Never Stop Learning

This year as I watch my friends and family send their little ones off to school, I, too, am starting a new educational journey. I’m taking piano lessons. I’ve wanted to play since I was a child but never had the opportunity. My husband heard me talk about wanting to play a few times, so he suggested giving me lessons and a piano as a gift for our first wedding anniversary.

I literally thought about it for a full day. I was completely touched that my husband wanted to help me accomplish a lifelong dream. However, did I really want to commit myself to something completely out of the ordinary? I learned to play the trumpet in middle school and played through high school, so I can read music—treble clef. I’ve never had to learn bass clef or how to make my left hand and right hand play different music at the same time. Could I do it? What if I’m the worst adult student my teacher has ever had?

I came to the realization that the accomplishments of which I’m most proud pushed me out of my comfort zone. Plus, how could I possibly say no to my husband when his gesture was so sweet? I’ve had one lesson so far and the idea of being able to coordinate my hands still seems a little like being able to rub my stomach while patting my head. However, I’m excited about the future and am hoping I’ll be playing well by the holidays!

Every issue of Roofing has an educational bent, but this issue may push you out of your comfort zone. For example, cool roofs have been a hot topic for many years. Conventional wisdom states cool roofs are not appropriate for northern climates. Kurt Shickman, executive director of the Washington, D.C.-based Global Cool Cities Alliance, will challenge that notion in “Cool Roofing”. He presents new evidence from several scientific studies that demonstrate cool roofs provide benefits to buildings in Climate Zones 4 through 8.

Meanwhile, Thomas W. Hutchinson, AIA, FRCI, RRC, CSI, RRP, principal of Hutchinson Design Group Ltd., Barrington, Ill., and a member of Roofing’s editorial advisory board, shares his in-the-field experiences regularly. He notes in “From the Hutchinson Files” that code-mandated insulation thicknesses are forcing designers to take roof access door and clerestory sill details seriously. Hutch’s goal with his article is to give designers some confidence to create appropriate design and detailing solutions.

These articles may challenge what you’ve always done but they’re worth considering and discussing. In fact, I’d really like to hear what you think about them. In return, I’ll keep you updated on whether I’m becoming the next Chopin!

Coating Protects Homes from Fire

Sun FireDefense’s SPF 3000 Flame Resistant coating is a post-treatment, interior/exterior fire retardant via a silicone ceramic coating that provides insulation and reflects heat up to 3,000 degrees F.

Sun FireDefense’s SPF 3000 Flame Resistant coating is a post-treatment, interior/exterior fire retardant via a silicone ceramic coating that provides insulation and reflects heat up to 3,000 degrees F.

More than 50 percent of homes destroyed in wild fires aren’t in the direct path of the fire. Burning embers that float for miles and land on rooftops and find their way under eaves cause most homes to burn. Sun FireDefense’s SPF 3000 Flame Resistant coating is a post-treatment, interior/exterior fire retardant via a silicone ceramic coating that provides insulation and reflects heat up to 3,000 degrees F. The coating protects exterior and interior woods, such as maple, mahogany, cedar shake shingles, open-air roof decking and structural lumber. The clear spray lasts seven to 10 years and has a five-year warranty for exterior and seven-year warranty for interior wood applications.

Help Homeowners Understand the Quality Proposition of a Tile Roof

Buying a home is the largest purchase most people ever make. Buyers work intensely to identify their needs and wants, assess the individual benefits of various choices and evaluate the long-term financial return to ensure they make a quality decision. Once living in that new home, kitchen remodels and reroofing can be the largest expenses faced by homeowners.

 In addition to increasing curb appeal, modern tile roofing systems and accessories offer an opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of a home.

In addition to increasing curb appeal, modern tile roofing systems and accessories offer an opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of
a home.

We all have firsthand, daily experience with our kitchen. We know what we like and what we don’t. Advertisements showing features and benefits of new appliances, more spacious cabinets and better lighting are appealing. Learning and planning for a new kitchen is fun and exciting. We know we will use it every day and we can show it off to our friends. We choose to do a kitchen remodel.

