the structure. The design offers a column-free interior environment with high ceilings and bright open spaces that allow daylight to penetrate deeply into the station.

Highlighting the exterior design is a standing seam roof that brings the structure to life. Approximately 12,000 square feet of Rheinzink Classic bright rolledpanels clad the curved roof of the impressive building. The roof offers high solar reflectance and combines with significant sustainable initiatives throughout the project. The station exceeds Canada’s National Energy Code requirements for energy performance by 40 percent and meets sustainability standards comparable to those required for LEED Silver certification.

Approximately 12,000 square feet of zinc panels clad the curved roof of the station, which exceeds Canada’s National Energy Code requirements for energy performance by 40 percent. Photos: Rheinzink

More than 1,000 uniquely tapered panels were fabricated by Rheinzink distributor Agway Metals Inc. at its facility in Exeter, Ontario. “No two panels are alike,” says Paul MacGregor, estimator. “Each panel had an individual taper and length. We fabricated the panels using our CNC turret, which was key to achieving the exact taper for each panel right down to the millimeter.”

Providing precise panel specifications to Agway Metals was the installer, Bothwell-Accurate, of Mississauga, Ontario. It was a demanding process, according to Trevor McGrath, Bothwell’s estimating manager for cladding. “We used a 3-D scanner on the roof structure and then utilized Radius TrackCorporation to design the curved framing system that went on top of the roof structure,” McGrath notes. “The Rheinzink panels were thenapplied on that. Radius Track confirmed the skin model of the 3-D structure for us and then computer-flattened it so that we could begin doing sheet design and layout. The flattened model gave us critical dimensions regarding panel lengths and widths.”

The panels were curved on site by Bothwell-Accurate using Agway’s Schlebach machine. “We did a sheet stagger at the beginning of the installation with the two panel lengths, which then allowed us to stagger all of the joints which is recommended,” McGrath says.

Bothwell-Accurate has considerable experience in installing zinc.“We’re very familiar with how to form and work with the natural metal,” McGrath states. “The architects wanted an ‘old school’ appearance with hammered seams and the manner in which the flashings and counter-flashings were done. There was a painstaking amount of detailing done around the 46 skylights in the roof. Each one required custom attention. We had productions crews on the job getting the panels down and then finishing crews crafting the detail work.”

The curvilinear design of the main entrance is capped with a standing seam roof comprised of zinc panels from Rheinzink. Photos: Rheinzink

Design for the station was a collaboration of Grimshaw Architectsand Adamson Associates Architectsin conjunction with ARUP Canada.

Goals of the Vaughan Metropolitan Centre included encouraging greater use of public transportation, facilitating efficient transfers between modes of transportation, as well as creating an interesting aesthetic experience. The domed entrance pavilion integrates a mirrored ceiling art installation by Paul Raff Studio designed tocapture the drama of moving passengers and changing light conditions.

Juan Porral, partner at Grimshaw Architects, summed it up this way: “We are always looking for opportunity to create high-quality places with real character. By elevating a functional building to something artful and full of life that people will remember and enjoy, we can have a greater impact on urban space and user experience.”

Composite Shake Is the Answer for Home in British Columbia

The Siebert residence was originally built in 1991. Its original cedar shake roof was replaced with a new roof system featuring composite shakes. Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Myrtle Siebert grew up in the logging industry as the granddaughter of a hand logger in British Columbia, Canada. She married a man who dreamt of having his own logging company and saw that dream come true. But when it came time to replace the cedar shake roof on her own home near Victoria, she decided to go with composite shake shingles because of their durability, fire resistance, and ease of maintenance.

Siebert and her son did their homework. They visited local builder supply businesses and then struck gold when they hiredVictoria-based Custom Roofing Inc.to do the job. Siebert worked closely with Caleb Friesen, owner of Custom Roofing, to make sure she got the roof system she wanted.

“Caleb and his team confirmed what we already knew … that composite shake from DaVinci was the product for my home,” says Siebert. “I chose the style and color of the composite shakes carefully so that the new fake cedar shakes would look like the real cedar roof we had previously. Mission accomplished.”

“She definitely wanted to maintain the look and feel of the thick wood shakes that the house had on it previously,” Friesen notes. “The idea of longevity and consistent appearance truly appealed to this homeowner. The selection of Bellaforté Shake in the Tahoe color blend really complements the design of this house.”

Photos: DaVinci Roofscapes

Made of pure virgin resin, UV and thermal stabilizers plus a highly-specialized fire retardant, Bellaforté products are created to resemble natural slate and shake products. The composite roofs are designed to resist fading, rotting, cracking and pests, plus high winds, hail and fire. The realistic-looking roofing tiles stand up to weather challenges while requiring no maintenance.

Siebert was intimately involved in the re-roofing process. “I had been directly involved in building this home back in 1991, plus several others over the years,” she says. “I love doing the planning and design work. Caleb was delightfully communicative and his team of workers was fabulous.”

