Petersen adds Technical Representatives in Canada for Metal Roof, Wall Systems

Petersen is expanding its network of manufacturer representatives into Canada to meet the country’s growing demand for metal roof and wall cladding systems. The manufacturer representatives from Enercorp will support architects, consultants, installing contractors and others involved in the specification and installation of exterior metal cladding products from coast-to-coast across Canada.

Enercorp (enercorp.ca) will represent Petersen’s PAC-CLAD architectural metal cladding products in Alberta, British Columbia, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec. The firm also represents products made by Carlisle Construction Materials, which owns Petersen. PAC-CLAD products will be shipped from its Elk Grove Village, Ill., facility.

“Partnering with Enercorp to represent Petersen is a significant step toward successfully servicing Canadian design and construction professionals who are looking for metal roof and wall products. The sales team at Enercorp will satisfy the architectural metal needs of Petersen’s existing and new customers in Canada as we grow the PAC-CLAD brand,” said Mike Petersen, president.

Petersen’s metal cladding products are used in Canada for a wide variety of projects, including commercial, educational, healthcare, residential and most other buildings to deliver a clean and elegant aesthetic. Petersen’s PAC-CLAD products include a high percentage of recycled material, which lowers their environmental footprint and supports sustainability, while being equally applicable for both new construction and restoration of existing building envelopes.

“One of Enercorp’s strengths is consulting architects on product specification, and Petersen is a spec-driven manufacturer, so this is a strongly aligned partnership,” said Dan Meskell, architectural representative at Enercorp. “Adding the PAC-CLAD product line to the Enercorp mix is a natural growth opportunity. We look forward to giving Canadian architects and construction professionals additional options for their exterior cladding needs with quality PAC-CLAD products.”

For more information, visit www.pac-clad.com.

Petersen Adds Reps to Meet Metal Cladding Demand in Northern California

Petersen continues to meet the growing demand in the Western United States for its PAC-CLAD metal roof and wall products by hiring new representatives in the region. The manufacturer representatives will support architects, installing contractors and others involved in the specification and installation of exterior metal cladding products in Northern California.

Building Enclosure Solutions, based in California and online at buildingenclosuresolutionsinc.com, will represent Petersen’s PAC-CLAD products in Northern California and Western Nevada (Reno/Sparks). Representatives include Jonah Cross and Mike Lampkin. Contact information is as follows:

Jonah Cross, jcross@buildingenclosuresolutionsinc.com, 408-210-1182

Mike Lampkin, mlampkin@buildingenclosuresolutionsinc.com, 415-423-7824

“Hiring Building Enclosure Solutions to represent Petersen is another way we’re addressing the growing demand for PAC-CLAD products in the Western United States. These professionals will satisfy the architectural metal needs of Petersen’s many existing and new customers in Northern California,” said David Hedrick, regional manager of Petersen’s Phoenix location. All representatives and distributors of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD products in the United States can be located with the locator tool

Petersen, a Carlisle company, manufactures PAC-CLAD architectural metal cladding products in multiple gauges of steel and aluminum. For more information, visit pac-clad.com

New Box Rib Wall Panels Expand Design Options

Petersen expands its family of PAC-CLAD Precision Series wall panels with the introduction of the Box Rib line. The four new Box Rib wall panels feature 87-degree rib angles and a variety of rib spacing patterns.

The Box Rib architectural wall panels are 1-3/8 inches deep with a nominal 12-inch width. According to the company, they deliver design flexibility while combining bold visual effects with easy, cost-effective installation. Each of the four Box Rib profiles is offered in a no-clip fastener-flange option, or a clip-fastened panel to accommodate thermal expansion and contraction.

Architects and designers can specify one of the four panel profiles or combine multiple Box Rib panels on the same surface to create custom patterns of ribs and valleys. According to the company, Petersen’s Box Rib panels are ideal for practically any structure that requires exterior wall cladding such as schools, hospitals, banks, sports facilities, office and industrial buildings, and most other nonresidential applications, but also residential buildings.

