Ultra-Steep Slope Roof Poses Challenges in Historic Church Re-Roofing Project

Century Christian Church is a landmark building in Owensboro, Kentucky. Completed in 1963, the church is included on the Kentucky Historic Register and recognized for its unique architectural style.
Photos: Owens Corning

At Century Christian Church in Owensboro, Kentucky, it is not the steeple that points toward the heavens above, but rather the entire roof. The church’s 50/12 pitch roof has become one of the most distinguishing features in the local landscape.

Completed in 1963, Century Christian Church is included on the Kentucky Historic Register and recognized for its unique architectural style. In fact, the roof is so eye-catching that it has been incorporated into the church’s website message which reads, “Our roof reaches up; our hearts reach out.” The roof ascends 40 feet and is divided into four quarters or “bows,” with each symbolizing one of the four Gospels in the Bible.

In 2016, the church’s building committee realized it was time for a new roof. Located in an open field apart from other structures, the roof had been struck by lightning on several occasions. The protective cable that ran down the sides of the church as a conduit for lightning strikes had been eroded and just one section of cable was intact. The building’s location also presented airflow challenges. Storms and strong winds crossing the field had caused shingles to loosen and fly off the building.

According to Harold King, a member of the Century Christian Church building committee, the church considered several criteria when selecting All American Home Improvement, LLC in Evansville, Indiana, to complete the re-roofing project. “We wanted a reputable company who was experienced in doing steep slope work, had an excellent safety record, and had a workforce equipped to meet the needs of this labor-intensive job,” he says, adding that the

The roof ascends 40 feet and is divided into four quarters or “bows,” with each bow symbolizing one of the four Gospels in The Holy Bible. Photos: Owens Corning

company’s Owens Corning Roofing Platinum Contractor certification provided additional confidence. “Our Owens Corning area sales manager, John Sabbak, explained the warranty for the re-roofing project and that was very important for us in selecting the materials for the project,” King says, noting that Sabbak also stopped by at different times during the installation to check in on the progress.

A Daunting Task

What were the challenges the roofing contractor faced in tackling the project? “What wasn’t a challenge?” asked Josh Long, Western Kentucky Sales Manager at All American Home Improvement. The metal capping required to protect the building from lightening, and the scorching summer heat during the installation were just a few of the challenges. By far, however, the two most daunting challenges were the safety concerns associated with the pitch and the wind issues that challenged shingle adhesion.

To help foster safety on the steep slopes, teams were assigned to cover each of the four “bows” comprising the roof. The teams used a precisely calculated system of ladders and walkboards to safely navigate and scale the roof. “Roofers getting home to their families safely every night will always be a top priority at Owens Corning,” says Sabbak, noting that All American Home Improvement teams were outfitted with personal protection equipment and participated in advance walk-through processes to safely tackle the project.

Installation teams from All American Home Improvement participated in advance walk-throughs to ensure everyone was well versed in the safety plan. Photos: Owens Corning

The building committee at Century Christian Church also wanted to avoid the safety and aesthetic concerns associated with shingle fly-off. That’s where Owens Corning SureNail Technology and Duration Shingles came into play. Developed to provide exceptional wind resistance, the system can qualify for a 130-mph wind warranty. “The Duration shingle delivered both the performance and the warranty we needed for a job with this kind of pitch and exposure to airflow,” says Long. According to Long, the shingles were also hand sealed as required by Owens Corning for the building’s pitch. “The SureNail Technology made it easy for the teams to install the shingle correctly because the white strip in the middle of the shingle leaves no doubt as to where the nail should go and facilitated a smooth installation,” he says.