Reroofing is different. The process usually starts with a surprise—a roof leak a repairman fails to resolve. Then a second attempt, maybe a third, followed by an explanation that the system has reached the end of its useful and serviceable life. Reroofing becomes necessary to preserve the integrity of the home. It’s not fun and it’s not by choice. Compared to new stainless-steel appliances, soft-close drawers and a built-in wine cooler, it’s not exciting.

With little understanding of modern roofing, the first (and often only) question asked is, “How much is it going to cost?” If lowest initial cost was the only criteria for a roof, we would all have blue tarps overhead.

The true cost of roofing is defined by the life-cycle cost, which includes consideration of the initial cost, life expectancy, potential energy savings and potential insurance discounts.

A quality tile roof installation will set a home apart from neighboring homes now and will be a great investment to help the home garner the best sale price later. This is where a knowledgeable contractor can help a homeowner identify his or her needs and wants, assess the benefits of various choices and calculate the value of the given system.

1. IDENTIFY THE HOMEOWNER’S NEEDS AND WANTS

Residential roofing is a functional part of the building envelope. Its primary purpose is to protect the home and its contents from the elements. Residential roofing is also a largely visible part of a home’s curb appeal. A tile roof will increase the curb appeal of a house when compared to similar homes with less substantial roofing materials.

Concrete and clay roof tiles’ resistance to weathering, hail, high winds and UV means that look of quality will be consistent from the day the roof is installed until the day it helps the homeowner get the best return on his/her original investment by enhancing the home’s curb appeal when the house is sold. Without the excitement of center islands and granite counter- tops, the homeowner needs help to be informed about options and benefits a tile roof can provide.

2. ASSESS THE BENEFITS OF VARIOUS CHOICES

In addition to increasing curb appeal, modern tile roofing systems and accessories offer an opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of a home. The inherent insulation properties created by tile’s high thermal mass can be enhanced with above-sheathing ventilation, or ASV. These raised batten systems can “… offer a significant 50 percent reduction in the heat penetrating the conditioned space compared to direct nailed roof systems that are in direct contact with the roof deck,” says Dr. William Miller, Ph.D., P.E., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn.

The energy savings of ASV is recognized by the California Energy Commission, Sacramento, and included in the Title 24 Energy Code revisions for reroofing and alterations. (Learn more about ASV in “Details”, March/April 2015 issue, page 79.)

PHOTOS: Boral Roofing Products

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An Oceanfront Elementary School Poses Tough Problems, but a Coated Aluminum Standing-seam Roof Passes the Test

Elementary school students sometimes find themselves staring out the window, but few have a view to rival that of the students at Sullivan’s Island Elementary School in Sullivan’s Island, S.C. The school is located on oceanfront property, and when it was time for the original building to be rebuilt, the site posed numerous challenges.

The standing-seam roof is made up of 0.040-inch coated aluminum panels that are 18-inches wide.

The standing-seam roof is made up of 0.040-inch coated aluminum panels that are 18-inches wide.

The original school had been built in the 1950s. It had been designed for 350 students and built on grade. The new school would have to be elevated to conform to modern building codes and service 500 students. The structure would not only have to withstand high winds, severe weather and a salt-air environment, but it also would have to fit into its surroundings. Many residents feared the larger building would look out of place in the cozy beach community. It was architect Jerry English’s job to figure out a way to make it work.

English is a principal at Cummings & McCrady Architects, Charleston, S.C., the architect of record on the project. He worked with a talented team of construction professionals, including Ricky Simmons, general manager of Keating Roofing & Sheet Metal Co. Inc. in Charleston, to refine his vision and bring it to life. English and Simmons shared their insight on the project, and they both point to the building’s metal roof as a key element in the project’s success.

CHALLENGING DESIGN

Cummings & McCrady Architects handles a broad range of commercial, institutional, religious and historic work—new construction and renovation. The firm had done a lot of work with the Charleston County School District over the years, including a small library addition for the original Sullivan’s Island Elementary School after Hurricane Hugo passed through in 1989, and it was awarded the new construction project.