“Petersen continues to respond to architects who tell us they want more options for wall cladding by introducing the Box Rib line,” said Mike Petersen, president of Petersen. “As architects’ creativity evolves, our product line also evolves with the same high-quality manufacturing, technical support and testing that Petersen is known for.”

The Box Rib panels are part of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD Precision Series line of wall panels, which means they can be mixed with the seven Precision Series Highline wall cladding products to create a wide variety of custom patterns for a building’s exterior. The Box Rib panels are backed by the following tests: ASTM E-330, ASTM E-1592, ASTM E-283 and 331, AAMA 501.

Minimum Box Rib panel length is 4 feet; maximum lengths are 30 feet for steel, and 22 feet for aluminum on the no-clip fastener-flange version, with longer lengths available on clip panels. The Box Rib panels are available in 24 and 22-gauge steel, .032 and .040 aluminum in 46 standard PAC-CLAD colors, plus Galvalume Plus. BIM, CAD and related files are being posted on pac-clad.com as they become available.

Box Rib panels, as well as all Precision Series wall panels, can be installed horizontally or vertically. Additionally, Precision Series Box Rib, Highline and HWP panels can be specified as perforated, but only in aluminum for use in applications such as equipment screens, over graphics or for architectural flair.

Petersen, a Carlisle company, manufactures PAC-CLAD architectural metal cladding products in multiple gauges of steel and aluminum. PAC-CLAD products include standing seam roof panels, hidden- and exposed-fastener wall panels, flush- and reveal-joint panels, vented or solid soffit panels, perforated metal, coil and flat sheet, composite panels, column covers, plus fascia and coping.

For more information, visit pac-clad.com.

Shirley Ryan AbilityLab Features a Striking Standing Seam Metal Roof

The roof of Shirley Ryan AbilityLab incorporates striking V-shaped sections of standing seam metal panels and a tapered EPDM system. Photos: AJBROWNIMAGING.COM

The Shirley Ryan AbilityLab provides rehabilitation services to help patients recovering from severe conditions including traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, strokes, and cancer. The organization’s new 25,000-square-foot outpatient facility in Burr Ridge, Illinois, features a unique, uplifting roof design incorporating angled, V-shaped sections of standing seam metal roofing.

The low points in the center of each section and other low-slope areas are covered with an EPDM roof system. At the building’s perimeter, the roof and walls frame clerestory windows that allow natural light to flood the interior.

It took a talented team of construction professionals to execute the design conceived by architects in HDR Inc.’s Chicago branch. Willie Hedrick, Division Manager of All American Exterior Solutions, Lake Zurich, Illinois, notes that he and his team worked closely with the architect and the general contractor, Krusinski Construction of Oak Brook, Illinois, at each phase of the roof installation process.

“Initially the architect had specified a very nice but very expensive Terne-coated stainless steel panel,” notes Hedrick. “The project had budget issues, so we offered the Petersen prefinished steel panel as a value engineering option. The mechanically seamed Tite-Loc panel could handle the low-slope application and also came in a variety of colors. We also offered a 20-year watertight and finish warranty. For approval, we built a mockup for the architect and owner to review and also provided several references for completed projects around the Chicagoland area that they could visit to see finished examples of the proposed panel and color.”

Three different sections of the facility sport the Petersen’s V-shaped PAC-CLAD metal roof, with the wedges on each side sloping down to a valley in the center. Within the valley, the Carlisle SynTec EPDM roof system was installed over tapered insulation to ensure water would flow properly to the roof drains.

“The EPDM was an appropriate selection on the balance of the roof,” Hedrick says. “The workability of EPDM with tight, intricate details worked well throughout the project but especially within the gutter troughs between metal panel wedges.”