As the roofing project progressed, so did public interest. The local newspaper stopped by to capture photos of residents watching the re-roofing spectacle from lawn chairs on the church lawn. The combination of re-roofing a challenging structure, improving the aesthetics of a historic building and scaling a very steep roof made it a memorable project according to Long. “It was a very unusual project from our daily jobs, and the challenges were part of what made the project so fun,” he notes.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: All American Home Improvement, LLC, Evansville, Indiana, 1shingleatatime.com

MATERIALS

Steep-Slope Roof System: Duration Shingles with SureNail Technology, Owens Corning
Underlayment: ProArmor, Owens Corning

Steep-Slope Projects: Risks, Considerations and Best Practices for Contractors

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Many contractors treat residential roofing as routine. However, whether a re-roof or new construction, each project can be infinitely complex and should be addressed as such by always accounting for weather and safety issues, as well as proper installation and customer service.

One of the most prominent and popular elements of residential architecture is a steep-slope roof. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), steep-slope roofs have slopes greater than 4:12 and range from 18.5 degrees to 45 degrees or more. While the process of installing a roof with these angles isn’t necessarily much different from a low-slope roof, it can pose more risks and considerations for workers.

Weather Woes

Weather plays an important role in every roofing project, but staying on top of potential issues from Mother Nature is especially crucial during steep-slope jobs.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

In high temperatures, workers may fall victim to heat cramps, heat exhaustion, heatstroke or worse. The best way to beat the heat is to start early and get as much done as possible before the temperature peaks. Starting early in the summer—specifically in the South—can allow work to be completed before daily rain showers roll in. Proper hydration and attire are also important.

Cold temperatures can create even more complications because some manufacturers advise against installing their products in weather below 45 degrees Fahrenheit and certain equipment is susceptible to freezing. Furthermore, workers have to pay extra attention to the grip of their shoes to avoid slipping and falling. Not to mention, freezing-cold hands and feet may cause an otherwise adept worker to become clumsy. Wearing the proper clothing is key during cold-weather jobs, and workers should be advised to keep an eye out for the first signs of frostbite, including cold skin, redness, tingling and numbness.

Safety Considerations

In 2015, falls were the leading cause of private-sector work deaths in the construction industry, accounting for nearly 40 percent of worker fatalities, according to OSHA. In addition, OSHA reports nearly 90 percent of fatal falls happen due to the lack of a fall-protection system.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

When working on a roof slope greater than 4/12, OSHA requires additional safety measures, which include either a guardrail system with toeboards, safety net systems or personal fall arrest systems. Yet, many contractors—especially residential roofers—choose to forgo protective devices because they feel they are not feasible or create a greater hazard. In such cases, OSHA does allow the use of alternative fall-protection methods in residential construction, as long as contractors develop a written, job-specific fall-protection plan that complies with OSHA regulations.

Proper Installation

During the installation process, roofers should keep a few things in mind whether they’re applying shingles to a steep-slope or low-slope structure.

  • Valleys
Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Valleys are a critical part of proper roof installation because they experience the most water flow during rainstorms and can be potential leak points.

In an open valley, a piece of aluminum, copper or other type of metal is used to help keep rainwater flowing off the roof. Open valleys are often used when a homeowner wants a showier look, such as on a Colonial-style home.

Closed valleys—the most common valley installation method—use asphalt shingles and offer a more traditional look. When properly installed, they keep water from getting trapped in the valley and allow for proper drainage.

In addition to open and closed valleys, contractors also have the option to create a weave valley, which alternates shingles through the valley from both sides, creating a braid-like effect.

Laminate/architectural shingles should not be used for weave valleys. Because laminate shingles aren’t one-dimensional, they do not create the flat surface needed for a weave valley, which should only be used with three-tab shingles.

When using laminate shingles, be sure to follow instructions on the wrapper for either an open or closed application.

Contractors also need to be extremely careful around obstacles such as chimneys and skylights, which require their own flashing and water divergence methods. For instance, more flashing may be needed in these areas to divert water and prevent leaks.