Despite interruptions of pelting rain, snow obliterating the drawn lines and slippery conditions causing work stoppages, the team from Custom Roofing was careful and dedicated to the re-roofing process. “This roof gives me confidence,” Siebert says. “As much as I love wood, I no longer have to worry about maintaining a real cedar shake roof. The DaVinci composite shake is the best possible option I could find for staying as close to real wood on our roof.”

Prompt Response to Damage and a New Roof Help Restore Phoenix Library

The new roof atop the Burton Barr Library features a fully adhered Sarnafil PVC membrane. Photos: Star Roofing Inc.

At 6 p.m. on Saturday, July 15, a microburst over the roof of Burton Barr Library in Phoenix, Arizona, was strong enough to lift the membrane and the pavers meant to protect the structure during such extreme weather conditions. The structure, including the roof, is designed to remain mechanically stable and adapt as the stress on the building increases, but the severe wind event ultimately led to a broken sprinkler system.

The sprinkler system was installed under the roof system on the topside of the metal deck. Water rained down from the fifth floor and spread throughout the building. Upon initial evaluation, it was believed that approximately 50 percent of the building had water damage. At one point there were several inches of standing water on the first floor.

The structure and roof deck were determined to be sound. The immediate goals included temporarily protecting the roof area from any further rain, as the weatherproof membrane had been disturbed, and drying out the moisture inside the building.

Star Roofing Emergency Services was called by Brycon Construction Company, and a crew of Star roofers spent the weekend preforming roof repairs to get the roof in the dry and mitigate further interior damage.

Installing the New Roof

Star Roofing’s estimating and operations departments worked with Brycon Construction and the city of Phoenix to put together re-roof specification and budget pricing to install a new roof.

After it was damaged during a high-wind event, the existing roof system, including loose-laid membrane, insulation and interlocking pavers, was removed and recycled. Photos: Star Roofing Inc.

The existing roof system consisted of loose-laid EPDM over two layers of 4-inch polyiso insulation over a steel deck. Ballast consisted of 1 1/2-inch-thick interlocking pavers. Complete removal of the existing system was required. In all, 23 semi loads of insulation, 6 1/2 tons of membrane and 255 tons of concrete pavers were removed. Star Roofing recycled 100 percent of the pavers at Cemex USA in Phoenix, where the company grinds pavers and uses the material in making concrete. The EPDM and the roof insulation were also recycled through Nationwide Foam Recycling.

Access and the roof height provided challenges, especially in the roof removal process. The 34,000 pavers, each weighing 15 pounds, were placed in small trash bins. Pavers were removed 45 at a time, as this was the maximum weight per bin that Star’s crane could handle with the jib extended at the angle required to reach the building.

Safety is always the paramount concern, according to Jeff Klein, vice president of Star Roofing. “Challenges included exposed edges on the north and south roof deck and the removal of the ballast pavers with our crane due to the weight of the pavers themselves,” he notes. “To overcome these concerns, we limited the number of pavers removed at a time so as not to overstress the crane, and we made use of mobile fall protection carts and permanent safety tie-off davits.”

Additional work was required due to the replacement of the damaged sprinkler system. The sprinkler was installed above the roof deck and buried under the roofing system. Because of possible litigation, the sprinkler system piping had to be marked, disassembled and lowered to the ground. The system was then reassembled in the parking lot for inspection by the city of Phoenix and their consultants.

The new roof specified was a fully adhered Sarnafil PVC system. Crews from Star Roofing installed 5/8-inch DensDeck cover board, which was mechanically fastened with gray screws to match the underside of the exposed metal deck. Screws had to be kept in straight lines because of their visibility. A self-adhered vapor barrier was installed over the cover board. It was topped with one layer of 3-inch polyiso and two layers of 2 1/2-inch polyiso, all set in adhesive.

Photos: Star Roofing Inc.

A special installation method was required at the perimeter to protect against another high wind occurrence. Four layers of 5/8-inch DensDeck and two layers of 2 1/2-inch polyiso insulation, all secured with adhesive, were installed 18 feet in from of the roof edge.

The entire 43,000-square-foot roof area then received a Sarnafil 72 mil Fleeceback PVC membrane that was fully adhered. The system carries a 25-year warranty.

The project progressed smoothly, notes Klein. “That’s what we do every day — working collaboratively with many stakeholders to problem solve and design a system that meets the needs of the building, doing the job in a timely manner, and minimizing disturbance to daily business and other major construction underway.”

TEAM

General Contractor: Brycon Construction, Chandler, Arizona, www.brycon.com
Roofing Contractor: Star Roofing Inc., Phoenix, Arizona, http://starroofingaz.com

MATERIALS

Membrane: 72-mil Fleeceback PVC, Sika Sarnafil, https://usa.sarnafil.sika.com
Cover Board: DensDeck, Georgia-Pacific, www.densdeck.com

Insulated Metal Panels Lend New Rec Center Weather and Fire Performance

Photos: Metl-Span

The new Lander County Recreation Center, also known as “BM Rec” to area residents, provides a daily splash of energy and enthusiasm to the quiet mining community of Battle Mountain, Nevada. Featuring bold, ribbed insulated metal panels, single-skin rainscreen panels and a standing seam roofing system, the project showcases a comprehensive metal building envelope and the best in performance and aesthetics offered by NCI Building Systems Inc.