After the building’s metal deck was topped with half-inch DensDeck Prime and a self-adhered vapor barrier, crews from All American Exterior Solutions installed tapered polyisocyanurate insulation and 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime cover board. They then fully adhered 8,600 square feet of 60-mil EPDM.

All American then installed 21,500 square feet of 24-gauge steel PAC-CLAD Tite-Loc standing seam panels. The metal panels were installed over Carlisle WIP 300 HT underlayment, which topped 5/8-inch fire-rated plywood and 7 inches of polyisocyanurate insulation. Finishing touches included 3,800 square feet of Petersen .032 aluminum PAC 750 soffit panels and PAC 2000 prefinished Kynar column covers.

Installation Challenges

The weather was a concern, as the roof installation began in November and typical Midwest winter weather was looming. “The metal roof would be a time-consuming installation, so initially we focused on getting the building watertight for the GC by installing the EPDM roof and the metal roof underlayment, including insulation and plywood,” Hedrick explains. “The WIP 300HT allows for a 180-day exposure time to UV, so it gave us ample time to install the metal roof while ensuring watertightness in the space being finished below.”

Communication between all of the trades involved on the project helped ensure everything went smoothly. “There were trade coordination meetings with both the carpenter and the plumber,” Hedrick explains. “With the carpenter, we had to coordinate blocking heights to accommodate the tapered insulation. Also, due to the limited height to work within the gutter troughs and because the deck came down to a true V in the valley, we did an in-place mockup with the plumber to see how low the drain bowl could physically be set. Based on that elevation, we ordered custom EPS tapered edge panels to offset the V shape and provide a flat base to begin our tapered insulation system.”

Other details needed to be refined, including roof-to-wall transitions. “We worked with the GC and other trades to modify the detail for superior performance,” notes Hedrick.

Safety was always top of mind on the project. “Fall protection was the biggest safety concern,” Hedrick says. “We set up warning lines 6 feet from the edge creating a controlled access zone. Any work outside of the warning lines required workers to have 100 percent fall protection. All of the fascia and rake trim pieces were installed from an aerial lift.”

The installation was a complicated one, but All-American Exterior Solutions was up to the challenge. “We take pride in our ability to offer a range of products with a quality installation,” Hedrick says. “Our experience with multiple systems and manufacturers gives us the knowledge to be able to advise the design team on an appropriate product based on performance expectations balanced with budget.”

“Personally, I enjoyed the complexity and challenge that came with this project,” Hedrick concludes. “By no means is it a typical application; it required some critical and ‘outside the box’ thinking. I also enjoyed the collaborative nature a project like this requires. It was really a team approach between All American Exterior Solutions, the architects, the general contractor, and the other trades. The final product really shows that.”

TEAM

Architect: HDR Inc., Chicago, Illinois, www.hdrinc.com

General Contractor: Krusinski Construction Company, Oak Brook, Illinois, www.krusinski.com

Roofing Contractor: All American Exterior Solutions, Lake Zurich, Illinois, www.aaexs.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof: PAC-CLAD Tite-Loc Plus Panels, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

EPDM Roof: 60-mil EPDM, Carlisle SynTec, www.carlislesyntec.com

Underlayment: CCW WIP 300, Carlisle WIP Products, www.carlislewipproducts.com

Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Innovative Design Comes to Life at Innovation Amphitheater

Innovation Amphitheater features a curved standing seam roof above the outdoor stage and a roof with hips and ridges over the office and concession stand in a matching charcoal color. Photos: hortonphotoinc.com

Innovation Amphitheater is a 1,500-seat arena in Barrow County, Georgia. The striking curved, clamshell-style roof above the outdoor stage looks across the complex at the building that houses the ticket office and concession stand. Both are clad in matching charcoal-colored standing seam metal roof systems.

SACO Systems installed approximately 12,000 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD 24-gauge Tite-Loc Plus panels on the amphitheater roof and 10,000 square feet of the company’s Snap-Clad panels on the amenities building.