  • Starter Shingles

Starter shingles allow the first course of shingles to properly seal down, protecting the edge of the roof and providing anchoring power for high-wind resistance at the critical eave and rake areas. They further protect the roof by filling in spaces under the cutouts and edges for the first course of exposed shingles, preventing wind uplift.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

The most common mistake when installing starter shingles or modifying traditional three-tab shingles is putting them on backward or upside-down.

Additionally, the overhang should be no more than three-quarters of an inch to prevent wind from penetrating beneath shingles, as well as to keep shingles from curling or cracking.

In addition, many manufacturers caution against double-stacking pallets of starter shingles, which can cause the bottom shingles to warp. Be sure to read all storage and handling instructions prior to installation.

  • Underlayment

Underlayment is an important part of the roofing process and is required by code for residential properties to meet Class A fire requirements. Serving as a secondary barrier, underlayment protects rakes, eaves and critical flashings from water infiltration. Most warranties also require underlayment for the roof to be ASTM compliant. However, some contractors still opt not to use it because they want to save time on a project or their customer balks at the cost.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Another frequent error during underlayment installation is incorrect overlaps. On low-slope roofs (slopes between 2:12 and 4:12), underlayment should have double coverage. And while traditional installation is fine on steep-slope roofs, always follow manufacturer instructions for overlaps from course to course.

Last but not least, be sure to keep underlayment from wrinkling, which can cause ripples in the shingles. While trying to keep underlayment as flat as possible, avoid pulling it too tight because it has a natural expansion and contraction. If underlayment gets wet, be sure it adequately dries out before continuing the installation process.

  • Shingles and Nails

Shingles should be installed with the manufacturer’s recommended offset, which will help prevent leak points and also properly align the shingles across the roof. Once all of the shingles are aligned, only the shingles themselves should be exposed—not the nails.

Because the common bond area is the strongest part of a shingle, manufacturers require nails be placed there to achieve the advertised wind performance. Nails should not be too high or too low, or unevenly spaced. If nails aren’t positioned correctly, the manufacturer’s wind warranty may not be valid.

Customer Service Follow-Up

Providing excellent customer service is key to every roofing job. Homeowners who have a good experience are more likely to share positive reviews and opinions.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Before starting a steep-slope project, be sure to discuss the entire process with homeowners to ensure that they know what to expect, as well as the types of warranties they will receive with their new roof. In addition, prepare the surrounding property, such as windows and landscaping, to prevent damage during the installation process.

During the job, be sure workers are vigilant about not dropping nails anywhere on the jobsite. After the job, walk the property with the homeowners to ensure all debris and materials were cleaned up; magnets can be used to double-check for stray nails. If the homeowners are happy with the finished product and their experience, don’t be afraid to ask them to write a nice review on the company website, Angie’s List, Yelp or other customer referral app.

Most of the best practices for steep-slope roofing can be applied to any type of roofing project. However, steep-slope work can pose additional challenges that other projects may not. Always follow manufacturer’s instructions and OSHA guidelines on all roofing jobs, but especially on steep-slope projects, when one minor slip could turn into major consequences for all involved.

About the Author: Paul Casseri is the product manager of the Roofing Shingles and Underlayment Division for Atlas Roofing Corp., www.atlasroofing.com. He is responsible for all areas of product management, including product initiation, feasibility, design, development and testing. He is a graduate of Penn State University with more than 20 years of experience in the building products industry.

 

IKO PRO4 Plus Roofing Components System Promotion Awards New Truck

Idaho-based contractor KD Roofing is the recipient of a Dodge RAM 1500 Tradesman pickup truck as well as $22,500 in cash bonuses, thanks to its performance in the IKO PRO4 Plus Roofing Components System Promotion.

The initial PRO4 promotion was first introduced to encourage contractors to experience the benefits of working with a roofing system by offering rebate incentives. It was upgraded to the PRO4 Plus Promotion in 2016 to include per-square rebates for contractors, along with cash bonuses and the chance to earn a brand-new pickup truck for their fleet — which will continue in 2017.