The building’s foundation system had to meet strict regulations regarding resistance to storm surge. The building is elevated on concrete piers, which were topped with a 6-inch reinforced concrete slab. Metal framing was constructed above the slab. “With our building, we had to raise the underside of the structure almost 7 feet above the grade,” English recalls. “What we did is we built it a little bit higher than that so the underside could be left open and used for playground.”

For English, coming up with a design that would reflect the character of the local community was the biggest challenge. To achieve that goal, he broke up the building into four sections and spread them across the site with the tallest sections in the center. “We have four linked segments that transition down on each end to the height of the adjacent residences,” he says.

The roof was also designed to blend in with the neighboring homes, many of which feature metal roofs. “The idea of pitched roofs with overhangs became a strong unifying element,” English explains.

English checked with several major metal roofing manufacturers to determine which products could withstand the harsh oceanfront environment and wind-uplift requirements. “Virtually every one of them would only warranty aluminum roofing,” he says. “The wind requirement and the resistance to the salt air were what drove us to a coated aluminum roof.”

The majority of the panels were factory-made, but the manufacturer supplied the rollforming machine and the operator to handle the onsite rollforming of the largest panels.

The majority of the panels were factory-made, but Petersen Aluminum supplied the rollforming machine and the operator to handle the onsite rollforming of the largest panels.

The standing-seam roof is made up of 0.040-inch coated aluminum panels that are 18-inches wide. Metal trusses give the roof system its shape. English tapped the resources of roof consultant ADC in Charleston and the metal roofing manufacturer to iron out all the details. English wanted to avoid any cross seams in the metal roofing, so he worked with Dave Landis, the manufacturer’s architectural/technical sales manager, to arrange for the longest panels to be formed onsite.

The roof also includes two decks that serve as outdoor teaching areas. These sections were covered with a two-ply modified bitumen roof system and protected with a multi-colored elevated concrete paver system.

Another standout feature is the school’s entry tower, which is topped by a freestanding hip roof featuring curved panels. This roof was constructed with panels that were 12-inches wide. “We found other examples on the island where the base of the roof flares a little bit as a traditional element, and with the closer seamed panels they were able to get those curves,” English says. “It’s a refinement that’s a little different than the rest of the roof, but it’s the proper scale and the fine detailing pulls it together and sets if off from the main roof forms that are behind it.”

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

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CertainTeed Employees Roll Up Their Sleeves to Assist Homes for Our Troops

CertainTeed Corporation, along with employees from its Kansas City, Kansas, insulation plant and professional partners are rolling up their sleeves to assist Homes for Our Troops (HFOT). HFOT is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to building specially adapted, mortgage-free homes for severely injured Veterans. The latest team effort shows support and appreciation for a local Lee’s Summit, Missouri Veteran.
 
CertainTeed offers a portfolio of roofing, insulation, drywall, siding, housewrap and trim for builds across the U.S. CertainTeed’s involvement also extends to employees actively participating in HFOT local community events, as well as builder, distributor, and company contractor partners who assist with product delivery and installation.
 
Due to the proximity to the company’s insulation manufacturing facility in Kansas City, Kansas, local CertainTeed employees are able to do even more for Marine Sgt. Dustin Johns, taking action along with more than 150 people to assist with landscaping and other exterior beautification details during Volunteer Day. Several supporters, including long-time Kansas builder and HFOT partner Sallee Homes of Lee’s Summit, was on hand when the home was officially presented to the Johns family during the formal Key Ceremony.
 
A technician with the 2nd Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Company, Sgt. Johns was clearing an area of explosive hazards in Sangin Valley, Afghanistan on November 12, 2011 when he stepped on an improvised explosive device (IED). The blast resulted in the amputation of both legs and two fingers on his right hand.
 
He was fitted with prosthetics for both legs, but learning to walk again is only one challenge of day-to-day life. Sgt. Johns’ mortgage-free home provided by HFOT is specially designed to accommodate his needs and is a crucial step in helping his family rebuild their lives.
 