“The roof on the concession and restroom building was a 6:12 slope with hips and ridges,” notes John Salo, vice president of SACO Systems. “The stage roof was literally curved with the panels sloping from the front to the back and draining to the rear of the stage.”

Approximately 12,000 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD mechanically seamed Tite-Loc Plus panels were installed on the amphitheater roof

Founded in 1976, SACO Systems focuses on architectural metal cladding components for roofs and walls, as well as custom canopies and awnings. The company was called in on the Innovation Amphitheater project by Carroll Daniel Construction, the construction manager, and asked to provide pricing for the project.

Both roof systems were installed over metal decks and featured Atlas AC Foam II polyiso insulation and TAMKO TW Metal and Tile self-adhered, waterproofing underlayment. “Given the compounding slope of the stage roof, the mechanically seamed panels were an ideal choice for the project,” Salo states.

The Installation Process

After the metal decking was installed and inspected, crews from SACO Systems mobilized at the site. “We field measured for the PAC-CLAD panels and coil stock to fabricate the trims and flashings required for the project,” notes Salo. “We installed the insulation and underlayment to dry in the structure prior to panel delivery. We returned to the site a few days prior to panel delivery and began installing perimeter flashings that were fabricated in our facility in preparation for the panel installation.”

Executing the curved design of the amphitheater roof in the field would be the biggest challenge on the project. Salo contacted Dave Landis, Petersen’s sales and technical services manager for the Southeast. He’s often called in to consult on complex jobs and approves warranty applications.

The building housing the office and concession stand was topped with 10,000 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels.

Constructing a perfectly symmetrical curved roof is a difficult task, and in this case, the task was made even more difficult by the way the panels were oriented on the roof. “In this case, the panels ran parallel to the curve,” notes Landis. “Typically, they run perpendicular to the curve. Any time we deal with curved roofs on a building, there are always some imperfections in the structural decking and the structure of the building, and the roofer and the general contractor must give their best efforts to try and get it within reasonable plumbness so that we can get a roof cladding to lay down and look good.”

After walking the roof with the superintendent, Landis and the SACO Systems team developed an ingenious method of achieving the nice, smooth curve that was desired. “What we ended up doing was using two different types of clips to account for the imperfections in the deck,” Landis says. “We used flat clips that pull the panel flush to the deck, and we interspersed those with 3/8 space clips, which lift the panel up 3/8 of an inch off the deck. We used the clips to account for the more challenging areas where the curve wasn’t perfect. The clips made it work.”

Compared to the amphitheater roof, the other roof sections, including the small shed roofs off to the side of the theater, were pretty straightforward. “The roof on the amenities building was pretty cut and dried,” says Landis.

A detailed safety plan was essential, and crews used retractable roof anchors and personal fall arrest systems with double lanyards. “Fall protection is routinely our greatest concern on these projects,” says Salo.

Salo credits teamwork for the project’s successful execution. “This project was able to showcase what we consider one of our greatest assets: the relationships we have built with other companies like the construction manager and PAC-CLAD,” concludes Salo. “We were able to install a first-class roofing system that will perform for the owner for many years to come and at the same time find a solution to match the original design intent despite challenges along the way.”

TEAM

Architect: Lindsay Pope Brayfield & Associates, Lawrenceville, Georgia, www.lpbatlanta.com

Construction Manager: Carroll Daniel Construction, Gainesville, Georgia, www.carrolldaniel.com

Roofing Contractor: SACO Systems, Suwanee, Georgia, http://sacosystems.com

MATERIALS

Metal Panels: PAC-CLAD 24-gauge Tite-Loc Plus and Snap-Clad, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Underlayment: TW Metal and Tile, TAMKO, www.tamko.com

Insulation: Atlas AC Foam II, Atlas Roofing Corporation, www.atlasrwi.com

Petersen Adds Rep to Meet Demand for Metal Cladding in Hawaii, Guam

Petersen continues to meet the growing demand for its PAC-CLAD metal roof and wall products in the Western United States by hiring representation to service U.S. islands in the Pacific Ocean. The firm BEST Hawaii (Building Enclosure Specialist Team Hawaii) will support architects, installing contractors and others involved in the specification and installation of exterior metal cladding products on all Hawaiian islands and Guam.