For example, participating contractors have the opportunity to earn up to an $8.00 rebate per square when installed with any three components from the PRO4 Roofing Components System — in addition to up to $22,500 in cash bonuses and a top-tier incentive of a new truck.

Family Success

Located just outside of Boise in Meridian, Idaho, KD Roofing provides a variety of residential and commercial roofing services with a specialty in new construction. Following in the footsteps of their father and KD Roofing’s founder, Kendall Doty, brothers Justin and Jared Doty, office manager and general manager at KD Roofing, helped to drive the company’s success in the promotion.

“We feel blessed to have earned this recognition and are pleased to put the cash bonus and truck back into use for the company,” Justin says.

Additionally, Jared noted that KD Roofing’s Production Manager, David Allen, who has been a long-time employee and friend of the company, also played a role in the success thanks to his continued support in the growth of the company.

“It goes without saying that we have the entire KD Roofing team to thank for this accomplishment,” Jared says.

Distributor and Manufacturer Support

The Doty brothers also noted that support from their distributor, Roofline Supply and Delivery (a division of SRS Distribution), was an element to their success. In fact, the branch manager for Roofline’s Boise location, James Phillips, first introduced the promotion to the KD Roofing team.

“I’ve had a relationship with the KD team almost my entire career in the roofing industry, so when I learned of the PRO4 Plus Promotion, I knew it was a good fit for them,” Phillips says. “But things like this don’t happen overnight; it takes a lot of work and dedication to achieve what the KD Roofing team did. They’ve also built a reputation and trust among their customers by delivering service for more than 20 years.”

IKO Territory Sales Representative, Andrew Buehner, also worked closely with Phillips and the KD Roofing team during the promotion. He helped provide product knowledge and expertise, as well as local service and support to keep the promotion running smoothly for KD Roofing, Phillips added.

“We were onboard with the promotion after discussion with Roofline, but once they introduced us to our IKO rep, Andrew, we knew it was going to be great working with IKO,” Jared says. “IKO is a family-owned business like ours and shares similar valuesplus.”

Coordinating Roofing Components

A roofing components system is engineered to provide more performance than installing just shingles alone.

As such, IKO has developed the PRO4 roofing components system, which includes four multi-layered roofing accessories that protect vulnerable areas of the roof, including eave protection (ice and water protectors), underlayment (for deck protection), roof starters (starter strips to save installation time) and ridge cap shingles (provide protection along a roof’s high-stress areas and accentuate the roof line).

“Our favorite part of working with the PRO4 system is offering our clients a shingle and coordinating components from a single manufacturer,” Jared says. “It’s a benefit for our customers when we assure them it’s one system that’s intended to work together.”

To see a video interview featuring the KD Roofing team and additional details on the IKO PRO4 Plus Promotion, please visit the IKO TV YouTube channel. For more information about IKO’s complete portfolio of residential roofing products and accessories, visit the website.

Polyglass USA Celebrates 25 Years of Roofing, Waterproofing Materials Production

Polyglass USA Inc. is celebrating 25 years of producing roofing and waterproofing materials for the North American roofing industry. Polyglass will commemorate this milestone with its customers throughout 2017.

Polyglass is a manufacturer of modified bitumen roof membranes, elastomeric roof coatings and underlayments. Founded in the early 1950s by roofing contractors in northern Italy, Polyglass established its first manufacturing plant in the 1960s serving roofing contractors across Europe. The company grew and expanded operations into the U.S. in 1992 with its first location in Fernley, Nev. By 2006, Polyglass had grown to three US facilities with the addition of plants in Pennsylvania and Florida.

In 2008, Polyglass was acquired by Mapei, a global manufacturer of adhesives, sealants and construction materials for the building industry. Since the acquistion, Polyglass has added a manufacturing location in Arizona, with an additional facility in Texas slated to be operational at the end of 2017. The Polyglass manufacturing facilities are ISO 9001:2008 certified and strategically located to serve its customers.

