Seaman Corp. Redesigns Website

Seaman Corp., an innovator and manufacturer of high-performance industrial fabrics since 1949, announces the launch of its newly redesigned corporate website.

“This is part of a major endeavor to improve our engagement with our online audience,” reports Michelle Miller, Seaman Corp.’s marketing manager. “Today, buyers are making the majority of their buying decisions online. Before they ever even talk to a human being, they conduct online research and they poll their social networks for advice. It’s imperative that companies like Seaman Corp. have an excellent online presence.”

To accomplish this, the company partnered with SyncShow, a Cleveland-based digital marketing firm to develop the new site. SyncShow specializes in helping business-to-business clients improve their sales and lead generation strategies through digital marketing.

“We picked SyncShow as a partner because they demonstrated cutting edge digital marketing expertise and because they could prove to us how their efforts drive results for their clients,” reports Kim Seaman, who collaborated on the project as a marketing specialist for Seaman.

The new website is designed to be user friendly, and to attract and engage customers, vendors and potential new hires. But, the overall goal is grander. John Crum, Seaman’s president and COO, defined it. “Seaman Corp. makes excellent products. But when someone buys from us, they get a lot more than a great product,” he says. “They get our people, our culture and they get the knowledge we’ve gained from being in this business for more than 65 years. We wanted to capture all of this and bring it to life with this new site.”

Seaman also hired Frank Greiner, a digital video strategist, to help. Owner of HD Werks, a video production company based in Alliance, Ohio, Frank worked closely with Seaman’s marketing team to create 10 new videos for the site. Each short video showcases something unique about Seaman Corp.’s expertise, its approach to customer care, its products, its customers and the people who work there every day.

The companies will continue their partnership as they work to redevelop three additional sites that showcase Seaman Corp.’s main product lines, including FiberTite Roofing Systems, XR Geomembranes and Shelter-Rite fabrics for architecture. All sites are scheduled to launch yet this year.

Research Helps Industry Organizations Conclude Ballasted Roofs Provide Energy Savings

During the last decade, the roofing industry has been increasingly impacted by two strong forces: first, rising energy prices with no real end in sight, and, second, increasingly stringent building codes and regulations, designed to limit emissions, reduce energy use and mitigate the impact of urban heat islands.

The first definitive study to measure the energy-saving potential of ballasted roofs was done at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn., in 2007.

The first definitive study to measure the energy-saving potential of ballasted roofs was done at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn., in 2007. PHOTO: EPDM Roofing Association

The industry response has also been two-fold: In some instances, new products have been created, such as lower VOC adhesives, primers and sealants, self-adhering membranes and a wider variety of reflective membranes. At the same time, roofing professionals have taken a close look at some of the products that have been in use for a generation. Using rigorous science, they have tested these tried-and-true products to see how they measure up against the new standards. And in many cases, they’ve found that products that have been in use for decades are delivering great results in this new, energy-sensitive environment. Case in point: ballasted roofing, which has been available since the early 1970s, is turning out to be a great choice to meet 21st century needs.

2007 Study

The first definitive study to measure the energy-saving potential of ballasted roofs was done at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn., in 2007. Andre Desjarlais, ORNL’s group leader of Building Envelope Research, and his colleagues had just completed work in which “we had done a fairly substantial comparison of different cool roof technologies, both membrane types, as well as coatings,” Desjarlais says. At the request of EPDM manufacturers, working together at the newly founded EPDM Roofing Association (ERA), Bethesda, Md., as well as manufacturers within Waltham, Mass.-based SPRI, Desjarlais designed and implemented a second study to assess the performance of ballasted roofing. “We undertook a study to effectively expand what we had done earlier on coatings and membranes,” he says.

Other factors also encouraged ORNL to generate data about ballasted roofing. The California Energy Commission, Sacramento, had just revised its codes, essentially defining roofs with high reflectance and high emittance as the only choice of roofing membranes that would deliver high energy savings. Desjarlais believed this definition of a “cool roof” might be inaccurately limiting roofing choice by excluding other roofing materials, such as ballasted roofs, that would deliver comparable savings.