“When we heard about Homes for Our Troops building a home so near our largest insulation manufacturing facility, our staff, both at the corporate and local level, were excited at the chance to do more than usual for the local hero,” said Greg Silvestri, president of CertainTeed Insulation. “Everyone who has touched this project, from our builder, distributor and contractor partners to the employees at the plant to our company sales territory managers, have expressed their thankfulness for being able to step in, and eagerness to participate in another build when the opportunity presents itself.”
 
In conjunction with CertainTeed, Insulate America has participated in a number of builds since becoming involved with HFOT in the past few years.
 
“We do charitable work within the communities that we serve. Whether that’s a check, or with some hands on work. It’s rewarding when you come to the home that is being built for one of our Veterans to see the impact and the community coming together,” said David Beam, president of Insulate America. “It’s a small token of appreciation for their sacrifice and our freedom.”

This was the first time A+ Insulation, an Insulate America member contractor from Edwardsville, Kansas, provided installation services for a HFOT build.

“I really had no idea the lengths Homes for Our Troops goes through to personally customize each home to benefit the life of each deserving Veteran. It’s amazing,” said Mike O’Hara, president of A+ Insulation. “And CertainTeed Sales Territory Manager John Larkin was wonderful to work with, making it easy to complete the insulation installation on schedule.”
 
Since its founding in 2004, HFOT has built more than 220 mortgage-free, specially adapted energy-efficient homes for Veterans severely injured in combat after September 11, 2001. Each four-bedroom, two-bath home is Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant, complete with roll-in showers, roll-under cooktops and sinks, and other standard accessibility items. Construction of a home takes six to seven months, with the cost of each build averaging $430,000.
 
To learn more about CertainTeed’s Homes for Our Troops partnership, visit www.certainteed.com/followtheproject.

Vivint Solar Inc. and Renovate America Collaborate to Offer Rooftop Solar to More Homeowners

Vivint Solar Inc. and Renovate America are collaborating to expand access to rooftop solar for homeowners. By offering Renovate America’s HERO program as its PACE financing option, Vivint Solar is enabling more homeowners to purchase solar systems and lower their utility bills.

Under this business agreement, homeowners will be able to use HERO financing to purchase Vivint Solar systems and pay for them over time through their local property taxes. Payments are made at a fixed interest rate for terms of five to 20 years, and the interest on the payments may be tax deductible. Since it is expected that the system will stay with the home and provide utility savings into the future, any remaining balance on the assessment may be able to transfer to a new homeowner at the time of sale.

The announcement of this relationship comes at the same time as the Federal Housing Administration’s recently issued federal policy guidance that endorses PACE financing.

“We are excited to work together with Renovate America to provide this solar financing product that will make solar available to a range of consumers, including those who either do not have the upfront capital for a solar energy system or for whom traditional loans, Power Purchase Agreements or Solar System Lease Agreements are not viable options,” said Vivint Solar Executive Vice President of Capital Markets, Thomas Plagemann. “We are pleased with the new FHA guidelines that open the door to wider acceptance of the PACE financing product throughout the United States.”

Since its launch at the end of 2011, HERO, which stands for Home Energy Renovation Opportunity, has financed more than $1.5 billion of improvements such as solar, energy-saving roofing, windows, and doors, more efficient HVAC systems, and building insulation. About a quarter of the home energy improvement projects – around 19,000 – have been rooftop solar installations.

“More than 67,000 homeowners have invested in the efficiency of their homes,” said Greg Memo, executive vice president of business development and product strategy at Renovate America. “Vivint Solar and Renovate America are able to provide more families the ability to go solar and lower their utility bills.”

Vivint Solar is rolling out the HERO Program throughout California, and both companies are working with state and local governments to expand this product offering nationwide.

Polyiso Wall Insulation Product Line Meets New Model Energy Codes

EnergyShield CGF Pro, glass faced polyiso insulation for commercial exterior walls, helps protect the integrity of the continuous insulation layer.

EnergyShield CGF Pro, glass faced polyiso insulation for commercial exterior walls, helps protect the integrity of the continuous insulation layer.

EnergyShield CGF Pro and EnergyShield Ply Pro are the newest members of the Atlas Roofing Corporation’s commercial polyiso wall insulation line.