“Celebrating 25 years of successfully developing and producing roofing solutions that has helped transform the roofing industry would not be possible without our committed employees,” says CEO Natalino Zanchetta. “With a focus on quality, Polyglass has developed solutions for use in every climate and we continue to innovate to meet the changing needs of our customers.”

Since developing its first compound formula decades ago, Polyglass has added hundreds of products that extend the roof-life cycle, help manage building energy loads and enhance building aesthetics. With the launch of patented ADESO Technology, Polyglass provided a way to install modified bitumen membranes. Polyglass also developed patented CURE Technology, a thin film technology applied to membranes during the manufacturing process to increase reflectivity, durability, stain and UV resistance, granule retention and energy efficiency.

As part of its commitment to customers, Polyglass offers continuing education through Polyschool, a two-day training program that teaches best practices in the installation of Polyglass’ commercial and residential products. Polyglass has also developed a customer loyalty program with its Q Rewards program – rewarding its customers for their Polyglass product purchases.

RICOWI to Host Underlayment Seminar on March 17

The underlayment systems play a vital role in today’s roof designs for long-term performance. The challenges of selecting the right materials, application techniques and performance criteria can be challenging to the roofing professional. RICOWI‘s Spring Seminar, which will be held March 17, 2017, in Anaheim, Calif., will provide an in-depth look at the two styles of underlayments—organic and synthetic—that might be used in low- and steep-slope roof designs. This seminar will touch upon the product designs, product approvals and code language that address how to select and properly use these various underlayment products in roof system applications.

Underlayment Speakers
Organic Underlayment: Doug Thagard, Fontana Paper Mills
Synthetic Underlayment: Mark Strait, Synthetic Roof Underlayment Institute

When underlayments are installed as part of a roof system, they may have special requirements for how they are designed, selected and installed to meet the anticipated roof performance. To better understand the relationship of the components, the speakers will cover the various styles of roof applications that will help inform the audience of best practices from the various industry associations.

Association Speakers
Low-slope Underlayment Applications: Mike Ennis, SPRI
Steep-slope Underlayment Applications:

For more information, visit RICOWI’s website or contact Joan Cook, executive director, at (330) 671-4569.

Synthetic Roof Underlayment Institute Is Represented at IBS Show

Synthetic Roof Underlayment Institute (SRUI) had a strong presence at the recent International Builders’ Show. SRUI member companies displayed synthetic underlayments to the over 80,000 IBS attendees. Several board members participated in the show by meeting with potential new SRUI members, answering questions and offering details on the benefits of SRUI membership.

Interest in SRUI continues to grow as the organization builds its influence throughout the underlayment industry.

“I am encouraged by the response and level of interest in the organization,” says SRUI Membership Chair, Bruce Hayden. “As we have expanded our engagement in the standards development process and our outreach to associations representing the various roof cladding materials, people are recognizing SRUI’s influence. That is creating more interest in the organization.”

The overall foot traffic at the show was solid with many companies giving positive reviews on the quality and number of leads.

SRUI members are looking forward to the International Roofing Expo in Las Vegas, NV, March 1-3, 2017. Several member companies will be displaying synthetic roof underlayments as well as meeting with new member candidates to further education and growth of synthetic roofing.

Project Profiles: Hospitality & Entertainment

B.O.B., Grand Rapids, Mich.

Roof Materials

The double-sided green wall surrounds guests with nature and provides fresh ingredients for the food they enjoy.

The double-sided green wall surrounds guests with nature and provides fresh ingredients for the food they enjoy.

The B.O.B.’s 900-square-foot Sky Patio was completed in August 2015 when its signature green wall was installed. The distinctive double-sided green wall surrounds guests with nature and provides fresh ingredients for the food they enjoy.

