Metal Roof and Wall Panels Capture the Spirit of Shakespearean Theater

The Otto M. Budig Theater is the home of the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. The new theater was designed by GBBN Architects in Cincinnati. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp

For many new arenas and theaters, the sheer size and scope of the project can pose the biggest hurdles. At the new Otto M. Budig Theater, home of the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, the problem was the reverse. The intimate theater was shoehorned into an existing space up against an adjacent building, so logistics were tight. But that didn’t mean the roof system couldn’t be striking. Designed by GBBN Architects in Cincinnati, the building’s exterior features daring angles and multi-colored metal roof and wall panels that combine to help capture the spirit of the Shakespearean theater.

Matt Gennett, senior project manager and vice president of Tecta America Zero Company in Cincinnati, oversaw the roofing portion of the new construction project in the Over the Rhine section of Cincinnati on the corner of Elm Street and 12th Street. “This building was plugged in downtown, and they fit everything in real tight,” he says.

Approximately 5,400 square feet of PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch, 24-gauge Corrugated Panels from Petersen Aluminum Corp. were installed on the metal roofs and walls. Tecta America Zero Company installed the metal roof systems, as well as a TPO roof manufactured by Carlisle SynTec over the main structure and mechanical well. Work began in January of 2017 and the roofing portion of the project was wrapped up in late August.

The Metal Roof System

The building features two different metal roof systems. The roof on the Elm Street side is comprised of three intersecting triangle-shaped sections in two colors, Champagne Metallic and Custom Metallic Bronze. “There were several unique angles on the roof,” Gennett explains. “On the top, there was a second metal roof, a shed roof that went down to the 12th Street side.”

The theater’s roof and walls feature approximately 5,400 square feet of PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch Corrugated Panels from Petersen Aluminum Corp. in two colors. The wall panels are perforated. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

The metal roof systems were installed over a 2-inch layer of polyisocyanurate insulation and a 2-1/2-inch nail base from Hunter Panels, H-Shield NB. The nail base is a composite panel with a closed-cell polyisocyanurate foam core, a fiber-reinforced facer on one side and, in this case, 7⁄16-inch oriented strand board (OSB) on the other. The nail base was topped with Carlisle WIP 300 HT waterproofing underlayment to dry in the roof.

Crews also installed two rows of snow guards on the metal roof using the S-5! CorruBracket. “The snow guard was a little different,” Gennett says. “It was specifically designed for a corrugated roof.”

The TPO Roof System

The main roof and mechanical well were covered with the TPO roof system, which totaled approximately 8,300 square feet. After Carlisle VapAir Seal725 TR self-adhering air and vapor barrier was applied to the metal deck, crews installed two layers of 2-inch iso. Tapered insulation was applied over the top to ensure proper drainage. The insulation was covered with a 1/2-inch sheetrock and the 60-mil TPO was fully adhered.

Two large smoke hatches manufactured by Bilco were installed over the stage area. The ACDSH smoke hatches measured 66 inches by 144 inches, and are designed for theaters, concert halls and other interior applications that require limiting noise intrusion.

The Installation

The initial focus was to get the roof dried in so work could progress inside the building. The jobsite conditions posed a few challenges. The structure abutted an existing building, and the space was tight. The schedule necessitated multiple trips to the site, which can be a budget-buster on a small project. “We had a lot of trips in and out to accommodate the schedule and get everything dried in so they could meet the interior schedule,” notes Gennett. “We were sort of on call. We made three or four trips out to roof this small project, so it took a lot of coordination because it was completed in pieces.”

Crews tackled the TPO roof sections first. The mechanical well section provided several challenges. Changes in the mechanical well layout necessitated moving some curbs and making adjustments to the tapered insulation. “They were trying to get lot of equipment into a small space,” Gennett explains. “We had to make sure we could get the water to the low spots and route it around all of that equipment. That was probably the biggest challenge on the project.”

Staging material was also problematic, as traffic was heavy and parking space was at a premium. Material was loaded by a crane, which had to be set up in the street. “It’s a postage stamp of a site,” says Gennett. “This is a main thoroughfare, and there is a school right across the street. We had to work around school hours, and we couldn’t be working when the busses were coming in. We usually came in after school started, around 8 a.m., to load materials.”