The California Energy Commission, Sacramento, had just revised its codes, essentially defining roofs with high reflectance and high emittance as the only choice of roofing membranes that would deliver high energy savings.

The California Energy Commission, Sacramento, had just revised its codes, essentially defining roofs with high reflectance and high emittance as the only choice of roofing membranes that would deliver high energy savings. PHOTO: EPDM Roofing Association

In addition, in Chicago, a new Chicago Energy Code was adopted as early as 2001 “with high reflectivity and emissivity requirements that limited severely building owners’ and managers’ roof system choices”, according to a paper presented in 2011 by Bill McHugh of the Chicago Roofing Contractors Association. At the roofing industry’s request, a reprieve was granted, giving the industry until 2009 to come up with products with a reflectivity of 0.25.

Faced with that 2009 deadline, the Chicagoland Roofing Council, Chicago Roofing Contractors Association and Rosemont, Ill.-based National Roofing Contractors Association began in 2001 to conduct research on products that would help to meet the city’s goal of creating a workable Urban Heat Island Effect Ordinance while giving building owners a wider choice of roofing products. As part of their effort, the industry coalition turned its attention to the energy-saving qualities of ballasted roofing and coordinated its work with the research at ORNL.

Desjarlais points out the concept of thermal mass having energy benefits has been accepted for years and has been a part of the early version of ASHRAE 90.1. “Thermally massive walls have a lower insulation requirement, so there was industry acceptance of the fact that using mass is a way of saving energy,” he says. “But we had a hard time translating that understanding from a wall to a roof. Whether you do that with a concrete block or a bunch of rocks doesn’t really matter. The metric is no different. Roofs or walls.”

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Create Cost-effective Modified Bitumen Roof Systems

Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc. has released several choices for creating modified bitumen roof systems that are cost-effective and contractor-friendly while delivering long-term performance.

Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc. has released several choices for creating modified bitumen roof systems that are cost-effective and contractor-friendly while delivering long-term performance.

Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc. has released several choices for creating modified bitumen roof systems that are cost-effective and contractor-friendly while delivering long-term performance. Its APP Torch Base membranes are designed as base or interply sheets in new construction, retrofit and flashing detail applications. Its APP Torch Cap Sheet membranes can be applied as a heat-welded cap sheet or flashing in new construction and retrofit projects and for repairing built-up roof systems. Its G2 Base roof system base sheets are designed for built-up and modified bitumen roof systems. The new products join the Mule-Hide Modified Bitumen roofing system suite of products, which also includes self-adhering membranes and accessories.

GAF Plans to Open PVC Manufacturing Line in Cedar City, Utah

GAF announced plans to open a PVC manufacturing line at its commercial roofing plant in Cedar City, Utah. The line, which GAF expects to become operational as early as mid-2016, will transform the Cedar City operation into a full-service manufacturer and supplier of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) single-ply membranes, as well as polyisocyanurate (ISO) insulation.

GAF also announced that it is actively considering locations for an additional plant in the eastern U.S. that will manufacture PVC, TPO and ISO. Known for its flexibility, ease of application and chemical resistance, PVC remains a single-ply solution among commercial roofing contractors.

“The Cedar City PVC line will strengthen GAF’s position as a full-service supplier of PVC, TPO and ISO. By manufacturing all three products at Cedar City and soon on the east coast, we will deliver economies of scale to our operations and quality service to our customers. This investment demonstrates our continued commitment to growth and leadership in the low-slope roofing market,” says Bob Tafaro, president and CEO of GAF.

“GAF is poised to leverage our track record of innovation and operational excellence. We’re ready to bring to the PVC market the same ingenuity and manufacturing expertise that have helped us to manufacture best-in-class TPO products.”