“Our living wall on the Sky Patio is a vivid symbol of our commitment to sustainability and support of the local environments where our restaurants are located,” says Alice Jasper, director of sustainability, the Gilmore Collection. “It greens up the exterior and interior of the rooftop patio, contributing to the beautification of downtown, making the patio more inviting from the street below and enhancing the dining experience of our guests.”

The two-sided green wall totals 608 square feet. Three exterior sections (48 inches in height) are attached to the outside of the fencing that surrounds the patio. Facing out to the street, these sections frame the Sky Patio on three sides with flowering annuals and perennials. There are five interior sections (45 1/2 inches in height), three on the inside of the perimeter fence, two on the back wall of the building. In addition to flowers, the interior sections include vegetables and herbs used in the kitchen.

The two-sided green wall totals 608 square feet.

The two-sided green wall totals 608 square feet.

“Local sourcing of ingredients is one of our main sustainable hospitality practices,” says Barbie Smith, the Gilmore Collection’s gardener. “With the green wall at the B.O.B., we grow ingredients right near the tables where our guests dine. You cannot get more local than that.”

“What chef wouldn’t want a garden with fresh herbs and produce right in their restaurant? A green wall makes it practical,” adds Mick Rickerd, chef at Bobarino’s. “We utilize the herbs in all our everyday dishes and the vegetables, like Swiss chard and rainbow carrots, in daily features. Our mixology team incorporates fresh basil, mint, lemongrass and thyme into special summer cocktails.”

Green Wall Manufacturer: LiveWall

Roof Report

The B.O.B. is the Gilmore Collection’s most ambitious project, and it exemplifies the company’s commitment to sustainability. The B.O.B. is an acronym for Big Old Building; the 70,000-square-foot, 4-story, red brick building was constructed in 1903 as a grocery warehouse. It stood vacant for decades before the Gilmore Collection saved it from demolition and began its transformation into a landmark hospitality destination in downtown Grand Rapids. The B.O.B. offers multiple venues, including bars, restaurants, comedy and nightclubs, as well as the rooftop Sky Patio, which is accessible through Bobarino’s restaurant on the second floor.

Photos: LiveWall

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Customize Underlayment with Your Company Logo

The Synthetic Guard Plus Underlayment can be customized with a contractor’s company logo and phone number.

The Synthetic Guard Plus Underlayment can be customized with a contractor’s company logo and phone number.

TAMKO Building Products Inc. has made available Synthetic Guard Plus Underlayment, which can be used underneath metal roofing, mechanically fastened tile, wood shake, asphalt, slate and composite roofing. Made of plastic fibers, spun-bonded to make non-woven mat, the underlayment is printed with lay lines and cap nail locations for easy installation. It also has cap nail locations for high-wind and Florida applications. The underlayment can be customized with a contractor’s company logo and phone number.

Synthetic Underlayment Can Be Used on Nearly Any Roof

Based on contractor demand, Berry Plastics Co., the makers of the TYPAR Weather Protection System, launched Surround VR Underlayment, a synthetic roofing underlayment.

Based on contractor demand, the makers of the TYPAR Weather Protection System launched a synthetic underlayment named Surround VR.

Based on contractor demand, Berry Plastics Co., the makers of the TYPAR Weather Protection System, launched Surround VR Underlayment, a synthetic roofing underlayment.

Designed with the installer in mind, Surround VR Underlayment reduces the amount and weight of material needed for roofing jobs. In fact, one roll of Surround VR covers the same area as five rolls of 30# felt, yet weighs seven times less and is 10 times stronger.

The waterproof product was developed to work in nearly any roofing application, including with shingles, shakes, tile, slate or metal roofs. “With our new Surround VR Underlayment, installers will make fewer and easier trips up and down the ladder while experiencing faster installs, all while providing a more durable roofing system to their customers,” says Jorge Martinez, senior director of Product Marketing, TYPAR brand.

Made from a waterproof, synthetic polymer material, Surround VRUnderlayment is engineered to repel moisture and will not warp or buckle when wet, thus helping to maximize the life of the roof system. Surround VR is also slip-resistant on dry surfaces and provides better traction when wet.