Designed by VanWoert Bigotti Architects, the Lander County Recreation Center strikes the perfect balance between industrial and commercial architecture. The project pairs a steel frame system by Star Building Systems with more than 50,000 square feet of metal panels by Metl-Span and MBCI.

Metl-Span insulated metal panels make up the bulk of the project’s high-performance metal exterior, providing thermal and moisture performance in a single, easy-to-install component. Designers blended 16,997 square feet of the ribbed 7.2 Insul-Rib profile with 4,595 square feet of lightly-corrugated CF Mesa panels for dramatic wall relief. Specified in both Charcoal Gray and Igloo White, the insulated metal panels provide exceptional aesthetic versatility.

While the 3-inch insulated metal panels boast an exceptional R-value of 23.58, the project team was equally impressed with the product’s unique, single-component construction. The ease of installation creates a weathertight building envelope after just one pass, creating efficiencies throughout the construction process.

Lander County Recreation Center showcases a comprehensive metal building envelope, with bold, ribbed insulated metal panels, single-skin rainscreen panels and a standing seam roof system. Photos: Metl-Span

The insulated metal panel system was installed without a hitch, according to Larry Rogers, owner of G&S Construction. As first-time Metl-Span IMP installers, Rogers and his team of builders underwent training at the nearby Metl-Span West manufacturing facility in Las Vegas.

“Everything went up smoothly,” Rogers says. “I’ve heard nothing but positive reactions from the architect and the building owners.”

Designers accented the ribbed insulated metal panels in Charcoal Gray with a custom green single-skin metal panel from MBCI that provides aesthetic harmony with interior design and signage elements. The bold green exterior also serves as the project’s aesthetic focal point, drawing attention to the street-facing entrance.

“The lime green panels really strike the eye,” notes Associate Project Manager Charlie Grundy, VanWoert Bigotti Architects. “We wanted to inject some personality and energy to the project, and I think it was a big success.”

The project also incorporates fire-rated insulated metal panels, featured solely on a storage facility on the eastern side of the building’s perimeter. While not part of the initial design, Lander County Recreation Center representatives requested additional storage space to meet the needs of its growing suite of programs and activities. Measuring approximately 600 square feet, the new addition “called for a firewall because of its proximity to a nearby school to meet codes,” Rogers said.

The team from VanWoert Bigotti did not hesitate to specify Metl-Span ThermalSafe panels. “The fire-rated panels were required at the common area between the Battle Mountain Junior High School gymnasium building and the storage building,” says Armando Velazquez, building service representative with Star Building Systems.

The building was crowned with a standing seam roof comprised of 22,853 square feet of 24-gauge CFR insulated metal standing seam roof panels. The roof panels are exposed on the interior. Photos: Metl-Span

ThermalSafe mineral wool panels combine exceptional fire-resistance with the thermal and moisture performance that can be expected from Metl-Span insulated metal panels. The product’s unique LockGuard interlocking side joint further enhances the fire-resistant performance of the panel with its tongue-and-groove engagement of the mineral wool core. The fire-rated panel also offers excellent structural characteristics and span capability.

The Lander County Recreation Center incorporates 972 square feet of 24-gauge, 4-inch ThermalSafe insulated metal panels with a Light Mesa profile and matching Charcoal Gray hue.

To complete the all-metal building envelope, VanWoert Bigotti Architects specified 22,853 square feet of 24-gauge CFR insulated metal standing seam roof panels. Featuring 2-inch standing seams with the lightly-corrugated Mesa profile, the CFR panels are exposed on the interior for smooth sightlines and a modern aesthetic appearance.

The product combines durable exterior and interior faces of Galvalume steel with Metl-Span’s unmatched polyurethane insulating core. Factory-cut panel ends and factory notching eliminate field work and erection costs, while weathertight vertical side seaming leads to additional installation efficiencies.

Battle Mountain residents celebrated the grand opening of the new Lander County Recreation Center with two days of free admission in July 2017.

TEAM

Architect: VanWoert Bigotti Architects, Reno, Nevada, www.vwbarchitects.com
General Contractor: Core Construction, Reno, Nevada, www.coreconstruction.com
IMP Installer: G&S Construction, Battle Mountain, Nevada,

MATERIALS

Insulated Metal Panels: Insul-Rib and CF Mesa panels, Metl-Span, www.metlspan.com
Roof Panels: 24-gauge Mesa CFR insulated metal standing seam roof panels, Metl-Span
Metal Accent Panels: Custom green metal panels, MBCI, www.mbci.com

Waterproofing Membrane Is Solvent Free

NOVALINK WMChem Link launches NOVALINK WM, a waterproofing membrane available in two- or five-gallon pails. NOVALINK WM is a cold-applied, single-component waterproofing membrane that cures by exposure to atmospheric and substrate moisture to form a continuous, tough, reinforced elastic seal. It is solvent-free and compliant with all known environmental and OSHA requirements, allowing its use in confined spaces with standard personal protection equipment.