Modified Acrylic Latex Binders Are Designed for Restoration of TPO Roofing Membranes

Arkema Coating Resins, a business unit of Arkema, has added to its line of waterborne binders for use in formulating roof coatings.

Arkema Coating Resins, a business unit of Arkema, has added to its line of waterborne binders for use in formulating roof coatings.

Arkema Coating Resins, a business unit of Arkema, has added to its line of waterborne binders for use in formulating roof coatings. The new product is ENCOR Flex 192, a modified acrylic latex binder designed for coatings used in the restoration of low-slope, commercial thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) roofing membranes. Properly formulated, ENCOR Flex 192 offers outstanding dirt pickup resistance and adhesion to TPO, and can eliminate the need for a solvent primer to help lower roof maintenance and restoration costs.

The AC Cool Roof Binder systems are based on Kynar Aquatec PVDF binders, developed by Arkema’s fluoropolymer group, and ENCOR Flex polymers from Arkema Coating Resins.

Currently three systems are available, allowing greater formulation flexibility across different applications:

  • AC III Binder System – This system uses a Kynar Aquatec FMA-12 PVDF based topcoat and ENCOR Flex 187 all acrylic or ENCOR Flex 192 modified acrylic basecoat to provide the highest possible level of performance and durability. It is designed primarily for the most demanding cool roof coating applications.
  • AC II Binder System – Utilizing a proprietary ENCOR Flex 187 all acrylic polymer or ENCOR Flex 192 modified acrylic latex, this base and topcoat system delivers excellent performance and meets ASTM D-6083, “Standard Specification for Liquid Applied Acrylic Coating Used in Roofing.”
  • AC I Binder System – This ENCOR Flex 3186 styrene acrylic system provides a good mix of performance and value for less demanding applications.

Green Roof Provides Learning Opportunities at the University of Iowa’s Pappajohn Biomedical Discovery Building

Established just 59 days after Iowa became a state in 1847, the University of Iowa, Iowa City, boasts a number of firsts. In 1855, it became the first U.S. public university to admit men and women; at that time, its enrollment consisted of 124 students—41 of which were women. In 1873, it was the first school to grant a law degree to a woman. In 1895, it became the first university to place an African American on a varsity sports team.

As such, the university’s new Pappajohn Biomedical Discovery Building was designed and built with sustainability in mind. PHOTO: Roof Top Sedums LLC

The university’s new Pappajohn Biomedical Discovery Building was designed and built with sustainability in mind. PHOTO: Roof Top Sedums LLC


In more recent years, the university has strived to lead via its environmental efforts. As a Green Power Partner of the Washington, D.C.-based U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the university pledges to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation through the use of renewables. In 2010, it established its first sustainability plan—2020 Vision UIowa Sustainability Targets, which contains the following goals:

  • Become a Net-negative Energy Consumer
  • Green Our Energy Portfolio
  • Decrease Our Production of Waste
  • Reduce the Carbon Impact of Transportation
  • Increase Student Opportunities to Learn and Practice Principles of Sustainability
  • Support and Grow Interdisciplinary Research in Sustainability-focused and Related Areas
  • Develop Partnerships and Advance Collaborative Initiatives, both Academic and Operational

Among the University of Iowa’s strategies to achieve its sustainability goals is ensuring all new construction and major renovations on campus achieve a minimum LEED Silver certification from the U.S. Green Building Council, Washington.

The 200,000-square-foot, 6-story building, which officially opened in October 2014, boasts many environmentally friendly attributes.

The 200,000-square-foot, 6-story building, which officially opened in October 2014, boasts many environmentally friendly attributes. PHOTO: Scott Nagel


As such, the university’s new Pappajohn Biomedical Discovery Building was designed and built with sustainability in mind. The 200,000-square-foot, 6-story building, which officially opened in October 2014, boasts many environmentally friendly attributes, including glow-emitting sealants, paints, carpet and other materials; water-efficient landscaping; and recycled content and regional materials. It also achieves an-other university first: three green roofs, one of which provides students the opportunity to grow medicinal plants.

