Nashville, Tenn., Begins Revitalization of Its City Center with a New Convention Space that Features a Truly Unique Roof

It isn’t often that a nightmare becomes a pleasant reality. Andy Baker, vice president of Raleigh, N.C.- based Baker Roofing, recalls the year he spent as project manager for the roofing of the new Music City Center in Nashville, Tenn., as one of his most challenging jobs. “The logistics, a tight spot downtown, the size of the project and everything that goes along with that—thousands of people trying to work and everyone needs their material in that area at the same time. Even the unique shape of the building made it hard,” Baker remembers. “We’re glad it’s done and we can look back on it now and say: ‘Wow! We did that.’”

The Music City Center was built to be the catalyst for more development in the SoBro neighborhood of Nashville, Tenn. It is intended to create a diverse economy that won’t be affected if flooding occurs, like in May 2010.

The Music City Center was built to be the catalyst for more development in the SoBro neighborhood of Nashville, Tenn. It is intended to create a diverse economy that won’t be affected if flooding occurs, like in May 2010.

Baker and his crew of up to 50 roofing workers have much to be proud of. The completed project is the largest capital construction project in Nashville’s history and was designed to bring prosperity to the area known as SoBro, or South of Broadway, which was affected by massive flooding in May 2010. The Music City Center lies outside the flood-prone areas and hopefully will be the catalyst for more development, which will create a diverse economy that won’t be affected if another flood occurs.

In addition to the Music City Center’s imaginative design that resembles various musical instruments, the building boasts a number of features that are ideal for a high-profile project. Many of these features are located in the most opportune of places—the roof. An Energy Star-qualified thermoplastic PVC membrane covers the 643,752-squarefoot roof while a 186,700-square-foot vegetated roof literally mimics the rolling hills of Tennessee’s Highland Rim. The rooftop also hosts a 211-kilowatt solar-power system on the 1-acre area that is over the Grand Ballroom, a rooftop space that resembles an acoustic guitar in shape. Lastly, the roof collects rainwater that is funneled to a 360,000-gallon tank before it is used to irrigate the site and flush hundreds of toilets inside.

Construction Challenges

Baker and his colleagues knew the Music City Center would present many challenges even before work began. “We knew it was going to be a logistical nightmare going in but then you have to live it,” he recalls. “You would think four city blocks would be a large enough area to work from but there were thousands of contractors working and receiving materials at the same time. Trying to keep truck drivers and suppliers happy was difficult. The community was great though; there were a lot of police officers around to direct traffic.”

Baker Roofing's team of up to 50 roofing workers spent one year working on the Music City Center.

Baker Roofing’s team of up to 50 roofing workers spent one year working on the Music City Center.

Installation also proved perplexing because of the roof’s undulating slopes of 1/4:12 to 12:12. Baker likens the rolls to waves and points out in some places they were almost conical in shape. In the areas in which there was no vegetated roof, the crew fastened two layers of 1.7-inch polyisocyanurate insulation followed by 1/4-inch roof board. Then a 60-mil thermoplastic PVC membrane in a light gray color was fully adhered to the assembly. The membrane features a lacquer coating to reduce dirt pickup.

Photos: Keri Baker

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Best Roofing Projects of the Carolinas

We celebrate the best roofs installed in North and South Carolina with our final issue of Carolinas Roofing. From metal to shingles to single ply and coatings, these roof coverings protect newly built and reroofed schools, homes, manufacturing facilities, city-service buildings and more.

Judy W. Rose Football Center-Fieldhouse and the McColl-Richardson Field Press Box, University of North Carolina, Charlotte

Judy W. Rose Football Center-Fieldhouse and the McColl-Richardson Field Press Box, University of North Carolina, Charlotte

Judy W. Rose Football Center-Fieldhouse and the McColl-Richardson Field Press Box, University of North Carolina, Charlotte

Team

Roofing contractor: Baker Roofing Co., Charlotte, www.bakerroofing.com
Designers: Jenkins-Peer Architects, Charlotte, www.jenkinspeer.com, and DLR Group, www.dlrgroup.com
Construction manager: Rogers PCL Russell, a joint venture of Rodgers Builders Inc., Charlotte, www.rodgersbuilders.com; PCL Constructors Inc., Charlotte, www.pcl.com; and H.J. Russell & Co., Atlanta, www.hjrussell.com
Metal roofing manufacturer: McElroy Metal, Bossier City, La., www.mcelroymetal.com

Roof Materials

New metal roofing matches the campus scheme on many other buildings. It also offers overall longevity, durability and low-maintenance features.

The field house and press box are covered with 11,000 square feet of Maxima 216, 24-gauge Kynar in Slate Gray and 4,000 square feet of 24-gauge flat stock metal roofing and low-slope roofing trim.

Roof Report

2013-14 is the first year for Charlotte 49ers football. This new 15,000-seat stadium was built for the new team and is designed to be expanded to 40,000 seats. The main building, the Judy W. Rose Football Center-Fieldhouse, located in the south end zone, has been named after the university’s longtime athletic director.

The stadium includes several other buildings, including the McColl-Richardson Field Press Box, named in honor of Hugh McColl, former Bank of America CEO, and Jerry Richardson, owner of the NFL’s Carolina Panthers.

Photo courtesy of McElroy Metal, Bossier City, La.

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Project Profiles: Government

Richland County Landfill Columbia, S.C.

Petersen Aluminum roofing

Team

Roofing contractor: Aqua Seal Manufacturing and Roofing Inc., West Columbia, S.C.
Metal roof, soffit and wall manufacturer: Petersen Aluminum Corp., Elk Grove Village, Ill.

Roof Materials

The following materials were used on the roof:

  • 6,903 square feet of 24-gauge Tite-Loc in the Cityscape color
  • 1,216 square feet of 24-gauge HWP 16-inch Panel in the Cityscape color
  • 1,673 square feet of 0.032 PAC-850 Full Vent in the Cityscape color

Roof Report

Petersen Aluminum roofing
This new construction project began in early October 2012 and was completed in April 2013. Petersen Aluminum provided a complete metal system: roof, soffit and wall.

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

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