For more information, visit www.chemlink.com.

Metal Panels Illuminate Institute for Contemporary Art at VCU

The exterior of the Institute for Contemporary Art features 28,000 square feet of zinc roof and wall panels. Photos: Rheinzink

The Institute for Contemporary Art (ICA) at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) will bring the most important, cutting-edge contemporary art exhibits in the world to the VCU campus and the city of Richmond. Located in the striking new Markel Center and designed by architect Steven Holl, the ICA offers 41,000 square feet of flexible space including a 33-foot-high central forum. The ICA features a dynamic slate of changing exhibitions, performances, files and interdisciplinary programs.

“We designed the ICA to be a flexible, forward-looking instrument that will both illuminate and serve as a catalyst for the transformative possibilities of contemporary art,” Steven Holl says. “The fluidity of the design allows for experimentation and will encourage new ways to display and present art that will capitalize on the ingenuity and creativity apparent throughout the VCU campus.”

In keeping with VCU’s master sustainability plan, the ICA incorporates state-of-the-art technologies and environmentally conscious design elements and makes use of numerous natural resources.

The exterior for the contemporary design features 28,000 square feet of Rheinzink roof and wall panels. According to Steven Holl Architects, “The prePATINA blue-grey Rheinzink exterior interfaces with clear and translucent glass walls and skylights that infuse the building with natural light and lessen reliance on nonrenewable energy. The zinc shares the same greenish-gray tonality as the matte glass, giving the building a shifting presence from monolithic opaque to multifarious translucent depending on the light.”

The Rheinzink panels were custom fabricated A. Zahner Company. They were installed by Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal. Photos: Rheinzink

The custom cassette panels were designed and fabricated by Rheinzink systems partner A. Zahner Company, Kansas City, Missouri, and installed by Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal, Wheeling, West Virginia.

The open joint metal panel rain screen system utilized 1.75-mm zinc. According to Zahner project manager John Owens, “The 1.75-mm zinc is a little heavier than normal but that’s what the architect wanted.” Zahner provided 1,200 total panels, of which 200 were curved. “We cut those panels radially as needed to fit the curved aluminum frame. All of that fabrication was done in our shop.”

Gary Davis, Zahner’s director of marketing, added, “We developed multiple panel systems using Rheinzink materials on a supply-only basis. To create museum-quality edges and detailing, Zahner digitally defined the scopes of work and fabricated from our 3-D model. Preceding construction tolerances were dealt with in a timely manner.”

TEAM

Architect: Steven Holl Architects, New York, www.stevenholl.com
Roofing Contractor: Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal, Wheeling, West Virginia, www.krsm.net
Metal Fabricator: A. Zahner Company, Kansas City, Missouri, www.azahner.com

MATERIALS

Zinc Roof and Wall Panels: 1.75-mm prePATINA zinc, Rheinzink, www.rheinzink.us

Working With Homeowners Associations Means Taking on Big Challenges

Glenwood Townhomes in San Dimas, California, includes 185 residential units, a clubhouse, standalone garage and park restroom building. The re-roofing project encompassed 250,000 square feet of shingles. Photos: La Rocque Better Roofs

A quick glance at the numbers reveals that Glenwood Townhomes in San Dimas, California, is not your everyday residential re-roofing project. Featuring 185 units plus a clubhouse, standalone garage and park restroom building, and requiring the installation of 250,000 square feet of shingles, the project is expansive in scope, to say the least. But for nearly 40 years, La Rocque Better Roofs has enjoyed taking on challenging roofing projects, and the team put a plan in place to take on a very ambitious and complex assignment.

With literally hundreds of homeowners impacted by the re-roofing project, the Glenwood Townhomes Home Owner Association (HOA) board of directors through its property management company, Personal Touch Property Management Company, actively sought a roofing company that had been in business for 20-plus years and, most importantly, was experienced in working with HOAs. Doug McCaulley, owner of Personal Touch Property Management Company, has managed Glenwood HOA for several years and knew he needed a company that was large enough and had the proper labor force to handle the size of the project — and would also be around to honor its warranty.

La Rocque Better Roofs has served customers throughout Southern California since 1981, and approximately 80 percent its business is focused on HOAs. The company has developed a process for effectively managing the multiple parties and considerations involved in HOA remodeling projects. Beyond the HOA board, other parties commonly involved in re-roofing projects include property management companies, roofing consultants, and maintenance and service organizations. From a project management perspective, challenges involved in HOA remodeling projects include dealing with any structural or code-related discoveries that arise once the project begins and minimizing inconvenience to residents.