Opting for Trays

Des Moines, Iowa-based landscape architecture firm Confluence has been completing projects at the University of Iowa for many years through its Iowa offices—Des Moines and Cedar Rapids. Confluence was hired by the project’s architect of record, Rohrbach Associates PC Architects, Iowa City, to complete landscaping around and on top of the Pappajohn Biomedical Discovery Building in the form of three green roofs that total approximately 6,440 square feet. Despite the building’s consider-able roof area, the design team opted to install the green roofs on lower roof areas upon which building occupants would be looking. The rest of the roof cover is a reflective membrane system.

Confluence provided the layout for a modular green roof on the three distinctive roof areas. Patrick Alvord, PLA, RA, LEED AP, a principal in Confluence’s Cedar Rapids office, notes the chosen tray system was off-the-rack, which is what made it appealing to him and his colleagues. “We spent a lot of time talking to the manufacturer and they were just great to work with,” Alvord says. “We had a number of case studies of work they had done in the Chicagoland area that had proven very successful, so we had a very high level of comfort right out of the gate.”

Alvord opted to use the 6-inch-deep tray model because it would provide some flexibility in the plant materials that could be specified. “We were able to specify different plant materials in the plan of the roof to coordinate with shade, densities and location,” he says. “In areas where the roof would be highly visible from floors above, we did some patterning with the plants. In areas where we had the opportunity to go deep, we planted deeper-rooting plants that will grow taller and provide a denser plant palette.”

The plants are a mix of native and adaptive Iowa plants, as well as recommendations from the green-roof supplier. “It’s a mix of perennials, grasses and forbs, ranging from sedums to liatris to a number of different things,” Alvord notes.

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Product Series Allows Roofs to Be Customized

Johns Manville has debuted the DynaFast product series, developed from its first-generation ASTM D6164 DynaLastic platforms.

Johns Manville has debuted the DynaFast product series, developed from its first-generation ASTM D6164 DynaLastic platforms.


Johns Manville has debuted the DynaFast product series, developed from its first-generation ASTM D6164 DynaLastic platforms. DynaFast SBS modified bitumen membranes are designed to be mechanically fastened. Together, DynaFast 180 S, DynaFast 180 HW and the DynaFast250 HW provide a vast assortment of options to customize any commercial roofing job. The system requires fewer fasteners for the same wind-uplift rating as traditional system fastening and gives you the choice of fasteners. DynaFast may be used in high and low wind zones. There’s an application for every job, including hot, cold and heat-weld applications. Roll lengths of 1 square or 1 1/2 square with varied thicknesses mean faster installation.

TPO Membrane Features Enhanced Adhesive

GenFlex Roofing Systems has introduced an enhanced self-adhesive technology for its EZ TPO Peel & Stick membrane.

GenFlex Roofing Systems has introduced an enhanced self-adhesive technology for its EZ TPO Peel & Stick membrane.


GenFlex Roofing Systems has introduced an enhanced self-adhesive technology for its EZ TPO Peel & Stick membrane. The new adhesive formula offers twice the bonding strength and can be installed in temperatures as low as 20 F and as high as 120 F. The new adhesive also has no VOCs and is odor-free. Therefore, the membrane is safe for installers and building tenants, avoiding any delays or concerns when working in occupied buildings.

Metal Roofing Underlayments Protect Structures in Hawaii

The newly constructed Safeway Shopping Center, Honolulu, happens to be the largest Safeway on the Hawaiian Islands. It contains a parking garage below—in part, because of its location in a densely populated neighborhood.

The underlayment manufacturer worked on and approved a design in which the underlayment could be installed directly on the metal deck.

The underlayment manufacturer worked on and approved a design in which the underlayment could be installed directly on the metal deck.