When it came time to load the metal panels, the cramped jobsite actually paid off. “It was very convenient,” Gennett recalls. “We were able to load the panels onto the adjacent roof and just hand them over. We had a nice staging area for cutting, so all in all it wasn’t bad.”

The corrugated panels were installed with matching edge metal. “It’s not a complicated panel to install, and they look really nice,” Gennett notes. “On the Elm Street side, to the right of the valley was one color, and to the left was another, so we had to match the color with our coping. There were some interesting transitions with our metal. We also had to really pay attention to how the siding was being installed so we could match the metal to the siding and follow the transitions from color to color.”

The perforated wall panels were installed by ProCLAD Inc. of Noblesville, Indiana. “Once the walls were done, we came in and did the transition metal,” Gennett says. “We just had to make sure everything lined up perfectly.”

Planning Ahead

Ensuring a safe jobsite was the top priority for Tecta America Zero and Messer Construction, the general contractor on the project. “Both Messer Construction and Tecta America take safety very seriously. That’s why we’re good partners,” Gennett says. “We had PPE, high-visibility clothing, hard hats, safety glasses for the whole project. All of the guys were required to have their OSHA 10. Anyone outside of the safety barriers had to be tied off 100 percent of the time.”

Planning ahead was the key to establishing the safety plan and meeting the schedule while ensuring a top-quality installation. “This job had a lot of in and out, which is tough in the roofing business,” Gennett says. “But we planned ahead, we made sure everything was ready for us when we mobilized, and we did a good job of coordinating with the other trades. It took a lot of meetings and discussions — just good project management.”

Gennett credits the successful installation to a great team effort between everyone involved, including the general contractor, the subcontractors, and the manufacturers. “We pride ourselves on our great, skilled crews and our great field project management,” he says. “Our superintendents are there every day checking the work and making sure the guys have everything they need. Messer Construction is great to work with, and obviously having the manufacturer involved the project and doing their inspections as well helps ensure the quality meets everyone’s standards and holds the warranty.”

The theater is now another exciting venue in the Over the Rhine neighborhood. “It is really cool spot,” Gennett says. “It’s an up-and-coming neighborhood that’s grown in leaps and bounds in the last seven years. There is a ton going on in Cincinnati. It’s just another part of the city that makes it really fun to go downtown.”


Architect: GBBN Architects, Cincinnati, Ohio,
General Contractor: Messer Construction, Cincinnati, Ohio,
Roofing Contractor: Tecta America Zero Company, Cincinnati, Ohio,
Wall Panel Installer: ProCLAD Inc., Noblesville, Indiana,


Metal Roof:
Roof Panels: PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch Corrugated Panels, Petersen Aluminum Corp.,
Wall Panels: PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch Corrugated Panels, Petersen Aluminum Corp.
Nail Base: H-Shield NB, Hunter Panels,
Snow Guards: CorruBracket, S-5!,
Waterproofing Underlayment: Carlisle WIP 300 HT, Carlisle SynTec,

TPO Roof:
Membrane: 60-mil grey TPO, Carlisle SynTec
Waterproofing Underlayment: Carlisle WIP 300 HT, Carlisle SynTec
Smoke Hatches: ACDSH Acoustical Smoke Hatch, The Bilco Co.,

Striking Asphalt Shingle Roof Tops the Restored Music Hall in Cincinnati

Originally designed by Samuel Hannaford in the 19th Century, the Music Hall first opened its doors in 1878. The Music Hall Revitalization Company coordinated the restoration of the 139-year old Cincinnati landmark, which just reopened to the public Oct. 6, 2017.
Photos: CertainTeed

The Cincinnati Music Hall is considered one of the largest and most beautiful concert halls and theaters in the world. It has played host to iconic performances and events for more than a century, from the 1880 Democratic National Convention to performances that helped shape the American arts scene.

A vision and product of 19th century architect Samuel Hannaford, Music Hall—as it’s known across the Queen City—first opened its doors to the public in 1878. Yet the doors on the 225,000-square-foot facility have been closed since May 2016 to allow for a complex interior and exterior restoration effort that would propel the aging building into the modern era while also preserving its beautifully unique characteristics.