Grant Henry from BEST Hawaii, based in Honolulu and Maui, will represent Petersen’s PAC-CLAD products. Grant Henry can be contacted by calling 808 870-4922, by sending email to ghenry@best-hawaii.com or by visiting best-hawaii.com.

“Petersen is growing to meet demand for its products west of the continental United States by hiring BEST Hawaii to serve our customers. We look forward to satisfying the architectural metal needs of Petersen’s many existing and new customers on those islands,” said David Hedrick, regional manager of Petersen’s Phoenix location.


Petersen, a Carlisle company, manufactures PAC-CLAD architectural metal cladding products in multiple gauges of steel and aluminum. PAC-CLAD products include standing seam roof panels, hidden- and exposed-fastener wall panels, flush- and reveal-joint panels, vented or solid soffit panels, perforated metal, coil and flat sheet, composite panels, column covers, plus fascia and coping. All are available in Kynar 70% PVDF finish in 45 standard colors that include a 30-year finish warranty. Most colors meet LEED and Energy Star requirements, and are rated by the Cool Roof Rating Council. Custom colors and weathertightness warranties are offered. Founded in 1965, Petersen’s facilities are located in Illinois, Georgia, Texas, Maryland, Arizona and Minnesota. 

For more information, visit pac-clad.com.

New Steel and Aluminum Standing Seam Roof Panel Offers Bi-Directional Installation

Petersen expands its line of PAC-CLAD standing seam roof products with the addition of the T-250 panel. Combining structural performance with architectural aesthetics, architects will enjoy the bolder profile of the T-250, installing contractors will appreciate the bi-directional installation capabilities and building owners will benefit from the panel’s impressive strength.

The strongest of all PAC-CLAD roof products, the T-250 panel is available in 16- and 18-inch widths in multiple gauges of steel and aluminum. T-250 features a nominal 2.65-inch seam height above the roof deck. It is available in all 45 standard PAC-CLAD colors, each of which carries a 30-year non-prorated finish warranty. A weathertightness warranty also is available.

“Our T-250 panel satisfies the needs of architects designing structures that include expansive roof areas requiring long panel runs” said Mike Petersen, president. “Plus, architects might also prefer the wider seam of the T-250 panel, which creates bold shadow lines. The T-250 panel follows Petersen’s drive to continue adding products that expand the creative palette of building designers.”

Standard panel condition for the T-250 is with striations, but smooth is an option. The T-250 is available in 24 and 22 gauge steel, and .032 and .040 gauge aluminum. The T-250 can be specified with a traditional intermittent fastening clip, or a continuous clip fastening system for high-performance open-framing scenarios where extra strength is required. Both clips allow for thermal expansion and contraction. Job-specific design calculations should be performed to determine the type of clip required.

The panel is bi-directional, which allows installers to position the first panel in the center of a roof and install simultaneously in both directions, making it easy to achieve an attractive symmetrical look, while allowing multiple crews to work at the same time.

Named for the shape created where two panels meet, the T-250 is a symmetrical panel whose seams form the letter T. A metal cap is placed over the T and a mechanical seamer bends each side of the cap under the top of the T to form a strong bond. The T-250 panel is equipped with the following tests: ASTM 283, 331, 1680, 1646, E1592 and E2140, plus FM 4474 as well as UL 580 and 1897.

PAC T-250 panels can be factory- or field-formed to length but must be field-seamed. The panels have been designed for application over a wide variety of substrates on roof slopes as low as 1/2:12. Sealant beads are factory-applied to the seam cover. The seam cover is roll formed in the factory.