The HOA board selected the Owens Corning TruDefinition Duration shingle in Desert Tan. Members desired both the aesthetics and the benefits of solar reflectivity. Photos: La Rocque Better Roofs

Labor availability is a key consideration for HOA projects, as such projects require a sizeable labor pool to be available for an extended period. Rory Davis, vice president of HOA Sales at La Rocque Better Roofs, says a readily available roofing team was a key factor in the selection of La Rocque Better Roofs for the project. “We do not subcontract our workers and work with a team of 75-110 people, depending upon the time of year, so that the project stays on schedule,” says Davis.

While project management skills, logistical know-how and labor are all required for HOA projects, the most important element in a re-roofing project is satisfying the homeowners living in the community. All these considerations went into La Rocque Better Roofs’ approach to the re-roofing of Glenwood Townhomes.

A Customized Approach to Roof Removal

The design of the Glenwood Townhomes community presented some structural challenges. Detached garages adjacent to each building blocked access for workers during the removal process. La Rocque Better Roofs found a way to resolve this challenge, investing in customized, extra-wide, sturdy walk boards to bridge the distance between the homes and garages. The walk boards allowed roofers to remove roofing from the home and then walk the removed materials directly into the truck. “Walking the debris right to the truck was a big plus, because materials didn’t touch the ground and didn’t come into contact with mature shrubs and landscaping,” says Guy La Rocque, president and CEO. “It was reassuring to homeowners to know that nails and debris wouldn’t be dropped in their yards and exterior living areas.” The system also supported efficiency. La Rocque estimates the walk boards reduced tear-off time by four to five hours per building.

“Safety and efficiency on all of worksites are key factors in being a successful and sought-after company,” La Rocque states. “The rules and requirements are constantly changing with OSHA, and it’s our responsibility as the management team at La Rocque Better Roofs to make sure all our employees are always up to date with the latest information. Our weekly Tailgate Safety Meetings as well as our monthly safety and education meetings help us maintain a level of awareness. It’s one thing to be educated in OSHA’s safety requirements; it’s another thing to implement and monitor these safety procedures on our jobsites.”

Surprises are not uncommon when remodeling mature properties. During the re-roofing project, some fireplaces in the community were found to be unstable. La Rocque Better Roofs worked with city permitting officials and engineers to retrofit the fireplaces so that they remained safe and functional without requiring a complete tear-down and rebuilding of the fireplaces.

Communication and the “Contractor Bubble”

Among the many steps La Rocque Better Roofs employed to simplify the process, Guy La Rocque says communication with residents was especially valuable. “We scheduled after-hours meetings with the residents to keep them informed about the project, answer their questions and let them know what to expect,” he says. “Over the years, we’ve found the best thing you can do is get homeowners involved. You can never communicate enough, so we let residents know what time our crews would be on site, where the crews would be working and what we expected to accomplish. “

Crews from La Rocque Better Roofs made sure to protect the landscaping as the project progressed. The company has made working for HOAs its primary focus. Photos: La Rocque Better Roofs

From La Rocque’s perspective, too many contractors operate in a “contractor bubble,” losing sight of other opportunities to add value to both homeowners and the contractor’s business. Listening to homeowners helps open up opportunities that may exist for additional work. “When you get homeowners involved, you get a different perception of what needs to happen,” La Rocque says. “The majority of us are homeowners, but many times we forget the most important thing we want from a contractor is communication.” He adds that the construction industry has suffered from a perception that too often contractors show up and leave whenever they want, leaving the customers in the dark. No one likes to be surprised. Keeping the homeowner informed can go a long way toward achieving more satisfied customers and generating more referrals.

Davis says that communication has never been more important than today, in the era of social media. “Yelp has become the new Better Business Bureau,” he says. “Social media provides more opportunities than ever before for consumers to either pat us on the back or criticize us.”

 Changing it Up

The Glenwood Townhomes community was built in 1973, and the roof replacement provided an opportunity to introduce trending colors and technology improvements to residents’ roofs. The HOA board wanted to select a color that would lighten up the overall look of the community and also take advantage of solar reflectivity. The HOA selected the Owens Corning TruDefinition Duration shingle in Desert Tan.

Asked about the shingle manufacturer’s involvement in the project, Davis says manufacturers’ reps can make a big difference. “Availability is key, and a willingness to bring samples onsite or address any problems that come up is critical. You learn a lot by how a manufacturer deals with any problems that arise. We may go years without a problem, but when something happens, we want someone who will step up,” he says. He also likes the Owens Corning Sure Nail technology and says the strip that ensures optimal placement of each nail is a plus.

HOA projects are not for every contractor. But through planning, establishing strong relationships with engineers, permitting organizations and other partners, thoughtful approaches to on-site challenges and most importantly, listening to customers, HOAs present an opportunity for contractors to take on projects of size and style.

Iconic Structure at Utah State Gets New Roof Over Summer Breaks

The roof on Utah State University’s iconic Old Main structure was replaced over the course of three summers by the team at KBR Roofing. Photos: Davinci Roofscapes

There was no summer break for the team at KBR Roofing these past three years. As soon as school ended in May for students at Utah State University, the team got to work on re-roofing the iconic Old Main structure on campus.