ITS METAL ROOF WAS INSTALLED by Kapolei, Hawaii-based Beachside Roofing, which has been doing business in Hawaii for more than 25 years. The company, which installs all kinds of roofing and waterproofing systems, specializes in high-rise buildings, resorts and complex projects.

The 20,000-square-foot metal roof on the Safeway store had to meet strict color requirements in keeping with the Safeway brand. The color of the roof is Gargoyle, which is a greenish-brown.

The metal roofing was designed to be installed over corrugated 20-gauge steel decks. The underlayment manufacturer worked on and approved a design in which the underlayment could be installed directly on the metal deck.

The metal deck (HSB-36SS type) was installed with the wider corrugations facing up and parallel to the eaves (horizontally). The self-adhering underlayment also was installed horizontally, and the metal panels were then attached to the horizontal corrugations of the deck using panel clips and self-drilling fasteners penetrating through the underlayment into the flattop of the corrugations of the steel deck.

The self-adhering underlayment also was installed horizontally, and the metal panels were then attached to the horizontal corrugations of the deck using panel clips and self-drilling fasteners penetrating through the underlayment into the flattop of the corrugations of the steel deck.

The self-adhering underlayment also was installed horizontally, and the metal panels were then attached to the horizontal corrugations of the deck using panel clips and self-drilling fasteners penetrating through the underlayment into the flattop of the corrugations of the steel deck.

The walkability of the underlayment was an important factor, considering that the roof slope was 4 inches per 12 feet in some places. Also, the 120-day exposure allowance for the underlayment was reassuring, though not necessary for this project.

The metal roofing system included many architectural elements, such as canopies, penthouses and mansards. It covers not just the Safeway supermarket, but also other shops in the Safeway Shopping Center. The way the metal was used architecturally really dressed up the exterior of the project.

Secondary Water Barrier

A self-adhering metal roofing underlayment, like the one on the Safeway Shopping Center, perfectly complements metal roofing panels. The underlayment provides a watertight secondary membrane while the metal panels serve as the primary roof to protect against wind-blown objects and UV radiation. If the primary roof is damaged, the secondary roof acts as the water barrier.

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GAF Completes Extensive Roof Replacement Project at Corporate Headquarters

GAF has completed an extensive roof replacement project at its new corporate headquarters at 1 Campus Drive in Parsippany, N.J. GAF has been relocating to the new property, which has been completely renovated with quality products in all areas—including, of course, the roof.

GAF worked closely with its Master Select Contractors to ensure the installation of an energy-efficient roofing system at 1 Campus Drive. The system included GAF’s RUBEROID HW 25 Smooth Membrane, EnergyGuard Polyiso Insulation (for high insulation value), and EnergyGuard HD Cover Board (which offers a high R-value and impact resistance). It also included GAF’s single-ply membrane, EverGuard Extreme Fleece-back TPO Membrane. GAF is proud of how EverGuard Extreme Fleece-back TPO Membrane outperforms competitive TPO membranes (based on heat-aging tests), and backs it with a commercial roofing guarantee.

As GAF prepared to move into its corporate headquarters, it was imperative to make sure they had a durable, energy-efficient and easy-to-install roofing system. The combination of GAF EverGuard Extreme Fleece-back TPO Membrane in 2-Part Roofing Adhesive over EnergyGuard HD Cover Board and EnergyGuard Polyiso Insulation set in Olybond, along with RUBEROID HW 25 Smooth Membrane was the perfect system to keep its building dry and comfortable for years to come.

When using EverGuard Extreme Fleece-Back TPO Membrane with Low-Rise Foam Adhesive (compared to EverGuard Extreme Smooth TPO Membrane), the fleece on the back of the membrane provides an added cushioning layer, especially for hail-prone areas. Also, when combining EverGuard Extreme TPO Accessories with EverGuard Extreme Fleece-Back TPO Membrane, it helps save labor (versus field fabrication)—and provides an overall cleaner-looking roof.