The Charge

Restoring the beauty of Hannaford’s showpiece was more than a simple facelift. According to the Music Hall Revitalization Company, the nonprofit coordinating and leading the renovation, engineers investigating the building discovered structural deterioration beyond what one would expect in a 139-year old building, and recommended actions secure the Music Hall’s long-term viability.

The $135 million Music Hall renovation began in the spring of 2016, with the Cincinnati Center City Development Corporation (3CDC) overseeing construction. Following a rigorous request for proposals, 3CDC chose Imbus Roofing to install the new roof.

The Music Hall has been traditionally adorned with high-end shingles, and Grand Manor luxury asphalt shingles from CertainTeed were chosen to replicate the slate aesthetic and stand up to the elements. Photos: CertainTeed

Principal Daniel Imbus and his team were more than up to the task. Not only had Imbus Roofing performed the bulk of the roofing work at Music Hall over the past few decades, they have a rich legacy in the greater Cincinnati area. Among the other high-profile projects with connections to Imbus roofing are the Proctor & Gamble Twin Towers, the Walnut Hills Copper Dome, Paul Brown Stadium and the original Riverfront Stadium.

The team at Imbus worked closely with 3CDC, PWWG Architects and local distributor Midwest Roofing Supply to nail the aesthetic and capture the original essence of Music Hall.

“The roof replacement was a big part of the project, not only for protecting all the interiors that were being restored or replaced, but for the overall look of the building,” Imbus explains. “With the older building and the amount of other work being performed, just getting around the building and scheduling work around other trades such as painting, masonry, HVAC, etc., required a lot of planning.”

The Installation

Imbus partnered with Seth Dorn, branch manager at Midwest Roofing Supply, to find the appropriate materials to for the front towers, Corbett Tower, and Opera House portions of the roof. According to Dorn, the Music Hall has been traditionally adorned with high-end shingles, so they chose Grand Manor luxury asphalt shingles from CertainTeed to replicate the slate aesthetic and endure the wind, rain, snow and other elements typical to Cincinnati. To recreate the distinctive striped pattern of the roof, crews installed approximately 600 squares of Grand Manor shingles in two colors, Stonegate Gray and Brownstone.

The roof’s distinctive striped pattern was recreated with 600 squares of Grand Manor shingles in two colors, Stonegate Gray and Brownstone. Photos: CertainTeed

“We serviced Imbus Roofing with all potential materials for the project,” Dorn notes. “In addition to the shingles, we supplied DiamondDeck and WinterGuard underlayments from CertainTeed to further enforce weather protection.”

A large part of the roof replacement was the Main Hall, which sits above lower sections of the building and has a steep slope. To perform this installation, the Imbus Roofing team had to build scaffolding along the full gutter lines to provide safe and secure roof access and work platforms.

“With the steep slope of the roof, the shingles are an integral part of the exterior look of this historic building,” says Imbus. “It’s an introduction to the amazing interior renovation and exterior restoration.”

The Reopening

The project, more than seven years in the making, was completed on Oct. 1, 2017. The doors officially re-opened on Oct. 6 to kick off a weekend of events that included an opening night gala, a community Open House, and a pair of concerts featuring the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra.

“It looks awesome,” reflects Dorn. “We will spotlight this job for all of our contractors and customers.”

“We had a great experience with this project,” Imbus adds. “It was a quick schedule with a lot of work to a signature building of Cincinnati. It is great being a part of a successful project that I think will impress everyone in the community.”


Developer: Cincinnati Center City Development Corporation (3CDC), Cincinnati,
Architect: PWWG Architects, Pittsburgh,
Project Coordinator: Music Hall Revitalization Company, Cincinnati,
Construction Manager: Messer Construction, Cincinnati,
Roofing Contractor: Imbus Roofing, Wilder, Kentucky,
Local Distributor: Midwest Roofing Supply, Cincinnati,


Steep-Slope Roof System: Grand Manor luxury asphalt shingles, CertainTeed,
Underlayments: DiamondDeck and WinterGuard, CertainTeed