Originally built in 1889, Old Main has served its community for more than 125 years. Now listed on the National Register of Historic Sites, the imposing structure is home to the president of the university and a multitude of offices and classrooms.

“Every summer we tackled a different phase of the re-roofing project,” says Brent Wood, project manager at KBR Roofing. “This structure is so critical to the university that it made complete sense to invest in composite roofing. The old, curling gray wood shingles simply had to come off.”

Each summer, the crews from KBR Roofing focused on a different element of the project. “We encountered a few challenges along the way,” Wood notes. “First, since the structure was built so long ago, many of the walls were not square. Second, due to a fire on the north side in 1984, this section of the roof had to be re-sheeted. Third, we had to fabricate four new cupolas. And fourth, we had to custom create a pedestrian bridge 106 feet on top of the center to access the east tower.”

With all their challenges, Wood relates that the easiest part of the project was installing the DaVinci Roofscapes Fancy Shake tiles. “We used the regular shake on the roof surface and then the beaver tail and diamond tiles to accent different parts of the structure,” Wood says. “They were a dream to install.”

Passing Historical Review

Before installation began, representatives of Utah State University and Design West Architects sought permission to use the composite shake tiles on the Old Main project.

Originally built in 1889, Old Main is listed on the National Register of Historic Sites. The building houses the president of the university and a multitude of offices and classrooms. Photos: Davinci Roofscapes

“USU has an on-campus architectural review committee that monitors and approves all changes to buildings, signage and landscaping,” says Quin E. Whitaker, PE MBA, structural engineer/project manager at Utah State University. “Our Facilities team was required to meet with the State Historical Department of Utah to gain approval of the Fancy Shake shingles. When we met with the state’s representative, he declined all proposed roofing samples, including one from DaVinci. We asked him to go look at the DaVinci tiles installed on our Geology building back in 2012. As soon as we got there, he immediately told us the composite tiles looked great and met his expectations.”

Getting approval was critical, notes Whitaker. “Old Main is our flagship building,” he says. “It houses the president of the university, her staff and many other administration officials and classrooms. We didn’t wish to skimp on the quality of this roofing product. Gaining approval on the DaVinci product was especially important since we anticipate that five historic buildings on the campus quad (including Old Main) will all have the same composite roofing tiles installed in the coming years. The DaVinci product has an authentic look, backed by a strong warranty, which we appreciate.”

Going the Extra Mile

With the green light received, KBR Roofing started the Old Main roofing project in May of 2015. At the same time, the roof specialists from the university’s carpentry shop created new cupola bases.

“Bryan Bingham and Mike McBride at our university were intimately involved in the project,” says Whitaker. “I’ve never seen the level of craftsmanship that they were able to achieve for the cupola bases. Everyone involved in this project gave 110 percent.”

A cupola on the backside of the structure features beaver tail tiles. Photos: Davinci Roofscapes. Photos: Davinci Roofscapes

Going the extra mile involved quite a few special considerations for KBR Roofing on this project. The team manufactured a 15-foot pedestrian bridge to allow access from the roof to one of the towers. Located more than 100 feet in the air, the new bridge complements the building’s structure and meets code requirements.

On the north side of the building, workers crafted new metal sheeting on four finials. At the south tower, the stone finials were in need of renovation. The roofers contracted with Abstract Masonry to revitalize the stone, mortar joints and other surrounding brick features. They also contracted with Rocky Mountain Snow Guards for snow fences and snow guards that were installed around the entire structure. Drift II – two-pipe snow fences were put in place at the eaves over pedestrian and vehicular areas as a barrier to snow movement with RG 16 snow guards applied in a pattern above to hold the snow slab in place.

“Three of Old Main’s four towers now have a new DaVinci roof on them covered with the company’s attractive diamond shingles,” says Whitaker. “KBR Roofing was amazing. They also had to radius the railing for the two large rotundas. This company, in my estimation, is top notch and the only company that could have pulled off this project.”

TEAM

Architect: Design West Architects, Logan, Utah, www.designwestarchitects.com
Roofing Contractor: KBR Roofing, Ogden, Utah, www.kbrroofing.com

MATERIALS

Composite Shingles: Fancy Shake composite cedar tiles, DaVinci Roofscapes, www.davinciroofscapes.com
Snow Guards: Drift II and RG 16, Rocky Mountain Snow Guards, www.rockymountainsnowguards.com

Meticulous Preparation Sets Up Restoration Project for Success

Photos: Debby Amador, Roma Police Department

Officials at Roma High School in Roma, Texas, knew they needed a new roof. The tile roof on the main complex was more than 25 years old, and some components were clearly failing. They didn’t realize that many of the leaks and resulting wall deterioration were caused by other problems as well. Luckily, they reached out to design and construction professionals who did their homework, diagnosed all of the key problems, and developed a plan to fix them. The crowning touch of the building envelope restoration plan was a beautiful standing seam metal roof, and the success of the project is proof that hard work pays off not only in the classroom, but on top of it.