Substrates may include 5/8-inch minimum plywood, nailboard insulation or equal with WIP 300 underlayment applied horizontally from eave to ridge. Other substrates may include metal decking, purlins or rigid insulation in conjunction with bearing plates, and open framing.

Maximum factory-produced panel length for the T-250 is 54 feet, but longer lengths are available through field forming. Seam covers will be limited to 30-foot maximum lengths and must be field-lapped.

For more information, visit pac-clad.com.

Marina’s New Roof Is Its Signature Design Element

When the former Morrow’s Marina first hit the Ridley Township, Pennsylvania, real estate market, it seemed like this last piece of the town’s open space might soon become a townhome development. But the township’s board of commissioners had a different idea for the tumble-down, 14-acre property, sited on Darby Creek, less than a mile from the entrance to the Delaware River. In addition to a new public recreation amenity, some on the board also saw a possible income opportunity too good for the township to pass up.

“I think, with good management, there could be a lot of revenue in the future,” says Bob Willert, who was then the board’s president, of the financial benefits the marina could offer.

Over the years, the town has made improvements to the marina, boosting its popularity with boaters. And, with the recent opening of a new $6 million restaurant, along with marina offices, right on the waterfront, that income potential is becoming a reality. Owned by the township and leased to a local restaurateur, the new Stinger’s Waterfront has quickly become a popular destination. It’s also easy to find, even without a GPS, thanks to a standout metal roof finished in an impossible-to-miss Copper Penny hue.

Choosing the Roof System

While the color is certainly eye-catching, it was the classic PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad profile that first caught the attention of Clarice Jones, project architect with Catania Engineering Associates, the restaurant’s Milmont Park, Pennsylvania-based design firm. She knew the standing seams on the 10,500 square feet of Snap-Clad roof panels — complemented by a matching 1,500 square feet of vented PAC-750 Soffit Panels — would emphasize the crisp lines of the building’s contemporary façade.

Crews from E.P. Donnelly installed 10,500 square feet of PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad roof panels in Copper Penny and 1,500 square feet of matching vented soffit panels. Photos: © hortonphotoinc.com

“The seaming is punched out — I saw a particular style,” she says. “I liked the way the seam looked in profile; it was a nice tight look.”

E.P. Donnelly Inc., of Warrington, Pennsylvania, installed the roof, and it was a complicated project. The sloped design is interrupted on both sides with three triangular window dormers, requiring complex detailing. And a multi-gabled cupola required similar attention, though at a smaller scale. Donnelly’s project manager, Gerry Campi, suggested Petersen’s PAC-CLAD product to the general contractor — J.S. McManus Inc. of Chester Heights, Pennsylvania — as a better fit for this demanding project.

“I told the GC that Petersen was a much better product, and the GC made the switch,” Campi says. “We use the Snap-Clad profile regularly. It snaps together the best. It’s a really nice product.”

For Jones, metal was the only roofing option that would work; any other option would have looked too residential. But, interestingly, the bright metallic finish wasn’t her first choice. Initially, her plans had called for a more neutral gray, but the town’s business manager opted for the definitely-not-neutral Copper Penny shade. “They wanted something bolder,” Jones says. “It’s like a flame; I’m glad they chose it. It sparkles like a diamond.”

Building a Landmark

The roof design features a multi-gabled cupola as well as triangular window dormers.

After winning the project, J.S. McManus Inc. needed to complete the building construction on a tight schedule. Michael McManus, vice president of J.S. McManus, coordinated the work of subcontractors and worked closely with the architect, owner, restaurant owner, and the other prime contractors. “I had my superintendent, Tim O’Connell, who was on site to handle the day-to-day operations,” McManus notes. “We kept our focus on getting the steel superstructure completed as soon as possible so that we could get the roof installed. As with all projects, once the roof is installed, then you can really expedite the project since you don’t have to worry about being impacted by the weather. It took a lot of hard work from my team, and we all stayed focused and worked diligently to complete the project on time.”