EnergyShield CGF Pro, glass faced polyiso insulation for commercial exterior walls, helps protect the integrity of the continuous insulation layer by resisting jobsite damage, particularly in masonry, brick veneer and metal panel assemblies. Additionally, the product offers more vapor permeability than foil-faced insulation, has multiple NFPA fire tested assemblies and is engineered for incorporation into commercial wall assemblies.

EnergyShield Ply Pro is a Class A polyiso wall insulation bonded to plywood for commercial continuous wall insulation systems. The single component provides insulation, together with a fire-treated plywood substrate that can be mechanically fastened to various cladding systems, resulting in fast installations and labor savings. EnergyShield Ply Pro offers the highest R-value per inch of any rigid insulation.

“One of our key priorities is to make Polyiso products easy for designers and installers to use in commercial applications,” said Tom Robertson, EnergyShield bsiness unit manager. “These products are intended to bring design flexibility, R-value and NFPA fire tested assemblies advantages of Polyiso to a wider audience.”

EnergyShield CGF Pro and Ply Pro are available for ordering though an Atlas representative. The EnergyShield line of high performance insulation provides continuous insulation boards for all design, code and efficiency requirements. EnergyShield products are designed and manufactured in eight locations throughout the US and Canada by Atlas Roofing Corporation.

Dow Plans to Construct Extruded Polystyrene Manufacturing Facility

The Dow Chemical Company announces its plans to construct a manufacturing facility to be located in Burley, Idaho. The facility will be operated by Dow Building Solution (DBS), a business unit within Dow, and produce STYROFOAM Brand Extruded Polystyrene (XPS) Insulation – a thermal insulation solution facilitating sustainability and innovation in the building and construction industry since its discovery in 1941.

Building upon its 75 years of innovation, the STYROFOAM Brand Extruded Polystyrene Insulation facility will come on-line utilizing DOW BLUEDGE Polymeric Flame Retardant Technology – an invention that is transforming the market as the industry standard flame retardant for use in polystyrene foam insulation, as it meets the demands of global energy efficiency regulations and sustainable building design.

The construction of the XPS facility exemplifies Dow’s commitment to the DBS growth strategy and strengthens its ability to deliver sustainable insulation solutions to customers, especially in Western Canada and the United States. The facility also demonstrates Dow’s pledge to provide operations performance in natural resource efficiency, environment, health, and safety, as outlined in Dow’s 2025 Sustainability goals.

“The construction of this facility will allow us to respond to market demand and deliver sustainable building solutions to our customers,” said Tim Lacey, global business director for Dow Building Solutions. “The collaboration with the city of Burley has been critical to reach this agreement and we look forward to continue collaborating together into the future.”

“Dow’s decision to build in Burley speaks about the quality of our workforce, the business- friendliness of our state and communities, and the great diversity that we are developing in Idaho’s economy,” Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter said. “It’s always great to welcome a corporate citizen to Idaho, and I’m excited about the opportunities for existing Idaho businesses to help meet the supply chain needs of this new enterprise.”

“We are thrilled to have a company such as Dow locating in Burley” said Director of Economic Development, Doug Manning. “They are a leader in business and innovation, and the immediate and future economic impact on this community will be exceptional. It’s a ‘win’ for the City of Burley to have a Fortune 50 Company locating here. This has been a collaborative effort from the State, the City, Burley Development Authority, Southern Idaho Economic Development Organization, and other local entities. We are excited to have Dow as a new community partner. They have been wonderful to work with to make this project happen,” he said.

Groundbreaking on the 60,000 square feet project is expected to occur in 2016 with project completion targeted for the latter portion of 2017. Manufacturing of STYROFOAM XPS Insulation is expected to begin in early 2018. Construction of the project will employ approximately 80 workers during peak construction and create 21 full-time manufacturing jobs at the height of operation.

BASF Offers Expandable Polystyrene With Polymeric Flame Retardant Material

As a commitment to the efficiency, sustainability, and safety of its customers, BASF only offers its expandable polystyrene (EPS) with the polymeric flame retardant (PolyFR). Neopor Graphite-enhanced Polystyrene (GPS) provides the insulation industry with a raw material that combines high insulation quality, safety, ease of processing, and low weight, resulting in a contribution to global climate protection goals.