The underlayment maintains its integrity year-round, performing well in temperatures ranging from -40 to 240 F. In cold temperatures, the material will not crack or wrinkle, which helps ensure smooth installs. In warm temperatures, its heat-reflecting, gray-colored surface reduces heat buildup on the roof. Surround VR also can withstand up to six months’ exposure to UV light and high winds and storms, even those experienced by coastal regions.

Surround VR Underlayment is backed by a 15-year product replacement warranty and is suited for residential and commercial applications.

Learn More

Visit Typar.com
Call (800) 284-2780

Historic Home Gets a Refresh with a Striking New Copper Roof

Anyone who spends time in Connecticut finds themselves in a place with deep historical roots that stretch back to colonial times. It is an inherent part of the charm of the state and something in which residents take great pride.

Along with delivering the performance desired by the homeowners, the copper roof maintains the traditional look and feel of the house.

Along with delivering the performance desired by the homeowners, the copper roof maintains the traditional look and feel of the house.

There is a real, tangible window to this rich historical tradition in many of the historic homes and buildings all across the state. Great care has been taken to preserve the look and operation of many historic structures and to integrate them into the architectural fabric of communities all around Connecticut.

Like many places and institutions in the state, Litchfield County has a history that goes back to pre-Revolutionary days. Established as a county in 1719, Litchfield County was home to Harriett Beecher Stowe and was also where Sarah Pierce established in 1792 the Litchfield Female Academy, one of the first major educational institutions for women and girls in the U.S.

Today, Litchfield County has 166 properties and districts listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Staying true to the architectural heritage of the state is very important to the people who live there. However, just because a home or building looks like it did a few hundred years ago doesn’t mean it has to operate that way, too. Many owners of historic homes want to bring the function of their houses into modern times while still keeping the look and feel of the past.

This was the case for homeowners in Litchfield County who wanted to make some modern improvements while still preserving the traditional look and feel of their home in Sharon, Conn. For this work, the homeowners turned to the professionals at Anderson Enterprises, a general contracting building and renovation firm in Sharon. The project started with modest goals in mind but quickly grew.

“We were initially hired to replace four oak floors,” recalls Ellen Burcroff with Anderson Enterprises. “That was then extended to changing the mouldings, re-plastering, painting, renovating the third floor and master bedroom, as well as rebuilding the chimney and replacing the roof.”

Anderson Enterprises won the job after an interview. “Our goal was to get the homeowners into a more pleasing interior,” Burcroff says.

The entire home features a brass snow-retention system. PHOTO: MetalPlus LLC

The entire home features a brass snow-retention system. PHOTO: MetalPlus LLC

As part of the interior overhaul, the project included providing the home with proper ventilation and insulation. Along with delivering the performance desired by the homeowners, maintaining the traditional look and feel of the house was extremely important. Performing this kind of retrofit on a historic home without damaging the exterior often means going in through the roof, which was what was decided upon for this project. Removing the old wood shake roof meant installing a new one. The contractor believed this was a perfect time for a change.

“The customers wanted a historically authentic look,” Burcroff explains. “We strongly recommended not using wood shingles again. Ultimately, we all decided on using copper for the new roof.”

A copper roof was a perfect solution for this project for many reasons. On a performance level, the homeowners were interested in the durability and energy efficiency of copper. Aesthetically, copper delivers a striking curb appeal that is still in keeping with the historic nature of the home. And its natural patina will only enhance the look of the home over time.

GETTING IT DONE

With the appropriate decisions made, Anderson Enterprises’ team started work on the home. The wood shakes and wood lath were removed, exposing the rafters underneath. Fiberglass insulation was installed with about a 2-inch space left above the rafters for airflow.

PHOTOS: VLC IMAGES MOBILE STUDIO, COURTESY MARIO LALLIER, unless otherwise noted

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