As soon as they could, crews from E.P. Donnelly tackled the challenging installation. Crew members were tied off 100 percent of the time to ensure safety. The architectural features called for extra care during detailing to ensure smooth lines, and crews worked carefully to make sure that all areas were fully sealed and waterproofed.

Snow Retention System

Despite Ridley Marina being located in snow country, no snow retention had been specified for the project. “We actually brought this up to the owner and architect that no snow guards were specified for the metal roof, which would create a serious safety concern,”says Campi.E.P. Donnelly recommended installing the S-5! ColorGard system, citing it as the only system the company installs.

A ColorGard engineered snow guard system was added at the recommendation of the roofing contractor on the project.

Sourcing the snow guard system was an easy decision because Campi had worked with a specific distributor since 2013. Brock and Associates Metal Resources, based in Pittsburgh, fulfilled the necessary bill of materials. Brock is a manufacturer and distributor of exterior metal cladding systems for commercial and industrial applications.

The project called for thirty 8-foot sections of unpunched ColorGard rail. To attach the rail, 290 S-5-S Clamps were employed. Then, 290 Sno-Clips II and 290 VersaClips were installed to complete the engineered snow guard system atop the marina’s new copper penny roof. Of course, ensuring aesthetics remained an important design goal, and matching the roof color was crucial. The product allows color-matched strips of the roof metal to be inserted into the ColorGard sections, providing the necessary holding strength while still maintaining a streamlined appearance.

Since its completion, the Ridley Township Marina project has become a stunning showpiece for the area, and all involved with the project point to the roof as its most stunning architectural feature. Campi notes that the roof has become a billboard, of sorts, for the marina, visible from a nearby interstate highway. “When you’re coming down I-95 through Philly, that Copper Penny roof really stands out,” he says.

TEAM

Architect: Catania Engineering Associates, Milmont Park, Pennsylvania, www.cataniaengineering.com

General Contractor: J.S. McManus Inc., Chester Heights, Pennsylvania, www.jsmcmanus.com

Roofing Contractor: E.P. Donnelly Inc., Warrington, Pennsylvania

Distributor: Brock and Associates Metal Resources, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, www.brock-assoc.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad Panels, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Soffit Panels: PAC-CLAD PAC-750 Soffit Panels, Petersen

Snow Retention System: ColorGard, S-5!, www.s-5.com

Metal Panels Create High-Tech Appearance for Energy-Positive School

Myrtle Beach Middle School is engineered to be net-energy positive, and the building’s façade was developed to reflect its high-tech performance goals. Photos: hortonphotoinc.com

The new Myrtle Beach Middle School in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, offers a vision of the future, in both its eye-catching design and award-winning performance. The school, like four other new elementary and middle schools opened in less than two years by the Horry County School District (HCSD), is engineered to be net-energy positive. This means the schools were designed to generate more energy than they use over the course of the year.

Designers mirrored that top-tier energy performance in their plans for a dynamic façade, punctuated by sharp corner angles, punched-out window shading and a dramatic entrance canopy. A bold color scheme created by broad expanses of PAC-CLAD Precision Series metal panels emphasizes this strong architectural statement.

“We felt we were creating a state-of-the-art facility. We wanted to create cutting-edge architecture to emphasize the cutting-edge approach of the school,” says Derrick Mozingo, AIA, senior partner and design principal with the hometown firm of Mozingo + Wallace, which designed the floor plans and exteriors of all five new schools in the HCSD system. “You don’t go by these buildings without noticing them.”

Designers developed a dynamic façade using PAC-CLAD Precision Series metal panels. The design features sharp corner angles and a dramatic entrance canopy.