“Our customers look to BASF to provide high-quality materials,” said Luis Espada, business manager, Neopor Insulation North America. “The change to PolyFR in our products is an example of the commitment to continually enhancing our product portfolio.”

PolyFR also improves the environmental profile of the material, as confirmed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Relevant first tests show the same results and classification as legacy FR products, such as ASTM E84, UL S701, NFPA 286, and NFPA 285.

“Switching to PolyFR guarantees the supply of eco-efficient thermal insulation products for sustainable building and construction in the future,” said Giorgio Greening, BASF global business unit, Styrenic Foams. “Energy efficiency in the commercial and residential construction section is now a bigger challenge than ever for the entire value chain. As a raw material manufacturer, we want to supply our customers with quality materials with optimal properties.”

Neopor is a registered trademark of BASF SE.

Complete Cool Roof System Extends the Service Life of New and Existing Roofs

Rhino Linings released a complete cool roof system engineered to improve building energy efficiency while extending the service life of new and existing roofs.

Rhino Linings released a complete cool roof system engineered to improve building energy efficiency while extending the service life of new and existing roofs.

Rhino Linings Corp., a manufacturer and distributor of spray-on protective linings, coatings and foam, released a complete cool roof system engineered to improve building energy efficiency while extending the service life of new and existing roofs.

The DuraTite spray polyurethane foam (SPF) roofing system holds a UL 790 Class A fire rating and is designed to provide a lightweight insulation system over various roof constructions and configurations. Unlike traditional roofing methods, DuraTite SPF roofing system offers a high R-value for superior thermal insulation, covers complex geometrical shapes and protrusions and applies directly to existing substrates in new and retrofit applications.

In addition to DuraTite SPF roofing system’s high-performance, it also offers significant life-cycle cost savings. An SPF roofing system is seamless and requires little-to-no maintenance. Roofing topcoats, like DuraTite acrylic, silicone, urethane and polyurea coatings may be reapplied numerous times, increasing the life of the roof.

The complete system combines spray foam with a full range of acrylic, silicone, urethane and polyurea coatings for a total roofing system that insulates, seals and protects. Products in this system include:

  • Acrylic Coatings — DuraTite 1065 and DuraTite 1070 single component, acrylic roof coatings demonstrate excellent adhesion to polyurethane foam, concrete, masonry, primed metal, primed wood and primed asphalt roofs. When applied at 12 DFT (dry film thickness) and fully cured, DuraTite 1065 and 1070 exhibit exceptional weatherability and resistance.
  • Silicone Coatings — DuraTite 1380 and DuraTite 1395 are high-solid, single-component, silicone coatings with low VOCs and excellent chemical and abrasion resistance. When applied, DuraTite 1380 and 1395 form a breathable membrane, making it an ideal choice for new and recoat applications over metals, single-ply membranes, masonry block, concrete and spray polyurethane foam roofing systems where moisture may be present.
  • Urethane Coatings — DuraTite 1175 and DuraTite 1285 are high-solid, single-component urethane coatings that can be applied in a wide range of ambient temperatures and humidity levels. Both offer superior impact and crack resistance. DuraTite 1285 also offers enhanced UV stability.
  • Polyurea Coatings — DuraTite 2185 is a fast set, rapid cure, 100 percent solids, plural component aluminized polyurea spray-applied lining offers enhanced UV stability and remains flexible in cold temperatures. DuraTite 2185 demonstrates exceptional adhesion to spray polyurethane foam, concrete, bitumen and asphaltic roofing felts, steel, wood and most substrates in extreme cold and warm climates.
  • Spray Polyurethane Foam — DuraTite CC 2.5, DuraTite 2.8 and DuraTite 3.0 closed-cell polyurethane foam products’ lightweight, seamless construction ensures leak-proof performance and allows for value engineering labor and material cost savings.

DuraTite SPF roofing system guide specifications and five-, 10-, 15- and 20-year warranties are available for use on roof substrates, such as metal, built-up roof membrane, single ply, wood recoat and concrete.