The Consultant

As its building envelope consultant, Roma Independent School District chose Amtech Solutions Inc., headquartered in Dallas, Texas. The full-service architectural, engineering, and building envelope consulting firm has been in business since 1982. Working out of the company’s Rio Grand Valley (RGV) office located in Pharr, Texas, Amtech Solutions inspected and evaluated the entire site and reviewed legacy documents to identify the underlying issues.

They found quite a few, notes Michael Hovar, AIA, RRO, LEED AP, a senior architect and the general manager of the company’s RGV office. “They thought all they had was a roofing problem,” he notes. “But we saw right away that not properly managing water off the roof was the cause of wall deterioration, which then became leaks into the building. Our experience with the entire envelope and all facets of design and construction really helped us on this one.”

Roma High School in Roma, Texas, underwent a three-phase building envelope restoration plan in 2016-2017. After the walls were repaired and restored, the roof and mechanical equipemt were replaced. Photos: Debby Amador, Roma Police Department

Amtech Solutions put together a presentation for the school board to detail what they discovered and the plan they proposed to remedy the situation. The company also worked with the school district to help develop a budget.
The restoration plan was split up into three phases. The first phase focused on restoring the walls and windows. The second phase encompassed roof replacement and installing new mechanical equipment. The third phase involved improving drainage, grading and other site repairs.

Amtech Solutions decided not to bid the project out to a general contractor, but rather to bid each phase separately. “We decided to split it up into stages and do it logically, starting with the walls first,” Hovar says. “For the walls, we got restoration contractors who specialize in wall restoration work.”

Restoration Services Inc. (RSI) of Houston, Texas handled the first phase in the summer, as the wall repairs would be louder and more disruptive to students. The roof replacement project was scheduled for the fall. “Once all of the stuff on the ground was done, that allowed us to do the re-roofing work throughout the school year, which also helped the price,” notes Hovar. “Our experience has always been that if we have good cooperation with the contractors and the school staff, at the end of the job they end up being best friends. And that’s exactly what happened. At the end of the job, they were sad to see the roofers go.”

Amtech Solutions convinced the school district the plan would work. “It took some coordination, communication and cooperation, and it took a motivated owner that was willing to do this and trust us,” Hovar says. “They looked to us for guidance, and we said, ‘We do this all the time. We do roofing projects throughout the year, occupied and unoccupied, and we do it in a way that respects what the occupant’s needs are.’”

When it came time to specify the roof system, school board members were divided; one faction wanted to install a new tile roof, and the other wanted to go with metal. “The interesting thing is, for the historical architecture of the area, both of those roofs are appropriate, so from the standpoint of historical significance, either one works,” Hovar says. “In the end, it was quite a bit more expensive to utilize tile than it was to utilize a metal roof.”

The Roof Systems

The decision was made to go with a standing seam metal roof from McElroy Metal on the vast majority of the complex, including the main roof, the gymnasium, and two freestanding structures — the art and industrial arts buildings — that had been added over the years. The main tile roof was removed and replaced with McElroy’s 138T Panel, a 16-inch-wide, 24-gauge panel in Brite Red. McElroy’s 238T Panel, a 24-inch-wide, 24-gauge panel, was specified for the gym, as well as the art and industrial arts buildings. In a cost-saving measure, the color on the gym roof was changes to Galvalume Plus. In all, more than 233,000 square feet of metal roofing was installed.

Before

“The reason we picked this roof system is we’ve had a lot of great experience with it,” Hovar says. “We love that panel because they can actually bring the roll former to the jobsite. That gives the roofing contractor a lot more options on how he can load the roof and sequence the job. The other beauty of this panel is that it has unlimited movement. The panels itself slides back and forth over a fixed clip. It also flashes like a dream.”

Low-slope roof areas adjacent to the gym were replaced with a two-ply modified bitumen system from Siplast. CPI Daylighting manufactured a new skylight for the atrium.

As part of the roofing phase, gutters and downspouts were added. “There was nothing controlling the water before on this project,” Hovar says. “We designed a gutter system with expansion joints as per SMACNA guidelines. The contractor made absolutely beautiful shop-welded aluminum downspout boots.”

The most crucial detail was a custom-made saddle that solved the problem of water infiltration at the transition between the roof and walls on the wings. “This ultimately simple solution addressed one of the major design flaws that plagued the facility from the first days of occupancy,” Hovar notes. “We modeled the three-dimensional design of those saddles, and the contractor welded them in his shop. He fabricated them out of .080 aluminum and they were seamless. The restoration contractor had already installed all of the through-wall flashing, so all the roofer had to do was put counterflashing in and do his work around it. He was able to fly without being slowed down by a mason on the job.”