Mozingo’s firm was a key member of the design/build team that brought HCSD’s five new schools — including two other middle schools, an elementary and intermediate school — online in only 18 months. FirstFloor Energy Positive led the effort, with SFL+A as design professionals of record and Stantec doing interior design and programing work. Panel and roofing installer Spann Roofing also was on board from the start. That company’s president, Jimbo Spann, says the fast-track schedule kept his installers on their toes.

“It was a big undertaking. There was a lot of design going on throughout the project,” he says. “There were time periods when we were working on several schools at the same time.”

In total, Spann’s team installed more than 100,000 square feet of PAC-CLAD 0.40-gauge aluminum HWP panels across all five schools, with colors chosen to highlight each facility’s athletic team’s colors. According to Mozingo, Petersen’s PAC-CLAD product supported both his budget and his aesthetic vision for the schools.

“It created a very affordable skin, and there was no other material out there that would create that look,” he says. “It gave us a surface that would weather well and gave us that architectural ‘tech’ look we were trying to achieve. We went through a number of studies to get what we ended up with.”

Mozingo notes he and his team also counted on Spann Roofing’s expertise as they went through their studies. “We have had a relationship with Spann Roofing for 30 years,” he says. “They worked with us through the design process and were a large component of that process.”

For Spann’s installers, familiarity with the product and with Petersen also were big advantages. With its responsibility for the wall panels as well as roofing for all five schools, Spann Roofing depended on the kind of responsiveness to questions and schedule demands they knew Petersen could provide.

“Petersen was very helpful, making site visits and making sure everything was going well and that we didn’t have any questions,” he notes, adding that the company also was critical in helping Spann keep up with HCSD’s aggressive timeline. “That took a lot from Petersen as well, in having the material ready on time. Without the material, we could have been in a world of trouble.”

With all five schools open, Spann now has had a little time to reflect on yet another successful project with Petersen and the company’s PAC-CLAD panels. “We know Petersen very well,” he says. “They’re like us – they do high-quality work and take a lot of pride in what they do, and it’s a top-of-the-line product.”

TEAM

Architect: Mozingo + Wallace, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, www.mozingowallace.com

Wall Panel Installer: Spann Roofing, Conway, South Carolina, www.spannroofing.com

MATERIALS

Metal Wall Panels: PAC-CLAD 0.40-gauge aluminum HWP, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Petersen Adds Reps to Meet Demand for Metal Cladding in Western U.S.

Petersen is meeting the growing demand in the Western United States for its PAC-CLAD metal roof and wall products by hiring several representatives in the area. The manufacturer representatives will support architects, installing contractors and others involved in the specification and installation of exterior metal cladding products in Utah, Wyoming, Idaho, Montana, Washington, Oregon and Alaska.

Horner and Associates in Sandy, Utah, hornerassocd7.com, will represent Petersen’s PAC-CLAD products in Utah, Wyoming, Idaho and Montana. Representatives include Gary Horner, Tom Horner and Keith Van Ness. Contact information is as follows:

Gary Horner      801-712-0326     gary@hornerassocd7.com

Tom Horner       801-842-8305     tom@hornerassocd7.com

Keith Van Ness 801-520-5624     keith@hornerassocd7.com

 Harper Winn Inc. in Seattle, harperwinn.com, will support PAC-CLAD customers in Washington, Oregon and Alaska beginning in October. Representatives include Charlie Soffel, Steve Silcock and Paul Amos. Contact information is as follows:

Charlie Soffel    206-619-0163     charlie@harperwinn.com

Steve Silcock    425-220-1190     steve@harperwinn.com

Paul Amos        503-481-5867     paul@harperwinn.com

“Hiring these firms to represent Petersen is one way we’re addressing the growing demand for PAC-CLAD products in the Western United States. We know these reps will satisfy the architectural metal needs of Petersen’s many existing and new customers in the area,” said David Hedrick, regional manager of Petersen’s Phoenix location.

For more information, visit www.pac-clad.com.