The Roofing Contractor

The roofing phase of the project was handled by Rio Roofing, headquartered in Harlingen, Texas. The company primarily installs low-slope and metal roofs, and its focus is on large commercial and institutional projects. ““We do nearly 90 percent public bonded work,” notes Hedley Hichens, vice president of Rio Roofing. “We found out that whether it’s a small job or a big job, the paperwork is still the same, so we try to make it worthwhile.”

The company worked on the Roma High School project for about a year, wrapping up the roofing phase of the project in November 2017.

After the structure’s main roof was removed, the tile was replaced with a standing seam metal roof featuring McElroy’s 138T Panel in Brite Red. Photos: Debby Amador, Roma Police Department

The decision was made to tackle the wings on the main roof first. “During the pre-con meetings, we met with the principal and the superintendent and asked, ‘Which wings are the worst?’” Hichens notes. “There was one wing that was the most problematic, so we started with that area first.”

Rio Roofing began by tearing off the existing tile roof. “There were about 1,925 squares of concrete tile we had to remove,” Hichens notes. “We had crews on the roof tearing off tile, crews on the ground palletizing the tile and storing it in the parking lot.”

As crew members removed the old tile and felt, others followed behind and installed polyisocyanurate insulation and Polystick MTS, a waterproofing underlayment designed for high-temperature applications. “We did 40 or 50 squares a day, moving down the wing,” Hichens says. “We dried in the whole school. Then we came back with the 138 panel.”

On top of the gym and other buildings that received the 238T panel, the existing metal roofs were left in place. “We put flute fill on top of the old panels. Then we screwed down 3/8-inch Securock, primed it and put the Polyglass underlayment down on top of that,” Hichens explains. “That 24-inch panel is a great panel to work with because every time you put one down, you’re 2 feet closer to finishing.”

Installing the New Roofs

The school’s main roof covers a central hub with eight wings coming off of its octagonal skylight. Where the wings tie together, access was limited.

“It was a tight squeeze,” Hichens says. “Getting in there and getting out was difficult. I think our fork lift only cleared one of the walkways by 2 or 3 inches. It’s a big campus, but the layout was difficult at the school.”

Once the wings were dried in, sheet metal crews installed the edge metal and 4,000 linear feet of gutters. They also started forming the panels.

Typically, Rio Roofing lifts the roll former to the roof edge, but it was difficult to get a large lift next to the building, so in this case the roll former was left on the ground. It was moved from wing to wing as the job progressed. “We used a New Tech roll former on this project,” Hichens says, “We would put the roll former parallel to each wing and store the panels on the ground in each area.”

Panels were hemmed and notched using a Swenson Snap Table Pro and lifted to the roof with a fork lift and a special cradle. Crews used a hand seamer to set temporary seams and followed up with a robotic seamer from D.I. Roof Seamers. “The panels are easy to install,” Hichens says. “You get about four guys 10 feet apart to engage the panels and clips and you just keep going. At the end of the day crews put the seam caps on.”

On the low-slope areas, Rio Roofing installed approximately 47,000 square feet of the Siplast two-ply SBS modified system, which was torched down over new lightweight concrete. “For their size, the low-slope areas had a ton of mechanical equipment and ductwork up there,” notes Hichens. “There were a lot of key details.”

Rio Roofing custom-manufactured numerous curbs and details, including the saddles over problem areas at the walls. “We have a full welding shop,” Hichens notes. “We have a full machine shop. We make all of our own curbs here, so there is no lead time for ordering curbs, and we are sure they’ll fit.”

Teamwork

Work on the project has now moved on to a fourth phase: installing translucent panels over the swimming pool. Hovar believes teamwork was the key to the project’s success. “We had such a good contracting team, we did good field work to begin with, and we had an understanding owner,” he says. “Designing it wasn’t easy, but thankfully our experience helped. We just had a really good team to execute it, all the way around. That’s what makes for a great, project, right? When everybody is invested in a good outcome, they always support everybody else.”

Communication was also essential, and Building Information Modeling (BIM) helped keep everyone on the same page. “We modeled the project on our BIM software, and it helped everyone understand the scope and challenges. The BIM model allowed the owner see exactly what the project would look like, and it helped the contractor understand the staging and logistical challenges before the project was bid,” Hovar says. “There were no surprises.”

TEAM

Architect and Consultant: Amtech Solutions Inc., Pharr, Texas, www.amtechsls.com
Roofing Contractor: Rio Roofing, Harlingen Texas
Wall Restoration Contractor: RSI-Restoration Services Inc., Houston, Texas, www.rsi-restorationservices.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System
Metal Panels: 138T panel (16 inches wide, 24 gauge) and 238T Panel (24 inches wide, 24 gauge), McElroy Metal, www.mcelroymetal.com
Underlayment: Polystick MTS, Polyglass, www.polyglass.us
Cover Board: Securock, USG, www.usg.com
Skylight: CPI Daylighting, www.cpidaylighting.com

Low-Slope Roof System
Modified Bitumen Membrane: Paradiene SBS, Siplast, www.siplast.com